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  #1  
Old 10-10-2018, 08:50 AM
Bartman14 Bartman14 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: Pikeville, KY
Posts: 2
Default Building in 2 locations

First post and first time builder. Awesome community here !
After researching the 10 and 14 on this and other sites and blogs for about 6 weeks I settled on building the 14A. Since I work week on week off I have the time, but the work location is in a different city about 100 miles away. Should have a good 10-14 days relatively uninterrupted at home every month, and a couple of hours most days while away. Looking at maximizing my time and thinking of buying two kit segments and working on the empennage while away and haul it back when completed, but do the big stuff at the main home. Completed segments will be stored and assembled in my hangar a few miles from the main home. I know I'll have some duplication of tools and workspace but many tools can be hauled back and forth. Excuse my ignorance, but is it reasonable to build the empennage and maybe other portions in a townhouse community away from the main home, or would I just be setting myself and the neighbors up for a bad experience with complaints like noise and such ?
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  #2  
Old 10-10-2018, 10:17 AM
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JonJay JonJay is offline
 
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Location: Battleground
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It is a noisy, and dirty, process.

I have a shop 2 miles from my home hangar. I have a complete set of tools at the home hangar, but the shop has far more. I am constantly in need of a some odd ball tool that I left at the shop. A lot of back and forth.

Also, you want to minimize the amount of handling of your parts. You will see many posts here where folks dropped something while hauling it, or moving it.
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  #3  
Old 10-10-2018, 11:15 AM
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Vlad Vlad is offline
 
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In my opinion not practical. If I read correctly with the hangar you have three locations. The most efficient time spent on the project would be in the shop in your main house. While you surely can haul parts and tools to townhouse and back it’s a time consuming work without real work on airframe.

Spend your extra couple hours after major work researching and reading drawings, plan what task you accomplish next and accomplish it in two weeks. Study plans, deburr a bracket, crimp a thing or two, dream, if you stay on it every day expect your first flight in 1,000 days. Or a week earlier...

You can control dirt while building but you can’t control noise. I built my empennage in a small NYC studio apt and I had visitors after first dozen rivets. I still remember carrying parts with me on subway car to a graveyard shift at work. Cops were often curious what I carry in that giant bag after midnight. Unzip - wheel fairings and some epoxy.

Welcome to the obsession you will enjoy the building. I know, I had.
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  #4  
Old 10-10-2018, 01:17 PM
StressedOut StressedOut is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Fullerton, CA
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I'm building my -14A in half of a two car garage. I live in a condo complex and spent a considerable amount of brainpower figuring out how to do this without being "that guy" who bothers my neighbors.

My biggest concern was noise. Some things you do in building are noisy and you just can't do much about it, but I've made the effort to minimize it. For example, I got a very quiet air compressor made by California Air Tools. It was a little more expensive, but in my opinion well worth it.

I bought a pneumatic squeezer and do as much riveting as I can with it. I makes very little noise, save for the nasty language when I clench a rivet. I'm also using the DRDT-2 press dimpler. No banging noises and despite hearing some claims it doesn't make dimples as good as a C-frame I've yet to see the difference.

Those operations that are going to be noisy no matter what (e.g. band saw, grinding and deburring on the bench grinder, sanding with the bench belt sander, etc.) I do on weekends in the middle of the day.

So far my neighbors are not bothered by the occasional bout of noise. I get visits often by them to see my progress.
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RV-14A Kit#140433
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  #5  
Old 10-10-2018, 01:34 PM
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Mike S Mike S is offline
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Location: Dayton Airpark, NV A34
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Default Welcome to VAF

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bartman14 View Post
First post and first time builder. Awesome community here !
Jamie, welcome to VAF
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  #6  
Old 10-10-2018, 05:40 PM
Bartman14 Bartman14 is offline
 
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Location: Pikeville, KY
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Thanks for the replies, advice and the welcome.
Building the home garage workspace for now.
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  #7  
Old 10-10-2018, 06:25 PM
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Ironflight Ironflight is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vlad View Post
Spend your extra couple hours after major work researching and reading drawings, plan what task you accomplish next and accomplish it in two weeks. Study plans, deburr a bracket, crimp a thing or two, dream, if you stay on it every day expect your first flight in 1,000 days. Or a week earlier...
Vlad has it right here. Most people that keep track of their build time (can I see a show of hands engineers?!) track only time in the shop. If they were honest, they'd probably log at least half as much additional time doing research, looking at plans, and purchasing. There is a whole lot of that to do.

My latest kit project is being shipped at the end of next week - I ordered it in July, and probably have spent several hundred hours already "working" on it....and don't yet have any parts!

Paul
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  #8  
Old 10-10-2018, 06:37 PM
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Mike S Mike S is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ironflight View Post

My latest kit project is being shipped at the end of next week - I ordered it in July, and probably have spent several hundred hours already "working" on it....and don't yet have any parts!

Paul
Very similar scenario to Paul, kit due in Dec------already grabbing parts here on VAF. Many hours of planning already spent on panel layout and systems design.

I spend at least half of my time pondering things compared to actually hands on work.

But------not being an engineer, I do not count dollars or time
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VAF 909

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Flying as of 12/4/2010

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Sold after 240+ wonderful hours of flight.

"Flying the airplane is more important than radioing your plight to a person on the ground incapable of understanding or doing anything about it."
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  #9  
Old 10-10-2018, 07:43 PM
David Paule David Paule is offline
 
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Location: Boulder, CO
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If you decide to do that, how about this: Instead of trying to build some things here and some things there, do some common tasks that can be done on the part level at the smaller facility. Things like deburring or sorting hardware or even priming. Then assembly will happen at the main place.

That way tools aren't duplicated as much and since you'll be working on pieces, they can be stopped and picked up again later without much impact. Also, you'll be hauling around pieces rather than major airplane parts. If something's damaged in the transportation, it's a smaller impact.

Dave
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  #10  
Old 10-10-2018, 07:46 PM
Stockmanreef Stockmanreef is offline
 
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Location: Midland, mi
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Maybe you could build the panel at other location?
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