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  #1  
Old 01-30-2010, 05:15 PM
greight greight is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: a
Posts: 32
Default RV-9 engine selection

Been looking at engine choices for the RV9---What is the lightest 150HP engine? It seems that the IO/O-320 weighs practically as much as an IO/O-360. I guess it is because all of the ancillary parts and accessories are the same. I think most even use the same case. And the costs are about the same.
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  #2  
Old 01-30-2010, 08:17 PM
Daver Daver is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Albuquerque
Posts: 297
Default light weight engines

According to Tony Bingelis (Firewall Forward) book recommended by Van's,
the o-320 E & A series weigh 244 lbs dry (table page 33) which is the lightest
o-320 listed and happens to be rated at 150 HP.

Of course, with ONLY 150 hp, your -9 will not be capable of flight

Dave
-9A FWF kit (150 HP o-320E2A)
N514R
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  #3  
Old 01-30-2010, 08:45 PM
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AK4x4 AK4x4 is offline
 
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Location: PAWS (Wasilla, Alaska)
Posts: 129
Default Engine weight

Just a thought, if you are trying to be as light as possable, Get an O-290-D2
(233 Lbs dry weight) It is factory rated at 140hp@2800rpm. Install 9/1 compression pistons and electronic ignition and you should be over 150hp. Also ECI has several lighterish options for the O/IO-320 but I dont have specific weights. Russ
A&P/IA Alaska
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  #4  
Old 01-30-2010, 09:33 PM
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L.Adamson L.Adamson is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: KSLC
Posts: 4,021
Default

Contrary to some beliefs, these planes don't need to be light as possible. When you stick a small engine on...............that's exactly what you get.............smaller performance, and it shows bigtime !

Believe me.....

L.Adamson --- RV6A
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  #5  
Old 01-31-2010, 06:49 PM
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N941WR N941WR is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: SC
Posts: 10,678
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AK4x4 View Post
Just a thought, if you are trying to be as light as possable, Get an O-290-D2
(233 Lbs dry weight) It is factory rated at 140hp@2800rpm. Install 9/1 compression pistons and electronic ignition and you should be over 150hp. Also ECI has several lighterish options for the O/IO-320 but I dont have specific weights. Russ
A&P/IA Alaska
Sounds a lot like my 990 pound O-290-D2 powered RV-9. Only that engine weighs 264 pounds dry (No oil, but all the accessories). Check out this site for engine weights.

Only one problem with that engine, after the prop strike I had last June I could not locate parts to overhaul it. Worse yet, the best quote I had for doing an overhaul was more than the cost of a new O-320 from any of the reputable engine shops. Once my insurance company heard that, they wrote me a check large enough to buy an ECi kit of my choice. Thus the O-360 that I currently have in my basement, waiting to be installed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by L.Adamson View Post
Contrary to some beliefs, these planes don't need to be light as possible. When you stick a small engine on...............that's exactly what you get.............smaller performance, and it shows bigtime !

Believe me.....

L.Adamson --- RV6A
Don't believe him...

I was very happy with my 135 hp O-290-D2 and dual electronic ignitions. With the climb prop I had, it would cruise at 165 mph / 140 knots and the climb rate was outstanding (1800 FPM solo). All that on ~ 7 gph. Oh, and because of the light weight, I had a 760 pound useful load without inflating the GW beyond Van's recommendation.
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Bill R.
RV-9 (Yes, it's a dragon tail)
O-360 w/ dual P-mags
Build the plane you want, not the plane others want you to build!
SC86 - Easley, SC
www.repucci.com/bill/baf.html
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  #6  
Old 02-01-2010, 02:51 AM
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L.Adamson L.Adamson is offline
 
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Location: KSLC
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by N941WR View Post
Don't believe him...

I was very happy with my 135 hp O-290-D2 and dual electronic ignitions. With the climb prop I had, it would cruise at 165 mph / 140 knots and the climb rate was outstanding (1800 FPM solo). All that on ~ 7 gph. Oh, and because of the light weight, I had a 760 pound useful load without inflating the GW beyond Van's recommendation.
Don't tell anybody.......... but his new replacement engine for the damaged 0-290 is a 180HP 0360. That's 20 HP over Van's recommendation for the RV9.

I guess... subconsciously, he really wasn't that happy afterall..

L.Adamson ---- RV6A
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  #7  
Old 02-01-2010, 04:33 AM
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N941WR N941WR is offline
 
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Location: SC
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by L.Adamson View Post
Don't tell anybody.......... but his new replacement engine for the damaged 0-290 is a 180HP 0360. That's 20 HP over Van's recommendation for the RV9.

I guess... subconsciously, he really wasn't that happy afterall..

L.Adamson ---- RV6A
No, not at all. When you look at the weight (12 lbs) and cost (~$500) difference between the O-320 and the O-360, I had to wonder why not put the larger engine in the plane. Besides, I'll gain that 12 pound difference back by going with a lightweight composite FIXED PITCH prop.

Had I not trashed the O-290-D2, I would have continued to be very happy with it. But since parts are not available for that engine and I couldnít rebuild it, I had to come over to the HP dark side.
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Bill R.
RV-9 (Yes, it's a dragon tail)
O-360 w/ dual P-mags
Build the plane you want, not the plane others want you to build!
SC86 - Easley, SC
www.repucci.com/bill/baf.html
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  #8  
Old 02-01-2010, 08:48 AM
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ArVeeNiner ArVeeNiner is offline
 
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Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 1,017
Default Carb location for a trike

FYI:

If you go with a carburated engine, some, like the O-320 B2B, has the carb too far aft which can interfere with the nose wheel strut. That is easily fixed (new sump, intake tubes, and oil pickup) but something to think about. I didn't know that before I bought my used engine.

If you are building a taildragger, it makes no difference.
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Kelly Johnson
San Jose, CA
RV-9A

Pink slip issued: 5/7/12

First flight: 5/28/12, Memorial Day.

Phase I Complete: 8/18/12!

2017 donation: complete
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  #9  
Old 02-02-2010, 07:43 AM
R.P.Ping R.P.Ping is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Peoria, AZ
Posts: 231
Default 160 HP Hartzell CS

I have close to 500 hours on my 9. I have a 160 HP O-320 with a Hartzell constant speed prop. Weight and balance is right on and the plane performs wonderfully all the way to 17,500 ft. There is a huge difference between a 150HP and a 160HP and a HUGE difference in climb performance and comfort when cruising when using a CS prop. Also 1 gph less fuel consumption with a constant speed prop when in cruise. Donít worry about being light. If you can carry more because you have a little engine and composite prop you have no performance to carry the extra weight. My 2 cents.
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Roger Ping
KDVT Phoenix Deer Valley
RV-9, O-320, 160HP, C/S
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  #10  
Old 02-02-2010, 10:21 AM
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David-aviator David-aviator is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Chesterfield, Missouri
Posts: 4,264
Default

Go with a Barrett light weight IO360 and Catto prop and you'll never regret it.
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David Domeier
RV-7A...Sold #70374
The RV-8...#83261 flying as of 6/16/2014
RV-3 ....fan

I'm in, dues paid 2017 This place is worth it!
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