VansAirForceForums  
Home > VansAirForceForums

- POSTING RULES
- Donate yearly (please).
- Advertise in here!

- Today's Posts | Insert Pics


Go Back   VAF Forums > Model Specific > RV-14
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #21  
Old 12-09-2017, 11:22 AM
rmartingt's Avatar
rmartingt rmartingt is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Savannah, GA
Posts: 791
Default

I never use my air drill. A good lightweight cordless drill will be fine, and much quieter.

I just have a manual squeezer with a couple of yokes. It builds arm muscles
The bandsaw is a must; I have a Craftsman one that I picked up with some gift cards and have been impressed by it.

I have a 2X and 3X gun; we used the 3X for my dad's -6 many years ago and I can use it fine, but my wife finds the 2X more controllable on AD3 rivets. Make sure you have a swiveling flush set, but get a "fixed" one too as it will be valuable in certain situations.

I'm also using Dad's old C-frame because it was free.


I've gone to rattle-can primer because I always got terrible results with the Stewart Systems one and it was a pain to use as well. It's going to cost me a little more but I'm saving in aggravation.
__________________
RV-7ER - canoe flipped
There are two kinds of fool in the world. The first says "this is old, and therefore good"; the second says "this is new, and therefore better".
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 12-09-2017, 01:05 PM
Chris Cooper Chris Cooper is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Aberdeen, UK
Posts: 31
Default

The C-frame is really handy for riveting as well with the extension from Cleaveland. Great for the 470 rivets in the bulkheads and gives consistent results.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 12-09-2017, 01:26 PM
iamtheari iamtheari is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: ND
Posts: 156
Default

If you have the DRDT-2, it replaces the C-frame riveting tool that Cleaveland bundles in the kit, correct?

What about a pneumatic squeezer? If that fully replaces the hand squeezer, it doesnít seem like such an indulgence given that the latter is over half the price of the former. But if you need both, then it seems like it adds up quickly.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 12-09-2017, 01:31 PM
Nova RV Nova RV is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Leesburg, VA
Posts: 244
Default

The body of the pneumatic squeezer is quite bulky and there are a few places where it won't fit but the hand squeezer will, having both is a good thing. I think a good estimate is that you will spend 2X the tool kit cost by the time you are done buying tools.
__________________
Chris Moon

Leesburg, VA
RV-14A kit # 140243 (flying as of 11/18)
VAF 2017 and 2018 paid
www.mykitlog.com/chrismoon/
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 12-09-2017, 02:06 PM
DRMA DRMA is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Sugar Land, TX
Posts: 262
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by iamtheari View Post
If you have the DRDT-2, it replaces the C-frame riveting tool that Cleaveland bundles in the kit, correct?
Correct, you don't need both the DRDT and the C-frame. I have never wished I had the C-Frame and I have driven almost all the required rivets in the RV-10.
__________________
Dave Macdonald

RV-10 Finishing Kit & FWF in-progress
2018 VAF Dues Paid
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 12-09-2017, 02:10 PM
Kyle Boatright Kyle Boatright is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 3,372
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by iamtheari View Post
If you have the DRDT-2, it replaces the C-frame riveting tool that Cleaveland bundles in the kit, correct?

What about a pneumatic squeezer? If that fully replaces the hand squeezer, it doesn’t seem like such an indulgence given that the latter is over half the price of the former. But if you need both, then it seems like it adds up quickly.
The DRDT doesn't make dimples as "crisp" as the C-frame, but yes, if you have one, you don't need the other.

You can pick up hand squeezers for <$100 if you shop carefully. Above that cost, you're looking at incremental improvements, not game changers.
__________________
Kyle Boatright
Atlanta, GA
2001 RV-6 N46KB
2019(?) RV-10

Last edited by Kyle Boatright : 12-09-2017 at 02:43 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 12-10-2017, 10:04 AM
caapt caapt is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Pottsboro TX
Posts: 63
Default MY two cents worth

1. get the pneumatic squeezer. various yokes. I have 4, three lengths and C size
2. Right now Pan-American tools has a Xmas sale on their drill bit sets. I wish I had the #1-#60 set. There are many occasions where you need an oddball size bit. Often a one time use. This in addition to the common bits, 40,30,27,19.
3. get a Pneumatic clock puller. or find out how to treat tennis elbow
4. 1" grey abrasive wheel. I've gone through several. They are great for deburring rib flanges. The larger wheels have limited use.
5. My builders kit (from avery) included some cleckos that I never used. The gold color and the black color aren't used on the -14
6.There are a couple of applications for the 1/16 cleckos are used. they are not included in most kits.
7. angle drill-either the attachment or a seperate drill is a must
8. give some thought to how to organize the parts bags. I'm not sure my way is best. I put each bag in a parts bin. I have spent a lot of time reviewing inventory lists to find which bag a part is in.
__________________
14A Wing Complete!
Tail Complete
Fuse Complete
Engine installed
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 12-10-2017, 02:27 PM
rmartingt's Avatar
rmartingt rmartingt is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Savannah, GA
Posts: 791
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by caapt View Post
8. give some thought to how to organize the parts bags. I'm not sure my way is best. I put each bag in a parts bin. I have spent a lot of time reviewing inventory lists to find which bag a part is in.
I've found it easier, outside of a few specialized things like the rod-ends, just to dump all the standard hardware into sorted drawers by type and size. So I have a bin for AN3-3A, AN4-4A, and so on. But then, the -7 plans don't generally give you instruction by hardware bag, just the part numbers.

https://smile.amazon.com/Akro-Mils-1.../dp/B000LDH3JC
__________________
RV-7ER - canoe flipped
There are two kinds of fool in the world. The first says "this is old, and therefore good"; the second says "this is new, and therefore better".
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 12-11-2017, 03:21 PM
sf3543 sf3543 is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: San Antonio, TX
Posts: 921
Default All the previous comments are good advice

After numerous builds, my tool preferences have changed.
I built my first RV with basic tools and everything worked out fine.
However, preferences have changed as follows and I offer a few things to think about:

My Sioux drills are getting dusty since I almost always go to my cordless DeWalt 20V drills unless I need a smaller drill to fit in a particular space, which is very rare. (A 90* drill is handy but you don't really need one.)

I use the C-Frame for some riveting, but I now use the DRDT exclusively for dimpling. Easier and quieter and I haven't had a problem with results, but you can't rivet with it.

I prefer a 2X rivet gun because it is smaller and lighter than a 3X gun. A 3X gun would be preferable for a slow build kit since there will be a lot of 1/8" rivets, but for a QB, a 2X is plenty good. I recommend a small regulator on the handle of the gun for pressure adjustments.

For power tools, I use a band saw, disk/belt sander, grinder with a scotch bright wheel and a drill press. I have had both floor mount versions and bench top versions and I prefer the smaller bench top models. The only bench top tool I wore out was a band saw, which lasted for several builds before I decided to replace rather than repair. (HF sells cheap tool stands which work great for mounting these bench top tools, if you have the room.) I also have a vise mounted on a grinder stand and it works great for smaller stuff and can be moved around easily.

A small 20 gal compressor is all you need. Make sure to get the piston variety, instead of the diaphragm type, so the noise doesn't make you deaf. (Jay Pratt has built about 50 planes using a small 20 gal compressor!)

Fancy work benches are nice, but a piece of plywood on two saw horses is more than ample. You can take them down and lean them against the wall when you need space and you can have a couple different sizes of plywood for a smaller bench top when you don't need a larger one. Plus, you don't have to worry about drilling into it as you work and ruining the table top.

I have several work carts, from HF, to hold all my clecos, clamps, etc. so I can wheel them around to where I am working or be stored out of the way. The shelves on the cart are also a good place to store your drills and other hand tools. (you can also hang a lot of stuff on the wall if you have pegboard!)

You will need a lot of clecos, more 3/32" than 1/8" but the more the merrier. You may want a few of the larger sizes, but you can decide as you go along. I have at least 5 cleco pliers and a couple more would be nice to have. They also make a couple specialty cleco pliers that allow you to reverse them for tight spots, and one to get the cleco from straight up. I use these occasionally but they are not a necessity. I also have a pneumatic cleco tool which gets occasional use like when doing wing and fuselage skins, which require a lot of clecos.

I like to use several of the plastic drawer type storage bin thingies. I typically sort all of the bags of hardware in them right away and then just get the part I need as I go along. (I sort by type, not by bag.) Much easier than hunting through all the little bags as you go. That also allows you to add any bolt, rivet, etc. stock that you have in an organized way. I have these mounted on the pegboard wall to save table space.

Pneumatic squeezers are wonderful! If I had only one I would have one with the longeron yoke and a 3" no hole yoke at a minimum. I use these the most, however a hand squeezer would see you through the entire build.

There will probably be lots of other small tools and attachments that you will acquire over the build, but you'd be surprised at what you can do with just the basics.
Have fun!
__________________
Steve Formhals
RV6, RV8 (2), RV12 & RV3 99% done.
A&P, Tech Counselor & Flight Advisor

Last edited by sf3543 : 12-11-2017 at 07:27 PM. Reason: Grammer
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 12-11-2017, 05:25 PM
iamtheari iamtheari is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: ND
Posts: 156
Default

Wow, that is a lot of kit planes. Are you doing the 3 just as a challenge at this point?

Iím planning to slow build. Does that change the above advice, especially about drills and rivet guns? I would be happy to use my Dewalt 20V drill instead of buying a $250 air drill but only if it doesnt mean hating my drill, airplane, or both. Same goes with driving all rivets with a 2X gun vs a 3X.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:13 AM.


The VAFForums come to you courtesy Delta Romeo, LLC. By viewing and participating in them you agree to build your plane using standardized methods and practices and to fly it safely and in accordance with the laws governing the country you are located in.