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  #1  
Old 07-19-2008, 05:01 PM
JohnRLewis JohnRLewis is offline
 
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Default Why do most professional panels use circuit breakers?

Not building anything yet. Still dreaming.

I've read lots of information from http://www.aeroelectric.com/, and tend to like those designes. Keep things simple, use fuses instead of circuit breakers, etc. All of that makes sense. Some builders follow those ideas, some do not.

But the thing that strikes me, is that nearly all the photos that I've seen of professionally built panels devote a huge chunk of real estate to circuit breakers. Why? Is it just so that they look like a certified panel? Is there something wrong with the electrical system designs on http://www.aeroelectric.com/ that I should know about?
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  #2  
Old 07-19-2008, 05:34 PM
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robertahegy robertahegy is offline
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I built my panel and used about 25+ circuit breakers to protect all the electrical devices. I would prefer to just push the breaker in to reset the circuit as opposed to trying to find the correct fuse and replace it while in flight. Other opinions may differ.

Fuses and holders also take up real estate and, if remotely located, will be a real pain to replace in flight. Your plane, your choice.

Roberta
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  #3  
Old 07-19-2008, 05:37 PM
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N941WR N941WR is offline
 
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John,

Check out this thread.

There are over 11 pages dedicated to this topic.
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  #4  
Old 07-19-2008, 05:42 PM
JohnRLewis JohnRLewis is offline
 
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Default Yes, but what about electrical fire safety?

Quote:
Originally Posted by robertahegy View Post
Fuses and holders also take up real estate and, if remotely located, will be a real pain to replace in flight.
True, but the way I understand the idea is that one should not be playing mechanic while flying anyway. If a circuit got overloaded, should you really be resetting it in flight? Isn't it better to get on the ground first? If the circuit breakers or fuses are properly sized for the wires, and they get overloaded, resetting a breaker or replacing a fuse makes for the potential for an electrical fire. If there are nuisance trips because there is too much load on a particular circuit, then something needs to be redesigned behind the panel anyway.

Quote:
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Your plane, your choice.
Yes, I'm just trying to understand the issue better so that I can make the right choice someday.
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  #5  
Old 07-19-2008, 05:46 PM
JohnRLewis JohnRLewis is offline
 
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Default Lets not start that debate again...

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Originally Posted by N941WR View Post
John,

Check out this thread.

There are over 11 pages dedicated to this topic.
I dont think I want to start that debate all over again. But am curious why most professional panel builders are choosing to use circuit breakers.
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  #6  
Old 07-19-2008, 06:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnRLewis View Post
snip . . .. But am curious why most professional panel builders are choosing to use circuit breakers.
It looks cool and cost way more money.

I used breakers for everything essential to flight (fuel pump, EI, Avionics master, flaps, alt field(although I decided I would never use it in flight), auto pilot, switched breaker for trim (Pilot side for trim cutoff)).

Everything else, fused. My logic either I can fly without it, or example, if my 430W popped a breaker, I am going to have it checked out before I power it back up. Altogether, 22 fuses and 8 breakers. I know, I am over protected. But. as Roberta said " Your plane, your choice."

I think I am about to get fined by the thread police.
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  #7  
Old 07-19-2008, 06:45 PM
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I used both. Breakers for items I might want to isolate or reset, and fuses to protect items I probably wouldn't reset in flight anyway.

L.Adamson -- RV6A
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  #8  
Old 07-19-2008, 07:22 PM
szicree szicree is offline
 
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I think the answer to your question is that most professionals use breakers cuz most professionals use breakers. It's the same reason your doctor prescribes the exact same meds as the next doc. Pros know that the best way to stay out of legal trouble is to go with conventional wisdom.
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  #9  
Old 07-19-2008, 07:35 PM
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Because the Vertical Power system wasn't on the market when those panels were built.
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  #10  
Old 07-19-2008, 07:42 PM
Rivethead Rivethead is offline
 
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Being that I've just about finished all the wiring to my fuse block I'll give you my perspective. A fuse block is bulky and for me it almost impossible to locate in a reasonable location. Once located however I felt it was a winner location and now that it is mostly wired I still think it's a winner. However, circuit breakers have the advantage of compactness. Push to reset type breakers can be placed in just about any open real estate on the panel with just a little planning for wire routing. Combo switch/circuit breakers are the best of both worlds from what I can see, although expensive. My biggest reason and almost the only reason for not going the circuit breaker route was that I couldn't find a way around having a rather exposed hot buss somewhere inside the cabin. Fuse blocks serve as that buss with the main power going directly to the block first and of course the block is manufactured as a well insulated item. A reason for certified builders to choose breakers may be that the buying public has certain expectations.

Last edited by Rivethead : 07-19-2008 at 07:44 PM.
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