VansAirForceForums  
Home > VansAirForceForums

- POSTING RULES
- Donate yearly (please).
- Advertise in here!

- Today's Posts | Insert Pics

  #41  
Old 03-29-2016, 02:46 PM
Finley Atherton Finley Atherton is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: AUSTRALIA
Posts: 692
Default

Congratulations.
If you are ever in the Armidale area or just looking for a place to fly, contact me and we can have a mini 9A convention!
Fin
9A (860 hrs)
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 05-09-2016, 04:11 PM
RetiredRacer RetiredRacer is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Ipswich QLD Australia
Posts: 238
Default Congratulations Rob.!!!!

I have not been on the VAF forum for a while as there has been too much happening in my life lately. It's good to see you have now got it registered and in phase one, awesome.!!!!

We should take Fin up on his offer one weekend. Robyn and I could come down from Brisbane. That would be something, the only two 9a's registered RAA getting together.!!

Bob Dennis
RV9a (893 lb 405hrs)
(Baby 0-235 C2C)

Last edited by RetiredRacer : 05-09-2016 at 04:14 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 09-06-2016, 04:59 AM
KRviator's Avatar
KRviator KRviator is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sydney, Aust.
Posts: 694
Default 40 Hours DONE!

Today I finished flying off the Phase-I testing and I thought I'd celebrate with a bit of coastal flying on the way back to Cessnock. You know, some poor buggers have to pay hard earned cash for this kind of thing!





Soooooo...What did I find/learn/stuffup in Phase I? Well, several things, actually...

First and foremost, this thing is a blast! Here she is sitting outside the hangar a couple of months ago before a fuel-flow test, IIRC...


Secondly, it turns out my fiberglass skills weren't quite as good as I thought...Part of my RHS Lower Intersection Fairing is now adorning some farmers paddock following sideslip testing early in the piece.


The Dynon autopilot required no - that's right, zero calibration or settings-alteration to work, and work well - in my RV. I have both pitch and roll servos installed with the Dynon brackets and changed nothing. It has done everything I have asked of it so far, straight out of the box. That being said, I have the SV32 servo's IIRC, and occasionally the roll servo slips when trying to initiate a turn at high-ish speed. Give the stick a small nudge and that's all that's needed to keep it happy.

Something else I've learnt - Just because you can climb at nearly 2000FPM and turn downwind inside the aerodrome boundary, doesn't mean you should. I got chatted by the ARO about turning crosswind too soon after he apparently had a couple of annoyed locals complain about me having (too much) fun. Entirely my fault though, as there is a fly-neighbourly-type policy for Cessnock Airport and I wasn't aware of it. I am now. I can still reach circuit altitude by the perimeter fence, but fly upwind another half-mile before turning downwind.

Another learning point: If you do your fuel calibration on a Dynon SkyView system, exit to your main screen (PFD/Map/EMS) before you power down your system, or your fuel cal tables won't be saved. Ask me how I learnt that one!

Next: Brisbane Centre get's a little antsy about VFR paints tooling around in their Class-E doing funny-looking things on their scopes. I never got booted out, but was questioned several times about what I was doing and why I was doing what I was doing where I was doing it. Being able to be flexible about your flight testing goes a long way to keeping the guys and girls in ATC on-side though, so I was quite happy to descend a couple of thousand feet or otherwise help them out as needed with accepting a discreet code, etc. They were nothing but polite and professional throughout and I look forward to working with them more in future.

It turns out you can hover a fixed-wing. If you find a 60MPH wind at 3,000'! This was fairly early in the testing regime and I wasn't as confident with the handling as I am now. If I was to do it now, I could probably get it down to 0MPH GS.


What else have I learnt?
  • For planning purposes, I will use 10.5L to climb to & descend from, 8000', and will use 24.2LPH at 2400RPM at 8000', while TASing 145 knots at 55% power. This speed will probably increase slightly when I install the upper intersection fairings though.
  • 2300RPM gives a nice 500FPM descent, at 145KTAS.
  • It pays to do inflight mag-checks. The #3 plug lead fell off the Left P-Mag inflight. Nothing a quick re-crimp and reinstallation didn't fix and it has been fine for 25 hours since.
  • I have a pesky oil leak somewhere I am still trying to track down.
  • Running down a Shorai battery does not do any favours for long-term use. I did it once and it has never been the same.
  • The Rotec TBI must have blast-cooling on the regulator, or have it further away from the exhaust pipes than I currently have it. It suffers vapour-lock on the ground at low RPM after a quick-turn. Not an issue in flight, but it doesn't like to idle below 1000RPM when hot. Cold, it will idle down to 500RPM relatively smoothly.
  • The LHS exhaust pipe makes a loud drumming on the floorboards that causes the AKG ANR to over-compensate. Putting my left foot on the magic spot and flying with the LHS left rudder pedal solves that. What any future passengers will think about me playing footsies with them remains to be seen.
  • The AKG headphones are much better than the Bose QC15's I was using with the UFlyMike adapter (though that is still an excellent ANR combo in its' own right) but their customer-service leaves a bit to be desired. I have a loud crackling in one earcup and am waiting for the bloke to get back off leave to respond. Seems rather poor form to have but one person to deal with that kind of thing....
  • The PlanePower FS14B alternator easily copes with my electrical demands, which top out at 6A in flight.
  • The Silver/Red/Yellow livery stands out like dogs balls in the circuit, I'm told.

I have not been able to complete the full CG testing regime, due to the regulatory MTOW limit of 600Kg/1320Lbs. I'll knock that over when I re-register Aurora Australis with CAsA or RAAus gets their MTOW increase, though with that said, I can't go outside CG limits with any loading configuration possible at present.
__________________
Once you have tasted flight you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards, for there you have been and there you will long to return - Leonardo DaVinci

My Flickr gallery: http://www.flickr.com/photos/35521362@N06/

RV-9A 19-8519 - Finished on 10th February 2016 after 4 years, 9 months and 19 days! The 1020th RV-9 flying.

First flight 26th March 2016. Phase I done. Essential specs 145KTAS @ 2400RPM, 8000', 24.2LPH, Initial RoC 1800FPM.
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 09-07-2016, 03:08 PM
rightrudder rightrudder is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Laguna Hills, CA
Posts: 1,603
Default

A huge congrats! Glad to hear there are only minor squawks and that your Skyview turned out to be plug-n-play.

I hear you about the climb capability. I tend to climb into the pattern at about 90 KIAS, which still gives me a climb rate of 800-900 fpm yet provides better visibility over the nose and gets plenty of cooling air over the cylinders. It's fun to occasionally do a Vx takeoff, just for kicks.

I've got the same sweet spot in cruise, 145-148 kts true. It's just happy there.

Enjoy!
__________________
Doug
RV-9A "slider"
Flew to Osh in 2017!
Tail number N427DK
Donation made for 2018
You haven't seen a tree until you've seen its shadow from the sky -- Amelia Earhart

Last edited by rightrudder : 09-07-2016 at 03:11 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 06-18-2018, 08:55 PM
KRviator's Avatar
KRviator KRviator is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sydney, Aust.
Posts: 694
Default 2 year update

So, it is 2-odd years since I first flew - though I lost nearly 12 months of that after getting cleaned up by a kid on a motorbike that broke my arm and leg - so I figured I might as well post a few tidbits about what I've found/learnt so far.

After swapping to the Mk II Rotec TBI 48/4-5 from the original Mk I, I have not suffered vapour lock since, but in saying that, I also wrapped the fuel lines FWF with exhaust wrap, and now run AvGas exclusively for takeoff and landing, so it is impossible to draw a definitive conclusion, though Avgas with the MkI did cause occasional issues on a quick-turn on a hot day too.

Indicated fuel flow almost doubled on installing the new TBI, and I am not sure why, as it will fluctuate from a normal 24-25LPH right up to 35-36 in the cruise. I am going to make a custom fuel line from the flow sensor to the TBI to try to eliminate the 2 x 90* bends as it exits the red cube. A 2 hour flight test showed I am still using the normal 24.5LPH though, so it isn't actually flowing more fuel, thankfully.

Running a tank dry (intentionally, I might add), results in a brief stumble, around 5KIAS speed loss and takes around 5 seconds to come back up to cruise power after switching tanks. I am comfortable enough with this behaviour to make it a standard practice on cross-country flights now to maximise what I'll call "known" fuel available on landing, and ensuring it is all on the one tank.

I still have a pesky oil leak somewhere, but it certainly isn't safety-critical, just annoying. Oil stabilises a smidgen under 6Qts. Anything other than that and it spits it out the breather tube. Oil use between the few changes so far is negligible.

After a bit of back-and-forth with the lads at OzRunways (Aussie version of Foreflight, etc), we were able to get the old Ipad 2 to wifi the flight plan to the SkyView system and it accepts it with no problems whatsoever. A brilliant setup.

BillM at UpNorthAviation keeps all the old CAD files for his customers panels - so when I wanted to redo my panel to accomodate the Carling V switches and couldn't find my version, he emailed the original in a matter of hours, and still has very reasonable prices for his work. Still a pleasure to work with.

On those Carling V switches - I ordered them, with custom actuators from the folks at RockerSwitchPros, with most being V1D1-GXXB. Decent price, fast shipping, BUT - and it is a very BIIIG 'but' - I assumed that as the 'dependent' LED was at the bottom, that they would be "Up for off, down for on". This is not the case. These switches are "Down for off, UP for on", so my dependent lettering saying "ON" when pressed actually turns them off. Also - it turns out these switches are designed to be inserted between a supply and a load. I am using these switches to control my VP-X, that then controls the load. The problem with this setup is the dependent LED's do not work at all, as there is no current flowing through the switch. If you want to use the bottom LED as an indicator of circuit status, these need to be between the VP-X and your device with that power pin set to 'always on', or you need to buy a switch that has two independent LED's and tap into the positive lead from the VP-X to also illuminate your switch. It isn't a huge problem, just means I have to re-order the switch actuators with "OFF" as the bottom text.

As regards the instrument panel: Have a look on plans, page 24A, where the throttle sub-pane mounting screw insert is. See how they are off-set from the actual throttle/mixture control holes? Guess which muppet missed that little tidbit in the plans, and then had to remove the throttle cable to remove the sub-panel?!? I finally remedied that a couple of days ago when installing the new panel.

I have installed a KLN-90B old-school IFR GPS as under Australian rules, this pushes the 'time for a positive position fix' for VFR pilots out from 30 minutes to 2 hours, and an approved RNAV system (such as the KLN) counts as a positive fix. It talks to SkyView using the ARINC-429 module, and it will display the flight-plan on the SkyView map page too. But, because SkyView does not transmit ARINC labels 306 and 307, you cannot send waypoints from SkyView to the KLN, unfortunately.

Here's a demo showing the GPS RNAV approach into Albury. Lots of red as I am still on the ground miles away.


Because I couldn't justify the cost of a Mid-Continent annunciator panel (and couldn't seem to get lucky with a12V unit on eBay), I decided to DIY an annunciator panel for the KLN, using Carling V switches and some custom actuators, again from the folk at RockerSwitchPros. And they turned out rather nicely too, I think...


And with "OBS" mode selected:


The new panel - very similar to the old one, but with the Carling switches, and the GPS annunciators (and yes, they are mirrord on both sides. Why? Because I can, and it'll give Mini-Me something to play with enroute. His switch contacts are not connected.)


I couldn't justify the cost of a set of Classic Aero seats, nice as they may be, so after measuring the KRviatrix's Suzuki Swift, I figured those seats would likely fit. And they do! Quite well, in fact. I needed to trim a small wedge of foam from the outboard shoulder to clear the aft canopy frame, but that is masked by the seat fabric, and I cut out a 6x6x6" cube for stick movement, but they do fit (almost pefrectly over the Vans aluminium seat back, are surprisingly lightweight when you remove the steel frames, and are amazingly comfortable, probably due to the bucket-style. And they have headrests, though I should have straightened up the coey's one before I took this photo...


Following on from the above photo, that yellow thing in the background is a Rescue Swag, an all-purpose first-aid kit in a heavy duty roll-out yellow vinyl wrapper. It's clipped onto two eye-bolts sourced from the aviation aisle at the local Bunnings, with the platenuts tapped to match the threads. IT isn't quick-and-easy to get to, but anything extremely serious is likely to be beyond its' capabilities anyway.


And as the Rescue Swag may either go down with the plane if I ditch, or burn if I crash, I now fly wearing a survival vest containing some personal 'must-haves' that cover the basics and will hopefully keep me alive until rescued. I don't kid myself that flying is "safe". Let's face it, I built a plane in my back shed...I don't view flying as particularly unsafe, but things can, and do, go wrong, and I'd like to swing the odds in my favour wherever I can. While wearing this vest, you can still fit in the seat reasonably comfortably, and can also comfortably wear a (manually) inflatable life vest as well if needed. Some of my flying involves low-level over-water legs where you would certainly get wet if you had an engine failure.

Some of the items in the vest, and their reasons for being there are described below:
  • PLB: A GME MT-410G, A 406 PLB with the -G model having GPS functionality built-in. It also has a 7-year battery life, and, in accordance with CAsA requirements, is registered to me such that if I do set it off, AMSA can call a list of pre-supplied contacts, and if they determine it is a genuine activation, I've even uploaded a photo of the -9 to their database so they know what they're looking for. A great idea from the Government, surprisingly...
  • Firefly Strobe. I got it from my ADF days and figured I can finally put it to use. IR probably isn't as useful in civilian life as I don't think any of our EMS helicopters use NVG's 'yet'.
  • Survival kit: Signal mirror to try to attract attention in daylight. Space blanket for shelter & keeping warm at night. Matches, firestarter & cotton balls to try to get a fire going if stranded overnight. Wire saw to cut small branches for shelter if needed. Condoms to store/carry water if needed - 2L if used in one of my socks. Swiss card as a small knife, scissors, pen, toothpick & small file in a credit-card sized footprint.
  • First-aid kit: The essentials to stem a major bleed if I don't have the rescue swag. Tampon & sanitary pad as they are small, already sterile, and quite absorbent. Dressings and tape to cover the wound/s. Triangular & crepe bandages in case I break something & need to splint it.
  • Mini-Maglite: Swapped from the regular globe to LED to conserve the batteries if needed. And on that, the batteries in the Maglite and the laser pointer are both positive-to-positive to prevent inadvertent activation and are long-life lithium batteries.
  • Green Laser pointer: Can be seen for miles at night, even without directly aimed at an aircraft.
The survival & first aid kits themselves are housed in small tins sourced from the local electronic retailer designed to house small PCB's.



Contents of the first aid kit, from the upper left pocket:


And contents of the survival kit, from the left hip pouch:
__________________
Once you have tasted flight you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards, for there you have been and there you will long to return - Leonardo DaVinci

My Flickr gallery: http://www.flickr.com/photos/35521362@N06/

RV-9A 19-8519 - Finished on 10th February 2016 after 4 years, 9 months and 19 days! The 1020th RV-9 flying.

First flight 26th March 2016. Phase I done. Essential specs 145KTAS @ 2400RPM, 8000', 24.2LPH, Initial RoC 1800FPM.

Last edited by KRviator : 06-18-2018 at 08:57 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 06-18-2018, 10:04 PM
jcarne's Avatar
jcarne jcarne is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Worland, Wyoming
Posts: 483
Default

Thanks for posting the update! I learned something new too, I always wondered what would happen if you ran a tank dry. I thought it would go into vapor lock but apparently not. Interesting
__________________
Jereme Carne
PPL
RV-7A Emp. done
Wings mostly done
Working on Fuselage
Finish kit on order
Exempt but gladly paying!
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 06-18-2018, 10:10 PM
RV8JD's Avatar
RV8JD RV8JD is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 799
Default From AFP for FI Systems

Quote:
Originally Posted by jcarne View Post
Thanks for posting the update! I learned something new too, I always wondered what would happen if you ran a tank dry. I thought it would go into vapor lock but apparently not. Interesting
Check out this thread:

http://www.vansairforce.com/communit...d.php?t=156413

And this warning from AFP:
"WARNING

Airflow Performance and Bendix/Precision fuel injection systems are non-returning systems. In the event that a tank is run dry in flight, an air lock will be formed on the out let of the pumps. It is possible that the auxiliary pump will not pick up fuel, as the auxiliary pump cannot create enough air pressure to over come the flow divider opening pressure, thus displacing the air and resume pumping fuel. It is not recommended to run a fuel tank dry in flight without adequate testing and proper documentation of the procedure for this operation."
So try it safely before you need it.
__________________
Carl N.
Arlington, WA (KAWO)
RV-8, 340 Tach Hours
(Pic 1),(Pic 2)
- Out with the Old, In with the New
(Pic)
RV-8, 1938 Tach Hours (Pic 1),(Pic 2) - Sold

Glasflügel Standard Libelle 201B, N564NS - Sold
Rolladen-Schneider LS1-f, N61MP - No longer owned
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 06-18-2018, 10:22 PM
KRviator's Avatar
KRviator KRviator is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sydney, Aust.
Posts: 694
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jcarne View Post
Thanks for posting the update! I learned something new too, I always wondered what would happen if you ran a tank dry. I thought it would go into vapor lock but apparently not. Interesting
It is not recommended for EFI systems, but if you fly a "modern" FAR 23-certified aircraft, they're actually designed to permit it without any surprises.

Quote:
FAR 23.955 Multiple fuel tanks. For reciprocating engines that are supplied with fuel from more than one tank, if engine power loss becomes apparent due to fuel depletion from the tank selected, it must be possible after switching to any full tank, in level flight, to obtain 75 percent maximum continuous power on that engine in not more than -

(1) 10 seconds for naturally aspirated single engine airplanes;
(2) 20 seconds for turbocharged single engine airplanes, provided that 75 percent maximum continuous naturally aspirated power is regained within 10 seconds; or

(3) 20 seconds for multiengine airplanes.
__________________
Once you have tasted flight you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards, for there you have been and there you will long to return - Leonardo DaVinci

My Flickr gallery: http://www.flickr.com/photos/35521362@N06/

RV-9A 19-8519 - Finished on 10th February 2016 after 4 years, 9 months and 19 days! The 1020th RV-9 flying.

First flight 26th March 2016. Phase I done. Essential specs 145KTAS @ 2400RPM, 8000', 24.2LPH, Initial RoC 1800FPM.
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 06-21-2018, 03:00 PM
jcarne's Avatar
jcarne jcarne is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Worland, Wyoming
Posts: 483
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RV8JD View Post
Check out this thread:

http://www.vansairforce.com/communit...d.php?t=156413

And this warning from AFP:
"WARNING

Airflow Performance and Bendix/Precision fuel injection systems are non-returning systems. In the event that a tank is run dry in flight, an air lock will be formed on the out let of the pumps. It is possible that the auxiliary pump will not pick up fuel, as the auxiliary pump cannot create enough air pressure to over come the flow divider opening pressure, thus displacing the air and resume pumping fuel. It is not recommended to run a fuel tank dry in flight without adequate testing and proper documentation of the procedure for this operation."
So try it safely before you need it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by KRviator View Post
It is not recommended for EFI systems, but if you fly a "modern" FAR 23-certified aircraft, they're actually designed to permit it without any surprises.
Thanks for the info and links. Sorry to hijack the thread a little bit.
__________________
Jereme Carne
PPL
RV-7A Emp. done
Wings mostly done
Working on Fuselage
Finish kit on order
Exempt but gladly paying!
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:37 PM.


The VAFForums come to you courtesy Delta Romeo, LLC. By viewing and participating in them you agree to build your plane using standardized methods and practices and to fly it safely and in accordance with the laws governing the country you are located in.