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  #1  
Old 12-12-2006, 06:53 PM
glenn72pc glenn72pc is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Ft. Myers, FL
Posts: 52
Default RV-10 Auxiliary Fuel Tanks

I'm looking to build an RV 10. 60 gallons of fuel is inadequate for the way I plan to use the plane. Is anyone aware of any tip tanks or auxilliary fuel tanks for this aircraft?
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  #2  
Old 12-12-2006, 07:45 PM
Alex D Alex D is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 109
Default Fuel Tanks

Check out www.safeair1.com they sell extended fuel tanks for the RV 10.
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  #3  
Old 12-13-2006, 05:25 AM
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rleffler rleffler is offline
 
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Location: Delaware, OH (KDLZ)
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Anyone flying with these tanks yet?

I'm curious as to if they turn the 10 into a 2 place a/c due to the addtional weight.
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  #4  
Old 12-13-2006, 06:11 AM
vic syracuse vic syracuse is offline
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Location: Locust Grove, GA
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Hello Bob. I have the Safair tanks on my 10. They give me piece of mind for the really long 3.5 hour+ IFR flights. Even with fuel full up, at Van's specified gross weight, there is still room for 3x 200lb people. I don't use them all of the time, and the RV-10 is really a true 4-place airplane. Sometimes I'll use them to avoid the high cost of gas at the destination. I'm sure we'll get all kinds of formulas now about how much fuel burn it takes to tanker the fuel but that's just the way I operate. And of course you can always throttle back and not burn as much fuel. Lots of options. YMMV.

Vic
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  #5  
Old 12-13-2006, 02:56 PM
RV10builder RV10builder is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 9
Default Funny, but actually serious, question

I can appreciate the need/desire to have extended range tanks. However, mother nature only gave my bladder so much range. Easy enough for me to find relief, hence the Gatorade bottle in my flight bag, but do the women that fly with you also have "extended range" or is there a product for that part of the equation as well?
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  #6  
Old 12-13-2006, 03:05 PM
vic syracuse vic syracuse is offline
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We never push the flight such that biological concerns get uncomfortable. On the longer trips, we tend to fly higher, 10K'-12K', and I don't know if it is the altitude that tends to dehydrate or eliminate the need for the bathroom, but something works. We haven't done the gatorade bottle, or other relief items. Probably as we get older the longer flights might not work. Part of the preflight for everyone is to go to the bathroom.
Of course, planning the flight weatherwise so it is very boring and everyone can watch movies or listen to music helps. Scary flights weatherwise can increase the urge.

Vic
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  #7  
Old 12-13-2006, 07:01 PM
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johngoodman johngoodman is offline
 
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Location: Peachtree City, Georgia
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Vic,
A couple of questions. How much weight do you think the extra tank package adds (without fuel), and how does it function? Does it have a pump or does it simply drain into the main?
John
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  #8  
Old 12-14-2006, 12:04 PM
vic syracuse vic syracuse is offline
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John, I don't rmember the actual dry weight, so I'd rather not quote htat. SafeAir should have that on thier website. As for operation, there are 2 electrical fuel pumps (the same ones that are standard on all of the carberator Van's airplanes) in each wing to transfer the fuel into the main tank. I usually burn an hour out of each main, and then transfer the fuel. I put an led in the cockpit to remind me the transfer switch is on, and I set the countdonw timer on the transponder to remind me to turn it off. I have each pump wired separately with a left/right switch, so I don't run them together.

Vic
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  #9  
Old 12-24-2006, 12:01 AM
Ray J Ray J is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Hong Kong
Posts: 2
Cool RV-10 Aux Tanks

Well those Aussies have done it again!!
I know of at least one RV-10 in Australia which has the outer leading edge bays converted to fuel tanks (modified, mounted and configured same as standard tanks). I believe they left one bay spare to fit the transfer solenoid etc.
The owner had it done so as to give greater range as this A/C is used outback where it can be a long way between fuel bowser's. I believe this almost doubles the tankage capacity so be careful of MTOW limits.
They also fitted a turbo (normalised to 20,000ft) at the same time allowing the aircraft to make use of some pretty good tailwinds when available.
I belive a second aircraft is about to be converted.
One of the biggest advantages is that it is almost over the CofG is it not?
My future RV 10 will be built this way from day one!
Ray Jarvis.
RV-8 VH-RCJ.
520+ hours on the clock in 4 years! (one eyed aussie)
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  #10  
Old 12-28-2006, 07:26 PM
breister breister is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Atlanta, GA
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Glen,

There are two ways to solve a lack of fuel - adding tanks is only one of them.

Diesel engines use only about 65% of the volume of fuel consumed by gas engines for the same horsepower, effectively giving you 150% "fuel" capacity without increasing the fuel tanks.

There are two diesel engines out there that might be suitable for the RV-10 (based on horsepower). The SMA diesel is certified and makes around 230hp, but might be a bit heavy. The DeltaHawk actually looks like it will be in production soon, and has a 200hp version that weighs about the same as an IO-360. Designed to run at 100% power continuously and with a critical altitude of around 17,000', this motor should propel you at over 230mph TAS at 17,500' (using oxygen) while burning around 10-11gph. This would be my choice if I ever get the nerve/time to build my own RV. Using those figures, you should easily be able to fly 1200 miles with reserves...

Since you state that you WILL be building, I suggest that you have time to defer your engine decision until a bit closer to aircraft completion - the options may be greater by then.

Last edited by breister : 12-28-2006 at 07:30 PM.
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