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  #11  
Old 06-12-2018, 10:27 AM
Carl Froehlich's Avatar
Carl Froehlich Carl Froehlich is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Dogwood Airpark (VA42)
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Default Wing tips

One comment for those still building. Defer wingtip fit up until after you mount the wings and do all the rigging - and have a couple of other people check the rigging as well. Once you are really sure the rigging is correct, then fit the wingtips.

I know the plans tell you how to do this with the bell crank jig and such - but why not wait until you can fit the wings on the plane? Iíve seen a lot of RVs that had rigging problems and a few ended up redoing the wingtips. Fixing this is possible by cutting the trailing edge and doing glass work, but I offer it is easier just to do it right the first time.

Carl
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  #12  
Old 06-12-2018, 02:18 PM
BobTurner BobTurner is offline
 
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Location: Livermore, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sglynn View Post
Agreed, only fixed surfaces like flaps will change a heavy wing. Ailerons just accommodate. Lower the flap on the heavy wing slightly. Oh, fuel in balance will also cause one side to be heavy.
Absolutely disagree. My -10 had a heavy left wing. Sighting down the top surface of the wing, the forward part of the left aileron was about 1/16Ē high, compared to the right aileron. I lowered the left aileron, heavy wing went away.
Iíd talk to Vans before lowering a flap. I think, for structural reasons, you want it up against the aft spar.
Obbviously, fuel and passengers need to be in balance for fine-tuning.
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  #13  
Old 06-12-2018, 02:39 PM
lr172 lr172 is online now
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paddy View Post
The plans reference the stop against the spar as the definitive reflex position. If it were mine, I would use that reference and not worry too much about 1/8 of an inch of alignment with the fuse bottom. It is important to make sure the left and right are evenly matched, however. If they're not even it might be necessary to adjust the high side flap down a bit with the pushrod, so it matches the other one that's up against the spar. The actual flap angle can be measured with a digital level (or a smartphone) held along the flap rib closest to the fuselage. This is also a handy way to check for twist in the flap by checking the angle of each rib from one end of the flap to the other.
To add to this: On my QB wings, there was a bit of sheet trimming that was needed to allow the flap to come to a full rest against the spar. It might be worth checking that you are getting a firm resting position of the flap against the spar.

Larry
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  #14  
Old 06-12-2018, 02:42 PM
lr172 lr172 is online now
 
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Originally Posted by BobTurner View Post
Absolutely disagree. My -10 had a heavy left wing. Sighting down the top surface of the wing, the forward part of the left aileron was about 1/16” high, compared to the right aileron. I lowered the left aileron, heavy wing went away.
I’d talk to Vans before lowering a flap. I think, for structural reasons, you want it up against the aft spar.
Obbviously, fuel and passengers need to be in balance for fine-tuning.
+1

Changing the vertical position of the aileron hinge fixed the heavy wing in my 6A. If you search, you'll find this has been the case for many builders. As previously stated, there are several things that could create a heavy wing and one should be comprehensive in checking / verifying them all.

Larry
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  #15  
Old 06-12-2018, 05:26 PM
togaflyer togaflyer is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Cleveland Ga
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This is all great advise. Thank you! On a side note, the lower cowling slot forward of the nose wheel fairing. How much should be left open. I have about 4 inches. Is this about right. Would closing it up closer to the fairing improve speed or cooling.
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  #16  
Old 06-12-2018, 05:43 PM
BobTurner BobTurner is offline
 
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Originally Posted by togaflyer View Post
This is all great advise. Thank you! On a side note, the lower cowling slot forward of the nose wheel fairing. How much should be left open. I have about 4 inches. Is this about right. Would closing it up closer to the fairing improve speed or cooling.
I extended the slot forward, about another 4”; then installed a piece of sheet aluminum, with nut plates, with the original fiberglass cut out epoxied onto it, to fill the slot back to original. I remove this piece prior to removing the lower cowl, makes clearing the prop spinner much easier. I do not think you can remove the lower cowl with the prop on if you reduce the slot length.
I have no data on drag or cooling if you reduce the original cut out.

Last edited by BobTurner : 06-12-2018 at 05:46 PM.
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  #17  
Old 06-12-2018, 06:37 PM
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Paddy Paddy is online now
 
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Default Cowl Slot

There's a whole thread on extending the cowl slot a few pages back in the RV-10 forum. I'd link to it but I dunno how.
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  #18  
Old 06-19-2018, 01:55 PM
togaflyer togaflyer is offline
 
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So I started from the beginning and this is where I’m at. Flaps checked and are resting against the spar in the reflex position. No twist in the flaps or ailerons. I rechecked the bell cranks positions and realligned the ailerons to the flaps. Trailing edges of the flaps, ailerons, and wing tips are all aligned. I checked the aileron height. It appears my left aileron, on the outboard side, is about 1/16 above the top skin at the wing trailing edge spar. Question, would this cause the left aileron to deflect down in flight, causing a roll to the right. I have not flown the plane since this recheck. I have noticed that all previous flights the left aileron is always slightly deflected downward causing a right roll. Before I do anything to the left outboard aileron hinge bracket, I want to make sure I’m going in the right direction.
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  #19  
Old 06-19-2018, 02:36 PM
BobTurner BobTurner is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by togaflyer View Post
So I started from the beginning and this is where Iím at. Flaps checked and are resting against the spar in the reflex position. No twist in the flaps or ailerons. I rechecked the bell cranks positions and realligned the ailerons to the flaps. Trailing edges of the flaps, ailerons, and wing tips are all aligned. I checked the aileron height. It appears my left aileron, on the outboard side, is about 1/16 above the top skin at the wing trailing edge spar. Question, would this cause the left aileron to deflect down in flight, causing a roll to the right. I have not flown the plane since this recheck. I have noticed that all previous flights the left aileron is always slightly deflected downward causing a right roll. Before I do anything to the left outboard aileron hinge bracket, I want to make sure Iím going in the right direction.
You have exactly the same condition I had: outboard side of elevator 1/16Ē high, plane flies right wing heavy. I slotted that aileron bracket, put some liquid metal goo into the hole and re-drilled to move the aileron down. Plane now flies wings level.
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  #20  
Old 06-19-2018, 04:04 PM
BillL BillL is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Central IL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by togaflyer View Post
So I started from the beginning and this is where Iím at. Flaps checked and are resting against the spar in the reflex position. No twist in the flaps or ailerons. I rechecked the bell cranks positions and realligned the ailerons to the flaps. Trailing edges of the flaps, ailerons, and wing tips are all aligned. I checked the aileron height. It appears my left aileron, on the outboard side, is about 1/16 above the top skin at the wing trailing edge spar. Question, would this cause the left aileron to deflect down in flight, causing a roll to the right. I have not flown the plane since this recheck. I have noticed that all previous flights the left aileron is always slightly deflected downward causing a right roll. Before I do anything to the left outboard aileron hinge bracket, I want to make sure Iím going in the right direction.
Yes, that is the correct direction. I was misled about the position in flight. Remember this . . . the ailerons have lift, a heavy means it is not even, the deflection is to balance that. The hinge slot, alone, will balance the wing and the ailerons will be in the same position when cruise. This is not caused by push rod adjustments.

I made a drill guide to precisely locate the new holes relative to the pivot pin. The 10 hinges look just like the 7.

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