VansAirForceForums  
Home > VansAirForceForums

- POSTING RULES
- Donate yearly (please).
- Advertise in here!

- Today's Posts | Insert Pics

  #11  
Old 03-24-2012, 12:11 PM
David Paule David Paule is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 3,257
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bruceh View Post


....Do I need to put any washers in there to fill the gap between the clevis and the anchoring point? I snugged up the nut on the AN4 bolt to where the threads run out.
Yes, you should put washers or a spacer in there.

And since you've squeezed the clevis, it's worth checking it with a ten power magnifying glass to ensure that you haven't cracked it - check it while it's still installed so that if there are any cracks, they won't close when the fastener is removed.

Then look up the table in AC 43-13 to make sure that the squeeze hasn't affected the swage near the clevis.

If there aren't any cracks and the swage isn't affected - and I'd expect this to be the likely outcome - you're good to move on.

Dave
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 03-24-2012, 04:22 PM
bruceh's Avatar
bruceh bruceh is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Ramona, CA
Posts: 1,968
Default

Dave,

The clevis is not pinched or bent at all. The washer & nut bottoms out on the AN4-7A bolt.
I'm guessing the cable and clevis is meant to be loose enough to swivel.
Looks like at most I could get 1 more washer in there, but then it might be too tight to swivel. The plans are pretty vague on this, so I appreciate the feedback.

Here is a photo of the clevis and bolt.
__________________
Bruce Hill
RV-9A N5771H flown over 500 hours!
http://www.overthehills.com/RV-9A-Project
APRS Tracking for KJ6YRP and New Flying Blog
2017 VAF donator
EAA Tech Counselor

Last edited by bruceh : 03-24-2012 at 11:04 PM. Reason: Added a photo
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 03-25-2012, 11:43 AM
MauiLvrs's Avatar
MauiLvrs MauiLvrs is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: KTCY
Posts: 642
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Subwaybob View Post
Terry, are you serious? Would it make that much of a difference?
I believe that he is and that it does (because air is compressible)... sort of (because it likely makes the lengths the same - see below) ... when the differential pressure is significant like when in a slip.

Quote:
Originally Posted by airguy View Post
And it should be noted that physical geography has nothing whatsoever to do with the balance point of the pressure - i.e. it does not matter WHERE physically the tee is located (right, left, top, bottom, etc) in the fuselage - what matters is that the plumbing lines are of equal distance on both sides of the tee, to their respective static ports.

You can mount the tee right next to one static port, as long as you loop enough line so that both plumbing runs are of equal length, you'll still have the average of the two ports present on the tee fitting.
With the installation done with the tee at the top the ability for water to get to the instrumentation is decreased.


Quote:
Originally Posted by bruceh View Post
The plans are pretty vague on this, so I appreciate the feedback.
Thought that the drawing was rather clear, but I'll double check...
Bolt, clevis, washer, self-locking nut.

Drawing says :
AN7-7A Bolt
AN960-416 Washer
AN365-428 Nut

What wasn't consistent was why a self locking nut is used on one end and a castle on the other ... but probably because the seatbelt end get significant movement and twisting and the attach end is rather stationary.
__________________
Dave & Trina
RV-9A Flying - 330 Hrs. Painted Finishing the interior.

Last edited by MauiLvrs : 03-26-2012 at 02:21 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 03-26-2012, 01:34 PM
dlloyd3 dlloyd3 is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Locust, NC
Posts: 341
Default Panel

Bruce, Friday I was replying to your panel info when lightning struck. Fried the ethernet port on my router and computer. Got a TV also. Clear blue today so maybe.... Going with 1 com radio, you must intend VFR only so what you have is good. A warning light for the EMS is already handled by the Skyview popup and audio warnings. They can be for high or low temps, pressures, volts, etc. You could create something to show your boost pump running with a little thought. The Skyview will also remember flight time, tach time, and hobbs time whether you display them or not (don't buy a hobbs). Rather than backup steam gauges spend the extra money on a second ADAHRS. If you are really considering a second Skyview, don't put it way over there in front of your passenger. That's where mine is and my wife never looks at it. It will be out of your scan, not unusable, just never looked at. The only thing mine is used for is one knob is always set for the heading track, the other barometric pressure. To get the Skyview audio warnings you will need to wire to an audio panel or intercom--something that has auxillary inputs. Send you a pm with picture.
__________________
Dave
RV-7 Tipup, Flying, I0-360,
Hartzell, Dual Skyview

Last edited by dlloyd3 : 03-26-2012 at 01:48 PM. Reason: another thought
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 03-26-2012, 02:25 PM
MauiLvrs's Avatar
MauiLvrs MauiLvrs is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: KTCY
Posts: 642
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dlloyd3 View Post
If you are really considering a second Skyview, don't put it way over there in front of your passenger.
Unless someone is going to fly from there...
We use it all the time over there...

We installed a backup 2" compass and airspeed.
Everything else is backed up with the 696.

We installed a light for"
EMS warning
Oil Pressure
Alt
Starter engaged
__________________
Dave & Trina
RV-9A Flying - 330 Hrs. Painted Finishing the interior.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 04-17-2012, 04:14 PM
bruceh's Avatar
bruceh bruceh is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Ramona, CA
Posts: 1,968
Default Continuing with canopy work


I finally got the canopy frame back on the fuselage after doing the majority of my wiring. With the frame on the fuselage, I could set the distance between the mounting points of the struts that hold up the canopy. These parts have been collecting dust for the last six months. I measured and marked the minimum distance of 9 11/16", then added a sixteenth for good measure. Marked the top rails, set the vertical gap enough for the strut end caps to rotate without binding (used a 1/8" spacer), and drilled the holes using the predrilled spacers as a drill guide. The flush mounted screws normally require nuts and washers to hold them in place, but trying to get a wrench in under the top rails is next to impossible. Instead I fabricated up some backing plates with nutplates. This easily slides up under the top rail and really holds the strut mounts securely in place.


Strut in place on the canopy frame and top rail mount point. Without the canopy bubble weight on the frame, it is a bit over sprung.


The lower latch lugs are hard to hold in place and match drill. The trick here is to adjust the latch fingers with the control ends on the main latch rod until the fingers are in the best position relative to capturing the little roller on the lugs. Put the lugs up in place against the fingers and the canopy frame, then I used a #40 drill bit by hand to make a tiny mark on the upper hole in the lug. Took the latch lug off, centered and punched the mark and drilled it to #40. This allows you to hold the lug in place while it is up against the canopy roll bar. You can swing the lug a little bit left and right to get it centered on the latch fingers, then make another mark, and drill that one. Everything on mine lined up perfectly centered. Eventually these #40 holes will be drilled out larger for bolts. This leaves some room for fine tuning, but for now these latch nicely where they are.


I cut out some guide blocks for the tip up canopy. This is UHMW plastic, 1"X4", 3/4" thick, with the corner cut down. These will be fastened to the roll bar and will guide the lower latch lugs down to the opening in the canopy rails. It should prevent the corners of the bubble from contacting the rear skin of the fuselage where they tuck in place.
I cut this material with the table saw, then used sand paper of progressively smaller grit to get this all smoothed out.


The guide block installed on the roll bar. I had to open up the slot for the lower latch lugs just a bit. It is a very tight fit, but with the guide blocks in place the canopy comes down nicely and into closed position smoothly.


I went ahead and drilled and countersunk the top canopy latch block. You can see how the lower part of the latch handle has to be pulled down against the spring tension in order to turn to latch under the roll bar.
__________________
Bruce Hill
RV-9A N5771H flown over 500 hours!
http://www.overthehills.com/RV-9A-Project
APRS Tracking for KJ6YRP and New Flying Blog
2017 VAF donator
EAA Tech Counselor
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 04-18-2012, 02:56 PM
rv9av8tr's Avatar
rv9av8tr rv9av8tr is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 818
Default Top handle spacer

You'll need to put a spacer between the canopy top handle and the nylon block so that the handle can rotate without hitting the frame it's attached to. You're always pushing up on the handle to open the canopy then rotating it to hold it cracked open against the roll over bar, so it needs to freely rotate and clear.

With the tipup, you'll be limited on large display locations unless you work out changing locations of the panel mounting ribs.
__________________
Long-EZ built 1985 -> Sold 2007
RV-9A; N539RV First Flight: 7/2010
RV-8A N468DL 40 hr Flight Test Program
Building Log: www.mykitlog.com/n539rv
APRS Tracking: aprs.fi/n539rv
2017 Paid
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 04-19-2012, 12:53 AM
bruceh's Avatar
bruceh bruceh is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Ramona, CA
Posts: 1,968
Default

Mike,

I'm not sure what you mean by adding a spacer. There seems to be plenty of friction in the block so that if I pull the spring down and turn, the spring force doesn't necessarily pull the handle back up. The whole idea of adding the spring and setting the latch up against the canopy frame is to prevent the latch from accidently rotating and locking you out of the cabin.

I put a strip of UHMW plastic where the upper latch sits under the roll bar.



The forward panel ribs have been relocated (but not yet riveted) towards the center of the panel. I moved them in each by 5" and have a nice 8" wide center space on the panel.
__________________
Bruce Hill
RV-9A N5771H flown over 500 hours!
http://www.overthehills.com/RV-9A-Project
APRS Tracking for KJ6YRP and New Flying Blog
2017 VAF donator
EAA Tech Counselor
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 06-09-2012, 11:55 PM
bruceh's Avatar
bruceh bruceh is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Ramona, CA
Posts: 1,968
Default Wings On!

Big day and some Major Visible Progress (MVP). With some expert help from Roee Kalinsky (RV-7A builder), and some assistance from my kids the wings are on the fuselage.


Me like what we accomplished.


It is nice to have a 3 car garage as an airplane factory. The RV-9A, with its longer wings, just barely fits inside.

More photos and write up on my web site.
__________________
Bruce Hill
RV-9A N5771H flown over 500 hours!
http://www.overthehills.com/RV-9A-Project
APRS Tracking for KJ6YRP and New Flying Blog
2017 VAF donator
EAA Tech Counselor
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 06-10-2012, 01:24 AM
ArVeeNiner's Avatar
ArVeeNiner ArVeeNiner is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 1,051
Default

I remember that day. Very exciting. Congrats!
__________________
Kelly Johnson
San Jose, CA
RV-9A

Pink slip issued: 5/7/12

First flight: 5/28/12, Memorial Day.

Phase I Complete: 8/18/12!

2017 donation: complete
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:03 AM.


The VAFForums come to you courtesy Delta Romeo, LLC. By viewing and participating in them you agree to build your plane using standardized methods and practices and to fly it safely and in accordance with the laws governing the country you are located in.