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  #21  
Old 03-27-2020, 07:25 AM
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daddyman daddyman is offline
 
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Location: Fredericksburg, Virginia
Posts: 267
Default Pick a rwy and go for it

Quote:
Originally Posted by GHARBEN View Post
I have several hundred hours in various tail wheel planes. I normally prefer wheel landings in cross winds. With that said, I have very little time in a low wing taildragger. Especially such a slick airframe. I started approachís at 80. With no flaps that is a disaster! To make matters worse, N12HR has flaps that donít stay totally up or totally down very well. Once I realized that the RV 4 was so slick needed drag to stay on the ground, my landings began to improve. It still shocks me how little drag the RV 4 has. My latest landings were at 70 with half flaps. Not bad. When it quits raining, I canít wait to build some time and polish the landings.
Thanks
G Harben
GHARBEN,
I wrote my Pilots Operating Handbook. In doing so, I actually tested my own max cross wind component.
It does not have to be tested during a landing. You can taxi around the airport (hopefully there is a tarmac). I could not taxi effectively at 18 kts. Others may do better than me, and I accept that.
When I gained confidence I actually x-wind landed at 18 and set that as my HARD stop.
Beyond that I go to another airport, and find an UBER/Lift home. Note to me: just because I can land does not mean I can safely taxi.
Hitting a runway light at 10 mph still can be a very expensive excursion.

If you are lucky and your plane came with a POH, study it. Adapt it for you.
If not, then download one from here.

Happy landings,
Daddyman
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  #22  
Old 03-27-2020, 09:40 AM
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n82rb n82rb is offline
 
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Location: fort myers fl
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BobTurner View Post
The requirements for a standard category airplane are not just in the FARs; there are a lot of additional requirements hidden in the type certificate process. e.g., until the recent faa exemption for certain efis units, you had to install a TSOíd AI in a type certificated airplane. Thatís not in the farís, itís in the type certificate rules. Likewise, you will not find any normally certificated aircraft with a Type Certificate for ifr that has only one power source for attitude info.
show me the source of your info. FAR91.205 dictates what equipment is required for IFR flight. looking at type certificate 3A12 which is the type certificate for the cessna 172. since there are a lot of models,and getting into the newer models requires digging into the cessna manual, I will use the 172 - 172Q models. you will find this in the data pertinent to all models sections:

The basic required equipment as prescribed in the applicable airworthiness requirements (see
Certification Basis) must be installed in the aircraft for certification. This equipment must include
a current Airplane Flight Manual effective S/N 17271035 and on.

now going to car 3 which is the certification that the aircraft was certified under you will find under section 3.665 basic equipment, which is mostly the same things you will find in far 91. in in section 3.668 you will find the requirements for Gyroscopic indicators (air-driventype) the only mention of two sources is for multi engine aircraft.

the only redundant source is that cessna used a electric turn and bank, or T/C in their aircraft for certification.

there is nothing in the FARs that says a TSO'ed anything must be installed in a part 91 aircraft. there are systems that must "meet" the requirements of the TSO. A TSO does not permit the installation of anything in a type certificated aircraft, it is only one way of showing that a part can be installed on an aircraft.

there are thousands of pipers,cessnas,and beeches flying around with two air driven gyros and a electric T/C and even then, under car 3 there was nothing that said that the T/C or turn and bank needed to be electric.

again, if you can show me a certification document, or regulation requiring two independent source of power for IFR I would love to see it.
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  #23  
Old 03-27-2020, 09:46 AM
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n82rb n82rb is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: fort myers fl
Posts: 863
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BobTurner View Post
The requirements for a standard category airplane are not just in the FARs; there are a lot of additional requirements hidden in the type certificate process. e.g., until the recent faa exemption for certain efis units, you had to install a TSOíd AI in a type certificated airplane. Thatís not in the farís, itís in the type certificate rules. Likewise, you will not find any normally certificated aircraft with a Type Certificate for ifr that has only one power source for attitude info.
show me the source of your info. FAR91.205 dictates what equipment is required for IFR flight. looking at type certificate 3A12 which is the type certificate for the cessna 172. since there are a lot of models,and getting into the newer models requires digging into the cessna manual, I will use the 172 - 172Q models. you will find this in the data pertinent to all models sections:

The basic required equipment as prescribed in the applicable airworthiness requirements (see
Certification Basis) must be installed in the aircraft for certification. This equipment must include
a current Airplane Flight Manual effective S/N 17271035 and on.

now going to car 3 which is the certification that the aircraft was certified under you will find under section 3.665 basic equipment, which is mostly the same things you will find in far 91. in in section 3.668 you will find the requirements for Gyroscopic indicators (air-driventype) the only mention of two sources is for multi engine aircraft.

the only redundant source is that cessna used a electric turn and bank, or T/C in their aircraft for certification.

there is nothing in the FARs that says a TSO'ed anything must be installed in a part 91 aircraft. there are systems that must "meet" the requirements of the TSO. A TSO does not permit the installation of anything in a type certificated aircraft, it is only one way of showing that a part can be installed on an aircraft.

there are thousands of pipers,cessnas,and beeches flying around with two air driven gyros and a electric T/C and even then, under car 3 there was nothing that said that the T/C or turn and bank needed to be electric.

again, if you can show me a certification document, or regulation requiring two independent source of power for IFR I would love to see it.
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  #24  
Old 03-27-2020, 01:43 PM
BobTurner BobTurner is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Livermore, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by n82rb View Post
show me the source of your info.
it.
14 CFR 23.1331 which, of course, does not apply to EAB.
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  #25  
Old 03-27-2020, 03:16 PM
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n82rb n82rb is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BobTurner View Post
14 CFR 23.1331 which, of course, does not apply to EAB.
which also does not apply to any aircraft that was certified under CAR 3 which is a good chunk of the single engine standard fleet.
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