VansAirForceForums  
Home > VansAirForceForums

- POSTING RULES
- Donate yearly (please).
- Advertise in here!

- Today's Posts | Insert Pics


Go Back   VAF Forums > Main > RV General Discussion/News
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-28-2006, 10:39 PM
N79PT N79PT is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 81
Default Who wears a parachute in the RV?

Curious how many do and don't wear a 'chute when doing acro. If you don't wear one, why? Any good models to reccomend for the RV? I haven't done any acro in my new 6, but I will soon. Thanks for the info. --Greg
__________________
Greg Grigson
Yellow Peril / RV-6A SOLD
Albuquerque, New Mexico
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 04-28-2006, 11:28 PM
AntiGravity's Avatar
AntiGravity AntiGravity is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Hamilton, New Zealand
Posts: 632
Default I'm in

Call me paranoid, but I'll always be wearing one in my RV-8A, acro or not. Of course, as a skydiver I'm used to it. In fact, I feel decidedly uncomfortable in small aircraft when I don't have a rig on.

Food for thought though; the guy that recently bailed from his aerobatic aircraft after a control malfunction. It was on Avweb and posted here; can't remember the details. But note that he bailed after discovering an issue just after take-off, and before any aeros. The fact he was an earobatic pilot in an arobatic plane isn't really relevant to the time and circumstances in which he had to bail...
__________________
Jeff Preou
Hamilton, New Zealand
STATUS: not building anything at all... yet ...
http://www.preou.com
http://www.kitlog.com/users/index.php?user=jpreou
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-28-2006, 11:31 PM
kevinh's Avatar
kevinh kevinh is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: San Mateo, CA
Posts: 1,419
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Grigson
Curious how many do and don't wear a 'chute when doing acro. If you don't wear one, why? Any good models to reccomend for the RV? I haven't done any acro in my new 6, but I will soon. Thanks for the info.
I'm just about to start acro in my RV - pick up my chutes from the rigger soon. I will be wearing a chute when doing acro. It's required when you have a passenger (unless you somehow can claim them as crew?). Since most of the times I have a passenger, I might as well build a habit of wearing it.

Has anyone ever bailed out of an RV? I don't think so. (true?) However, a long time ago I decided I was going to obey all the regs and fly safe (two different things, but I try to do them both).

Quote:
Any good models to reccomend for the RV?
From wearing a few diffrent Softie chutes and a Strong parachute, it seems like the softie is a bit nicer. That said, I purchased two Strong chutes because I found two people here who were looking to sell theirs.

Ask around on this site before buying new. It seems like a fair number of folks have chutes they own that they are not using and are willing to sell. A modern chute that fits your RV seat should be almost 'as good as new' if it is only a few years old and stored well. A used chute from an honest RV pilot can save lots of money.
__________________
-kevinh, Track my RV-7A, flying, alas, sold in 2013 after 450ish hours. (I'm now building something different)

Last edited by kevinh : 04-30-2006 at 07:19 PM. Reason: spelling
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 04-29-2006, 04:09 AM
rv8ch rv8ch is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: LSGG
Posts: 2,494
Default Need to punch

Quote:
Originally Posted by AntiGravity
Food for thought though; the guy that recently bailed from his aerobatic aircraft after a control malfunction. It was on Avweb and posted here; can't remember the details. But note that he bailed after discovering an issue just after take-off, and before any aeros. The fact he was an earobatic pilot in an arobatic plane isn't really relevant to the time and circumstances in which he had to bail...
Just today I read about an RV8 having trouble at takeoff. Some stuff in the cockpit started interfering with the rudder pedals and the control column.

http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief2.asp?...05LA072&akey=1

Having something jam the contols in flight could be a good reason to bail out. I know of course that an uncontrolled engine fire would also be a good reason to punch. However, based on my reading of NTSB reports, these are very rare events.
__________________
Mickey Coggins
http://rv8.ch
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 04-29-2006, 07:14 AM
Dgamble's Avatar
Dgamble Dgamble is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 822
Default Thought about it, but...

I'm not convinced I could get the tip-up canopy open in flight. I have the release lever, but I'm not clear on how that does anything meaningful when I have two gas struts firmly bolted to the canopy and side rails.
__________________
Dave Gamble
Grove City, OH

RV-6 N466PG Purchased already flying - SOLD!

Built RV-12
http://www.schmetterlingaviation.com

The above web blogs and any links provided thereto are not instructional or advisory in nature. They merely seek to share my experiences in building and flying Van's RV airplanes.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 04-29-2006, 07:16 AM
Ironflight's Avatar
Ironflight Ironflight is offline
VAF Moderator / Line Boy
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Dayton, NV
Posts: 11,867
Default Back to the original question...

When I was preparing for flight testing, the only reasons I could think of for leaving the aircraft in flight were structural failure, loss of control capability, or fire. If you do some archive searching on the appropriate RV web sites, you can find considerable debate on whether or not it is possible to get out of an -8 in flight, but I figured that if I had no other choice, I'd at least go down trying! I have quick-release pins on my canopy rollers, just in case.

I wear a chute in the -8 primarily when I am exploring a flight regime which is new. That means that during flight testing, I wore it all the time until I had done all of my V-N envelope expansion (G-loading), and then again when I was testing it for the aerobatic manuevers that I wanted to put in the log-book at sign-off. Once I got comfortable with the aircraft during flight test, I stopped wearing the chute for performance test flights and the like.

Once I had proven to myself that the plane (and myself) could do certain manuevers safely and well within limits, I have no problems with the occasional roll, loop, or split-S when the mood strikes me, regardless of whether I have the chute on (and assuming that I am solo - I believe in following the rules!). But if I am going to try something new that could conceivably put me into one of my bail-out criteria (I did some additional spin work recently for instance), I take out the seat cushion, and strap on the chute and helmet.

Just one person's Ops Concept....

Paul
__________________
Paul F. Dye
Editor at Large - KITPLANES Magazine
RV-8 - N188PD - "Valkyrie"
RV-6 (By Marriage) - N164MS - "Mikey"
RV-3B - N13PL - "Tsamsiyu"
A&P, EAA Tech Counselor/Flight Advisor
Dayton Valley Airpark (A34)
http://Ironflight.com
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 04-29-2006, 07:18 AM
chuck chuck is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Kirland, WA
Posts: 200
Default

I have an RV-4. Every flight I fly I do at least a little acro, except at night of course. I also fly many hours a year of formation. I don't like wearing the backpack chute AND having the seatback in place so I have taken to only flying with the chute. I have an oregon aero seatback on the shelf in the hangar. With the sheepskin pad I find the backpack chute works well on long x-countries just fine.

As for the claim that the need for an chute is minimal that is true, but I look at it as a poor man's BRS. I'd sure hate to wish I had the chute when it was lying on the shelf in hangar.

Chuck
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 04-29-2006, 07:43 AM
Mel's Avatar
Mel Mel is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Dallas area
Posts: 10,304
Default

I wear a chute when doing acro in my -6. My chute is 22 years old but has never been opened in flight and is stored in the closet when not in use. If you have a tip-up, you must remove the gas struts to utilize the canopy jettison. Mine was built before the gas struts and has the original latch which isn't attached with the canopy closed. If you have a slider, I'm sure you can't open it in flight anyway. I also wear the chute while flight testing. But I don't so as much of that as I used to.
Mel...DAR
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 04-29-2006, 07:46 AM
pierre smith's Avatar
pierre smith pierre smith is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Louisville, Ga
Posts: 7,824
Default Can't get out

This thread was discussed a couple of years ago and the consensus was that you CANNOT open a slider RV6 or RV7 in flight so wearing a parachute is moot. Aerobatic gross weight means solo-dual is too heavy for acro.

My concern was getting out after an engine failure and opening the canopy just before touchdown so you weren't trapped upside down (worse in a tip-up) and have to face fire. I was told many times that you cannot open a slider 6 or 7 in flight and earlier this year offered to pay for a canopy if someone tried and managed it in flight.

One guy DID open an RV8 a few years ago during an inflight fire that came into the cabin and he jumped WITHOUT a chute. Yes, RV8s apparently can be opened in flight.
Pierre
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 04-29-2006, 08:56 AM
chuck chuck is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Kirland, WA
Posts: 200
Default

When calculating acro weight, don't include fuel.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:02 AM.


The VAFForums come to you courtesy Delta Romeo, LLC. By viewing and participating in them you agree to build your plane using standardized methods and practices and to fly it safely and in accordance with the laws governing the country you are located in.