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  #1  
Old 12-28-2017, 03:43 AM
74-07 74-07 is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Greenville, SC
Posts: 146
Default Working inside fuselage - 2nd owner

Ok guys, I have searched this and found a few suggestions but we're doing several upgrades to our RV-7 and we're going to have to run additional wiring through the aft fuselage. This is going to involve drilling additional holes in the bulkheads (yes, I've checked with Van's), installing snap bushings and then running the wires. I've recruited the mandatory extra skinny guy and we're going to do it within the next two or three days. I bought pipe insulation tubes to put over the bulkheads but now, I'm trying to decide the best thing to use as a platform. 1/2" plywood sure seems heavy and cumbersome and could potentially do damage. Anybody got any better ideas?
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Old 12-28-2017, 04:02 AM
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humptybump humptybump is offline
 
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The first major project on my RV-8, I went through a similar debate. The RV-8 is even more restrictive. My solution was to get some heavy upholstery cloth and make two long fat “bean bags” filled with packing peanuts. Each “bag” is about 24” wide and 54” long. These contour to all the intrusions.

Write-up here -> http://elder.ninja/blog/p/4814
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Last edited by humptybump : 12-28-2017 at 05:57 AM.
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  #3  
Old 12-28-2017, 05:04 AM
Bevan Bevan is offline
 
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Location: BC
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I have a piece of 5/8 plywood cut to approximate the floor of the baggage area. This goes down first to protect the baggage floor from point loads like feet and knees. Then a piece of 2x10 lays on that and into the rear fuse across to the next bulkhead. That one is about 5 foot long or so. Not sure, itís been a while. If I need to go further, a piece of 5/8 x 10 plywood to the next bulkhead.

This is for a sliding canopy RV7A. A tip up canopy aircraft may be harder to get the lumber in there.

Caution, if itís a tri-gear, you may need to support the tail before the helper crawls in there. A custom height sawhorse should do.

Also, you may want a small fan to push air through for the willing victim. It gets warm in there fast particularly if you have a hot light in there.

Proceed with caution so as not to require the assistance of the FD for extraction.

Bevan.
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Old 12-28-2017, 05:45 AM
74-07 74-07 is offline
 
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Location: Greenville, SC
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Default RV-7

It's a tip up taildragger

Thanks
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  #5  
Old 12-28-2017, 06:24 AM
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Sam Buchanan Sam Buchanan is offline
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There are no silver bullets here, just use common sense. Your 1/2" ply over the pipe insulation is probably about as good as it gets. Get everything lined up that you need so your helper won't get stranded while you go find something. LED lighting is best because it won't generate heat.

You are doing this the easy way with two people....I usually have to make multiple trips down the tunnel because I forgot something....
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Old 12-28-2017, 06:36 AM
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bret bret is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Buchanan View Post
There are no silver bullets here, just use common sense. Your 1/2" ply over the pipe insulation is probably about as good as it gets. Get everything lined up that you need so your helper won't get stranded while you go find something. LED lighting is best because it won't generate heat.

You are doing this the easy way with two people....I usually have to make multiple trips down the tunnel because I forgot something....
Unless you are working in an unheated area, Then the 500 Watt halogen lamp is your best friend
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  #7  
Old 12-28-2017, 06:47 AM
6 Gun 6 Gun is offline
 
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Posts: 827
Cool wires

I just changed from manual trim to electric and installed autopilot didn't have room to run wires through bottom bulkheads so I used holes were manual trim ran down left side of fuse painted a piece of CPVC 1/2" pipe inserted through manual trim holes above arm rest and ran lots of wires just saying all this to let you know if you didn't have manual trim that you could go high with wires instead of under.
Bob
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Old 12-28-2017, 07:03 AM
BillL BillL is offline
 
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Location: Central IL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Buchanan View Post
There are no silver bullets here, just use common sense. Your 1/2" ply over the pipe insulation is probably about as good as it gets. Get everything lined up that you need so your helper won't get stranded while you go find something. LED lighting is best because it won't generate heat.

You are doing this the easy way with two people....I usually have to make multiple trips down the tunnel because I forgot something....
+1 - the voice of experience. I am the skinny (and forgetful) guy.
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  #9  
Old 12-28-2017, 08:54 AM
RV7 To Go RV7 To Go is offline
 
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Location: Ontario, Canada
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Default Tunnelling

I used 1" thick blue styrofoam on the floors and old pillows over the bulkheads when crawling back in my 7 tipper. The foam is solid enough so you won't dent but flexible enough for the curves. Prop the the tail up with a sawhorse under the front of the tail spring bracket to make it easier to get out. Careful on the weight at the front so you don't nose over (I keep mine a little lower than level for that reason). Always nice to have a gopher on the outside! Have fun!
Al

Last edited by RV7 To Go : 12-28-2017 at 08:56 AM. Reason: Corrected autocorrect.
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  #10  
Old 12-28-2017, 09:26 AM
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Ironflight Ironflight is offline
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Nothing in the RV universe is smaller than a -3.....

When we were building ours, we filled the spaces between bulkheads with pillow (or pillow-like objects), then used thick moving blankets folded up into long, skinny (12") platforms that took the body over teh bulkheads themselves. This combination spread the load pretty well, and made it somewhat comfortable.

Remove the empennage fairing to allow some breeze through the fuselage as well!
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