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  #11  
Old 03-26-2005, 08:23 AM
Scorch Scorch is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 81
Default

If you decide to go with the Grand Rapids EIS, make sure it is well grounded as per the installation instructions. My display was jumping around erratically, drove me crazy until I called Grand Rapids and they told me this was almost always caused by a faulty ground. Found a loosely crimped ground connection, changed it out and the unit has worked perfectly ever since.
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  #12  
Old 03-26-2005, 09:30 AM
redbeardmark redbeardmark is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: EDVK
Posts: 323
Thumbs up GRT viewing ease

I think you'll find that the numbers are very easy to see and assimilate in a single glance. On one of teh custom pages available, I installed RPM, Oil Temp, Oil Pressure on the top line, and Fuel Pressure, Hottest EGT, Hottest CHT on the bottom line. This is also the default page. It is quite handy.

Also, like GMCJETPILOT said, having the same experience with which cylinder is hottest in different flight modes.

If you've got some cash burning a hole in your pocket, go for the pretty graphical stuff. I would have, but am incurably thrifty... except when it comes to burning avgas Most importantly, buy what makes you happy.

Mark Andrews N598X

Quote:
Originally Posted by tonyjohnson
George,

...
Do you find the digital display of the EIS easy to read at a glance? It seems confusing to me that only numbers appear, unless you opt to have only 3 readings per page, and descriptive letters below the numbers.

Thanks for your input,

Tony
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[color=SlateGray]Mark Andrews
RV8A N598X
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  #13  
Old 03-26-2005, 02:44 PM
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vlittle vlittle is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Victoria, Canada
Posts: 2,047
Default Rocky Mountain Micromonitor

I looked closely at both the RMI Micromonitor and the GRT EIS 4000.

I decided on the RMI box for a bunch of reasons:

- it fit into a standard avionics rack, and is easy to remove and upgrade (if necessary)
- it's display is easier to interpret than the GRT box... and in a stressful situation, that's a big benefit.
- it appears to be much easier to use.. only a couple of different display modes are used, not several.
- it's a fair bit lower cost, especially in kit form.
- it's a lot easier to wire up, especially if you want to make a removable panel.
- the RMI box looks better. That counts, doesn't it?

Yes it would be nice to have multichannel EGT/CHT automatically scanned, but my local A&P just laughed when I said that it would be nice... "on an O-320, it's overkill". If I was running a high compression engine with GAMI injectors lean of peak, then for sure.

Others will complain that the RMI box does not support fuel level sensors... this is true, but I really don't like 'god-boxes' that pack everything into them. If your engine monitor fails, then having external fuel gauges is a huge benefit. Have the engine monitor compute fuel flow, and use a seperate system for fuel level... totally redundant and fault-tolerant in my opinion.

Vern Little RV-9A
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  #14  
Old 03-26-2005, 08:15 PM
vlittle's Avatar
vlittle vlittle is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Victoria, Canada
Posts: 2,047
Default Rocky Mountain Micromonitor

I looked closely at both the RMI Micromonitor and the GRT EIS 4000.

I decided on the RMI box for a bunch of reasons:

- it fit into a standard avionics rack, and is easy to remove and upgrade (if necessary)
- it's display is easier to interpret than the GRT box... and in a stressful situation, that's a big benefit.
- it appears to be much easier to use.. only a couple of different display modes are used, not several.
- it's a fair bit lower cost, especially in kit form.
- it's a lot easier to wire up, especially if you want to make a removable panel.
- the RMI box looks better. That counts, doesn't it?

Yes it would be nice to have multichannel EGT/CHT automatically scanned, but my local A&P just laughed when I said that it would be nice... "on an O-320, it's overkill". If I was running a high compression engine with GAMI injectors lean of peak, then for sure.

Others will complain that the RMI box does not support fuel level sensors... this is true, but I really don't like 'god-boxes' that pack everything into them. If your engine monitor fails, then having external fuel gauges is a huge benefit. Have the engine monitor compute fuel flow, and use a seperate system for fuel level... totally redundant and fault-tolerant in my opinion.

Vern Little RV-9A
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  #15  
Old 03-27-2005, 03:36 AM
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Barry Barry is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 104
Default Rocky Mountain Engine Monitor

I have a Rocky Mountain Engine Monitor and have flown over 600 hours with it. I am very pleased with the unit and would install another one if I was crazy enough to build another airplane. It is installed in my RV6A which has a O360 A1A engine.

I agree with Vern's comments completely. For a carburetor engine a full display graphic engine monitor is rather overkill. I use mainly the fuel flow numbers when leaning out the engine in cruise also keeping an eye on the EGT.

Also I prefer to see digital numbers as it is easy to see trends such as for example the oil temperature rising in climb and going down in cruise.

I have a four position switch which allows me to look at each cylinder CHT and EGT one at a time. This is also useful if you have plug fouling on the run up so as to determine which plug is causing the problem.

Also after sales support from Ron at RMI is very good.

Barry
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  #16  
Old 03-27-2005, 09:21 AM
penguin penguin is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: England
Posts: 1,055
Default Monitor all CHTs & EGTs

FWIW, my view is that monioring all the CHTs and EGTs at the same time is almost essential. I have just fitted a new engine, the CHT spread was 80 F! With a little baffle work it is now down to 20F. If I did not have all the cylinders monitored (with an EIS 4000) I would not know what was going on.

I really like the EIS because of the BRL (Big Red Light), it flashes when any parameter exceeds the limit you have set. This means you can concentrate on flying while the box does the monitoring. My EIS cost $1150 last summer (with manifold press, carb temp, fuel press, but without fuel flow) other options can be added at any time. I have separate fuel gauges and would not hook them up to the EIS - I like to see how much gas I have. After a few hours you get to understand how the gauges lie to you.

I haven't used the RMI monitor so can't comment on it, I went with the EIS because the display is smaller, all 4 cylinder temps are displayed at once and it has the BRL. I wish it had a memory function.

Pete

Last edited by penguin : 03-27-2005 at 09:34 AM.
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  #17  
Old 02-20-2019, 01:35 PM
dshevick dshevick is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: san rafael,ca
Posts: 11
Default rocky mountain micro monitor has bad gph and map

my umonitor is showing optimistic fuel flow rates 30% low and my map is really low. i've tried to calibrate the map with engine off at the airport using the barometic pressure and still shows only 16" of pressure at full thottle (lycoming o-320). new senors or programming errors. also, any way to calibrate the other sensors. losing faith in this instrument thanks.
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