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  #11  
Old 04-01-2018, 04:26 PM
Jpm757 Jpm757 is offline
 
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Not familliar with the -10, are there any rudder return springs installed?
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RV6 completed 1991 sold.
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1941 J3 Cub
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Last edited by Jpm757 : 04-01-2018 at 04:29 PM.
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  #12  
Old 04-01-2018, 04:40 PM
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Auburntsts Auburntsts is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chippster1 View Post
Will check breakout force next
I believe 28lbs at the axle nut correct?
Close-- it's 26 lbs
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  #13  
Old 04-01-2018, 04:50 PM
BobTurner BobTurner is offline
 
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Location: Livermore, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jpm757 View Post
Not familliar with the -10, are there any rudder return springs installed?
No return springs.

The builder's manual shows where to apply the force/measurement. My recollection is that it was at one of the lightening holes (which is convenient for attaching a spring gauge), but I could easily be wrong about that. EDIT: SEE COMMENTS BELOW. USE AXLE

Last edited by BobTurner : 04-01-2018 at 11:20 PM.
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  #14  
Old 04-01-2018, 05:09 PM
Chippster1 Chippster1 is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Marietta, Ga
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I would love to see the video of the nose gear castering in flight
Does anyone know where it is?
Also, does anyone know why it would move one way or another?
Could it be a spiral in prop wash? I would think it would just want to weathervane in the relative wind, thus straightening itself out. I must confess I am perplexed
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  #15  
Old 04-01-2018, 05:36 PM
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RV8JD RV8JD is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chippster1 View Post
I would love to see the video of the nose gear castering in flight
Does anyone know where it is?
Also, does anyone know why it would move one way or another?
Could it be a spiral in prop wash? I would think it would just want to weathervane in the relative wind, thus straightening itself out. I must confess I am perplexed
Here, let me Google that for you:

"Before we tightened it, we shot a video and I was amazed to see just how much the nose wheel will turn due to prop wash!!"

http://n42bu.com/post/2013/09/24/Nose-wheel-shimmy.aspx
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  #16  
Old 04-01-2018, 05:38 PM
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9GT 9GT is offline
 
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If the nose wheel is not aligned straight when it lifts off the ground, it may be skewed left or right and not center, creating a trim effect. Breakout force is important. I would disassemble, clean and lubricate, and reassemble using the axle hole as the breakout force point of measure, not a lightening hole. Doing a lightening as the point of measure will cause an erroneous calibration.
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  #17  
Old 04-01-2018, 06:32 PM
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az_gila az_gila is offline
 
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Location: 57AZ - NW Tucson area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BobTurner View Post
No return springs.

The builder's manual shows where to apply the force/measurement. My recollection is that it was at one of the lightening holes (which is convenient for attaching a spring gauge), but I could easily be wrong about that.
Definitely 26 lbs at the axle - sheet 46-06
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  #18  
Old 04-01-2018, 07:45 PM
Jpm757 Jpm757 is offline
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Sherman, CT
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Get a chase plane and have a look see.
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Jake
RV6 completed 1991 sold.
RV7 #72018 N767T first flight 11/21/2017 150+ hrs.
IO-360M1B MT 3 blade, Dual AFS 5600.
1941 J3 Cub
2018 dues paid.
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  #19  
Old 04-01-2018, 08:24 PM
rocketman1988 rocketman1988 is offline
 
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Location: Sunman, IN
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Get a GoPro camera an video a flight. There are a couple of guys that make mounts for the camera that screw into the wing tie down hole...
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  #20  
Old 04-01-2018, 09:04 PM
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Lenny Iszak Lenny Iszak is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Palm City, FL
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I had the same problem at around 70 hours. The belleville washers loosen up after a while.

Here's a picture of what it looked like on my plane:

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