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  #1  
Old 04-04-2018, 02:27 PM
jeffwhip jeffwhip is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Phoenix
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Default Torque Screwdriver Recommendation

I am looking to purchase an adjustable torque screwdriver for installing the numerous screws I have to put in. I was wondering if anyone had any recommendations?
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  #2  
Old 04-04-2018, 02:40 PM
Dean Pichon Dean Pichon is offline
 
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I recently purchased this one and have had good luck, so far:

https://www.amazon.com/Wheeler-Firea.../dp/B0012AXR4S

It's only good to 65 inch-lbs, so you can't use it for large hardware, but it is very popular among those that work on guns.

Good luck,
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  #3  
Old 04-04-2018, 03:47 PM
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rmartingt rmartingt is offline
 
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I second the recommendation. I have one and it's great for torquing AN3 bolts and their nuts.

It's also good for torquing the screws on outlets and circuit breakers in residential construction, which is what I originally bought it for.
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  #4  
Old 04-04-2018, 10:18 PM
jeffwhip jeffwhip is offline
 
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Do you also have another recommendation for a heavier duty one that will torque those things that will require more torque?
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  #5  
Old 04-04-2018, 10:54 PM
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JonJay JonJay is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dean Pichon View Post
I recently purchased this one and have had good luck, so far:

https://www.amazon.com/Wheeler-Firea.../dp/B0012AXR4S

It's only good to 65 inch-lbs, so you can't use it for large hardware, but it is very popular among those that work on guns.

Good luck,
Accuracy of plus or minus 2 inch pounds, or less. Thatís a 4 inch pound spread. . Good enough? Probably.
You can buy a relatively cheap 1/4Ē beam style that is 4% accurate (less than 1 inch pound spread on an AN-3.)

You get what you pay for. Snap-on specs out their screw drive digital at 4%, about the same as a cheap 1/4Ē beam style.

I am not a big fan of torquing small fasteners like screws unless they are in critical applications, which are very few in our RVís. Way too many mistakes made not accounting for, not knowing, or inconsistent nut or nut plate drag.

So, be careful in trusting any of these tools if you donít already have the mechanical inclination to know when it just doesnít feel right.

Two cents, flame on.....
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  #6  
Old 04-05-2018, 08:36 AM
David Paule David Paule is offline
 
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Location: Boulder, CO
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The only way I know to measure the locking or free running torque is to use a beam torque wrench. You've got to add that to the installation torque anyway. And then you might as well just use that and torque the fastener, since you've already done everything else and the wrench is right there in your hand.

I've found variation in the free-running torque, fastener to fastener, and it changes over time. So you can't assume it's just a single number and use that for everything.

Dave
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  #7  
Old 04-05-2018, 10:14 AM
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mike newall mike newall is offline
 
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Get an ordinary $80 Snap-On ratchet screwdriver, use their bits or good quality ribbed bits, tighten until the first nip, then just another 20-30į and the job is done. You are usually driving into a nutplate and they vary somewhat. If you are using a stiffnut on the back, you will have a socket or wrench on it - same technique.

Many tasks like this just need a bit of practise to develop muscle memory. It's a bit like counting rivet blows between 3/32 and 1/8th Or countersinking for nutplates etc with a speed deburrer - you just get the knack after a bit of practise.

It's not gash, it is what so many Engineers have been doing for years and years. Used to be taught to apprentices, but where do you find them these days - eh ?

The other thing you can do for floors and the like is to use a good brand electric screwdriver with a torque clutch facility. Ryobi do a couple in their One System. Once set, the clutch gives at the same place every time, saves a whole bunch of time and you get super consistent screw downs.
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