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  #1  
Old 06-06-2005, 05:25 PM
atreff's Avatar
atreff atreff is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 215
Default CFM for paint booth exhaust fan?

To those who have built their own paint booth, what do paint professionals recommend on how much air exchange is needed? I've found a 3100 CFM explosion proof fan:

http://www.sprayshield.com/

So, my question is how many air exchanges per minute do paint professionals recommend? Any ideas? I've found nothing in Ron Alexander's book, nor in Sam James Painting 101. In a booth 20'x12'x8', a 3100 CFM fan will provide 1.6 air exchanges per minute, not sure if that's too much or too little.

Art
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  #2  
Old 06-07-2005, 10:48 AM
PapillonAir PapillonAir is offline
 
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Posts: 14
Default Home made paint booths

I painted my "6" in my garage by installing a 2500 cfm explosion proof exhaust fan, with a paper filter frame "box" on the end of the ducted intake. I just put plastic sheeting up all around the garage walls and overhead. I installed a screen door on the small personnel door opening of the garage then duct taped on a bunch of home HVAC air filters on the outside surface of the screen door. This filtered the intake air, an allowed a sufficient air intake area without cutting down my flow too much. I believe I calculated that my air changes were going to be about 1-2 changes per minute.
I was glad that I captured my overspray in the paper paint filters before letting it get outside as to not let it get on neighbors cars or my own for that matter.
On two other topics - for what it is worth...
I installed a total of 6000 watts of light and that was still not enough - the more light the better!
I switched over to the gravity feed HVLP spray gun - which feeds off a regular air hose, instead of the turbine deal. Glad I did this too.
You absolutly need a full face fresh air supplied respirator! and nothing less!
You can see my "6" on the Centennial Homebuilt section of the EAA website under "wittman" RV-6 if you like.
If you have further painting questions, drop me an email dwittman_at_sonoma-county.org
Good luck
Dale
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  #3  
Old 06-07-2005, 12:36 PM
RV10Pilot RV10Pilot is offline
 
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Location: Medford, NJ USA
Posts: 51
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PapillonAir
You absolutly need a full face fresh air supplied respirator! and nothing less!
Dale,
Do you have a source for the full face air supplied respirator?

Larry
RV10 #356
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  #4  
Old 06-07-2005, 04:44 PM
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robertahegy robertahegy is offline
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Location: East Troy, WI
Posts: 1,837
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The half mask with a hood is also acceptable. They are available in cloth or tyvex material and you can get replaceable lense protectors to keep overspray off the hood lense. I find the hood and half mask much more comfy tham the full mask. Keeps my hair from becoming the same color as my projects, too.

For a home made spray booth (10 X10 X 20 feet) I used a 20" box fan and furnace filters and blew the air into the booth. That way an explosion proof fan is not necessary, cause you do not draw fumes across the motor. I used filters on the fan and had an exit filter. Worked fine.

Roberta
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  #5  
Old 06-08-2005, 10:11 AM
PapillonAir PapillonAir is offline
 
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Posts: 14
Default Full Face Resp Source

I got the "hobby-air" system often advertised on the VAF site. I just got the simple one without the dual system to also drive a paint gun. I did "upsize" the system a little to allow a helper mask if needed, but turned out I did not.
I liked the full face system with a tyvek coverall with tight hood as opposed to a loose hood/head gear set up. The full face systems have tear off lenses that keep the glass clean, and the tight hood on the coverall stays with you nicely and keeps paint off hair. The important thing of a full face is that many of those paint toxins can enter your body through the eyes too.
Use what you like.
Dale
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  #6  
Old 06-08-2005, 08:19 PM
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atreff atreff is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 215
Default Where to put paint booth

Roberta and gang,

Thx for the quick replies, it all helps. I'm moving to a new house soon, and the garage is below the main house as part of the basement, not in a seperate building. It will be seperated by 5/8" drywall and all the other building code stuff for seperating garages from living areas. The ceiling will be 9' off the floor, so tons of room to circulate air around the booth and out the door.

So, when you all rolled your own paint booth out of plastic, was there still obvious paint fumes all over the place outside the plastic? Enough so that if your garage were under your house, you'd make the rest of the fam' crazy smelling the fumes?

If so, I guess I'll have to construct my booth outside in the driveway, which could mean I'll have to spend a few $100 more and buy one of those portable garages from JC Whitney, and seal that up.

Thanks again,
Art in Asheville, NC
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  #7  
Old 06-08-2005, 11:07 PM
rvdave rvdave is online now
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 62
Default do I need an explosion proof fan

I'm wondering if I really need that explosion proof fan? I am aware of and have seen fires in garages where people have been working with gasoline products, snowmobiles, lawnmowers and the fuel is the gasoline and any spark nearby is hazardous. Contrasting that to semiflammable(?) paint fumes where you are diluting those fumes with fresh air through filters is there really a cause for concern using a few of the cheap box fans? Let me know what you think.

Dave Ford
RV6 getting ready to paint
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  #8  
Old 06-09-2005, 01:30 AM
Mustang Mustang is offline
 
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Location: Vancouver, B.C.
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I've been painting in my basement garage for the last three years. The top two floors have never smelled paint during that time. How I did it was; Installed a stock box fan. Whenever I painted, I installed the fan butted right up against the window which was screened. Then I blocked off the rest of the window not covered by the box fan with plywood. Before painting I would start up the fan and run it until the paint was basically cured. The fan would suck air out of the rest of the house which would stop any fumes from seeping into the living area. I kept the door to the basement blocked open to assure a steady supply of fairly clean air. For finish painting, the doorway could be blocked with a full size filter to keep out the specs from your paintjob.

Cheers, Pete
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  #9  
Old 06-09-2005, 07:09 AM
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atreff atreff is offline
 
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Posts: 215
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Pete,

Thx for the tip. Just want to understand your setup. So, you have a plastic sheet home made paint booth to put the plane parts in. I assume that that has the usual box fan with furance filters inside to keep the dust down and vent the overspray.

And the box fan you put in the window is outside you paint booth?

Art
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  #10  
Old 06-09-2005, 07:20 PM
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robertahegy robertahegy is offline
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Location: East Troy, WI
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Here are some shots of my spraybooth. I made two wooden frames to hold the furnace filters. Vinyl siding "J" channels where attached to the frames so I could slide replacement filters in as they got loaded with paint. One frame was attached to the box fan and the "J" channels sandwiched the plastic sheeting to seal the whole frame, filter and fan assembly. The other frame was attached to the plastic with "J" channels to mount the exhaust filter.

I blew filtered air into the booth to provide positive pressure to keep dirt from getting sucked in. This also kept fumes from going through the fan motor, lessening the chance for a fire or explosion.

Flood lights attached to firring strips provided light on the sides and I hung several flourescent shop lights from the ceiling.

I used 4 mil plastic for the walls and attached it to the framework made from 2" PVC. I used tape, tiewraps and clips to hole the plastic in place and used a large zipper from Home Depot for the door closure.

This booth was built in our hangar, which is attached to our home. During painting, the hangar door was cracked to allow the fumes to exhaust out the hangar door. We move our cars out to keep any overspray that might escape off of them. Paint fumes did not linger and did not intrude into the house. After painting, were were able to safely close the hangar door to maintain heat during winter painting sessions (we live in Wisconsin). We had no problems with fumes or paint getting on anything in the garage/hangar. The booth kept the paint contained and the plane parts clean during painting.

I successfully painted two airplanes this way. My SeaRey was awarded "Outstanding Homebuilt Seaplane" at EAA '02.

I used a Citation HVLP unit with fresh air supply. I liked using the half mask under a hood. The positive pressure under the hood kept all paint and fumes out and I never smelled any paint while in the booth using this setup.

The whole thing cost less that 300 bucks, including wiring and lighting.

Hope this helps and good luck with your paint project.

Roberta



This is an overview of the booth in our hangar.



This is looking into the booth. The fan and filter are just fastened to the plastic with the "J" channels and the fan sets on some blocks. Keep it simple and cheap.



This is looking out the booth. You can see the exhaust filter and the wood frame that holds it.



Here is a shot of the fuselage being prepped in the booth. You can see the zipper for closing the booth.
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