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  #11  
Old 08-25-2017, 06:15 PM
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snopercod snopercod is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Asheville, NC
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Default Smoke Gets In Your Eyes

Smoke Gets In Your Eyes by the Platters.
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  #12  
Old 08-25-2017, 09:51 PM
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jcaplins jcaplins is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Davis, CA, USA
Posts: 446
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjconstant View Post
Thanks Jeff! Yup, the photo with your wing looks a lot like what I was flying through, although in my case the "high clouds" closed in around me, because of where I was, it turned out to be another layer of smoke! That was exactly where I said "screw it" and turned around!

Would you be willing to email me that photo, in as much resolution as is available for me to have a reminder for posterity? It might even make its way into a magazine article with photo credit, if you're willing.

Sure thing. I sent you a PM.
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  #13  
Old 08-26-2017, 01:48 AM
xblueh2o xblueh2o is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: SF East Bay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BobTurner View Post
Interesting what a difference a 'few' miles can make. We came back to LVK on Monday afternoon from KGCD/John Day, in eastern OR, via Lakeview, Redding, down the central valley, and while it was smokey it was always VMC, visibilities over 5, we could see the ground 10 miles away as well as blue sky above, etc.
Interesting. I wondered how far east you would have to go to be smoke free-ish.
I looked at a route during planning that was something like PDX DSD LMT RBL SAC and then another EUB ONP OTH CEC FOT ENI STS CCR but decided against them for a few reasons.
1. The MEAs were no better or sometimes even higher.
2. We were going to be IFR but somewhat stuck to victor airways instead of GPS direct. The route down EUG RBG FJS OED SAC cleared all the TFRs and was pretty close to on track anyway considering a start in KPDX. Yes, we were vector equipped but I wasn't going to count on that at the lowest IFR altitudes out in the mountain west were radar coverage down low is not super.
3. Going far enough east to be somewhat smoke free would have added almost an hour to the flight. The flight was already 3.5 plus hours. No need to add unnecessary flight time (says the guy who is in the airplane for 10 hours every time he goes to work).
4. Going down the coast had the added joy of even fewer places to bail to in an emergency. I brought a jacket in my backpack in case we went down in the mountains but I didn't bring a swimsuit or life vest.

While the route chosen put us in the thick of the smoke with the fire TFRs burning on both side of the route, the plan was to be IFR anyway. The smoke was pretty thick in places. When we were in the Medford to Fort Jones area at 11,000 the ground was not visible and we were only about 4-5 thousand feet above it in places so visibilities were down to a mile or so. Most of the time you could start to see clear air above but it was obvious it was going to be several thousand more feet to get there.

To be clear, it was either get to go flying with Jeremy or sit in the office and try and stem the seemingly endless flow of paperwork required by the FAA. Thanks for allowing me an excuse to duck out of the office for a day. Let's see, flying-paperwork, flying-paperwork. It wasn't a hard choice.
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  #14  
Old 08-26-2017, 08:26 AM
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Plummit Plummit is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: SoCal
Posts: 511
Default The smoke was ugly!

We were able to make it back to SoCal VFR but we had to climb to 17.5 to be "on top" of the smoke layer. On the trip North we were able to comfortably fly at 12.5 with better viz.

Going home we flew direct to KCPU (Calaveres) where we stopped for fuel, then were able to pick up flight following back to KLGB at 11.5k. When we were handed off to Bakersfield Approach we heard the sigmet about the NorCal T-storm line over Clovis, 60 miles wide with tops to 45K! We left early, as soon as the sun started to come back out after the eclipse. Sure glad we missed that! We were in a clear area using our route of flight down central CA.

Along the way we were flying with an RV in trail (we never talked to him) that was going to SNA. Other than the 23 kt headwind we were fighting the last 150 miles we had an uneventful flight home.

Having the IR rating and being current made the flight less stressful than it might have been.

-Marc
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  #15  
Old 08-28-2017, 11:35 AM
redbaron redbaron is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Lucerne,Ca
Posts: 184
Thumbs up Driving south

We also had a great time at Independence. Still working on our RV-12 (80% done) Driving south to Medford had to take back roads to save 1hr+ 15 min. because the freeway was congested. and the smoke was bad near the ground. Thanks for your wright up
Rich RV12-838RP
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  #16  
Old 08-28-2017, 04:42 PM
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mmarmol mmarmol is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 38
Thumbs up WE heard you!

Jeremy!

I was heading north back to Seattle after the eclipse when I heard your entire exchange on the air-to-air frequency!

At the time I was thinking that you'd made an excellent decision as things did not look great in that direction. I am very glad to see that this turned into an even better experience for you!

Best of luck ith your instrument ticket. I know that it made me a much better pilot and I think you'll see it does the same for you!

Have a good one,
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  #17  
Old 08-31-2017, 09:05 PM
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jjconstant jjconstant is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Oakland CA
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I'm having a great time getting back into student mode with my instrument training. Today's lesson was a quick flash back because of all the smoke around Livermore...lot's of requests for pop up instrument clearances just to get back to the airport from lots of people. We were out doing exercises to develop my scan and were at 2500' around Antioch and my instructor told me to take the hood off. It was way more VFR on my panel than out the window! It was legal VFR but just barely. When we called in 4 miles out I couldn't see the runway, but at 3 miles it came out of the murk. Several airports went IFR and you could really smell the smoke. While it was really awful visibility at least it was really hot too! We based scheduling the next lesson on whenever it was forecast to go back below 100 degrees!

Having fun applying the "education and recreation"!
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