VansAirForceForums  
Home > VansAirForceForums

- POSTING RULES
- Donate yearly (please).
- Advertise in here!

- Today's Posts | Insert Pics

  #21  
Old 02-11-2019, 06:26 PM
DanH's Avatar
DanH DanH is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: 08A
Posts: 8,148
Default

Quote:
Many years ago I asked an Aeroshell rep this same question. He said that for the Texas climate the 100W+ was fine year-round and also the least expensive.
Lycoming also has an opinion. Texas and Alabama both have lots of mornings with crankcase temps below 60F.

__________________
Dan Horton
RV-8 SS
Barrett IO-390

Last edited by DanH : 02-11-2019 at 06:28 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 02-11-2019, 07:07 PM
Sam Buchanan's Avatar
Sam Buchanan Sam Buchanan is offline
been here awhile
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: North Alabama
Posts: 3,860
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by chrispratt View Post
Many years ago I asked an Aeroshell rep this same question. He said that for the Texas climate the 100W+ was fine year-round and also the least expensive.

Unless you do a lot of cross-country flying to the North during winter, I would think the advice would apply to your situation as well. 750 hours later, engine runs great (knock on wood), takes about 1 qt every 12-14 hours. (O-360 A1A).

My 2 cents.

Chris
Another datapoint that will do nothing to settle this discussion....

For the first 17 years and ~1200 hrs of my O-320 I used W100 year-round. I run a sump heater 24/7 in the winter months (uh oh.....did I just say that??) so the heavier oil was never an issue. A couple years ago I switched to Phillips XC20W-50 because it is now less expensive than W100. The reasons I formerly used W100 was cost and I had read the heavier oil didn't drain back into the sump as quickly but I don't know if that was factual. But oil usage hasn't changed with the Phillips so the RV-6 and I are both happy. I am usually able to get the -6 in the air weekly in the winter so the type of oil in the sump is probably a non-factor.
__________________
Sam Buchanan
1999 RV-6
1918 Fokker D.VII replica

Last edited by Sam Buchanan : 02-11-2019 at 08:25 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 02-11-2019, 07:33 PM
Larry DeCamp's Avatar
Larry DeCamp Larry DeCamp is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Clinton, Indiana
Posts: 732
Default Rocket Bob question ?

Bob, whats your issue with Camguard besides price ? I use it for perceived moisture resistance since I only fly once a week in winter. Also, I thought it supplied some wear resistance that straight Phillips 20-50 does not ?
__________________
Larry DeCamp
RV-3B flying w/ carb / Pmags / Catto 2b / Steam
RV-4 fastback w/ Superior XP360/AFP/G3X/CPI/Catto3b
Clinton, IN
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 02-11-2019, 08:12 PM
BillL BillL is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Central IL
Posts: 4,731
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bkervaski View Post
So that's concerning. At 50 hours should I go ahead and switch to w100 plus instead of the 100 straight mineral oil to avoid any build up that a later switch to w100 plus may dislodge?
Short answer is YES, as soon as the break-in is complete ( basically the temps have dropped) then change to a fully formulated oil. 50 hr is likely too long. Once the oil consumption has stabilized for sure, the advantage of the 100 is over. You want all the advantages of lower friction, better acid control and the additives to keep stuff in suspension and not continue sludge formation. W100 or multigrade. I have personally switched to multigrade.

. . .Use the straight mineral oil for two short oil changes to get the wear particles out and switch the fully formulated oil of your choice.
__________________
Bill

RV-7
1st Flight 1-27-18
Phase II 8-3-18
Repairman 11-15-18
Instrument Currency 12-17-18
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 02-11-2019, 08:22 PM
Walt's Avatar
Walt Walt is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Dallas/Ft Worth, TX
Posts: 4,981
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BillL View Post
. I have personally switched to multigrade.

. . .Use the straight mineral oil for two short oil changes to get the wear particles out and switch the fully formulated oil of your choice.
New 370 ready for first run tomorrow, plan is basically the same as above, 2 oil changes (5hrs then again at 20hrs) with Phillips 20W-50M then over to Phillips XC 20W-50.
Add some Camguard to the mix after 50-60 hrs.
__________________
Walt Aronow, Dallas, TX (52F) RV7A, IO360, C/S, 1500+hrs

EXP Aircraft Services LLC
Specializing in RV Condition Inspections, Maintenance, Avionics Upgrades
Dynamic Prop Balancing, Pitot-Static Altmeter/Transponder Certification
FAA Certified Repair Station, AP/IA/FCC GROL, EAA Technical Counselor
Authorized Garmin G3X Dealer/Installer
RV7A built 2004, 1700+ hrs
Website: ExpAircraft.com, Email: walt@expaircraft.com, Cell: 972-746-5154

Last edited by Walt : 02-11-2019 at 08:28 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 02-11-2019, 08:31 PM
rocketbob's Avatar
rocketbob rocketbob is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: 8I3
Posts: 3,154
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry DeCamp View Post
Bob, whats your issue with Camguard besides price ? I use it for perceived moisture resistance since I only fly once a week in winter. Also, I thought it supplied some wear resistance that straight Phillips 20-50 does not ?
Easy to answer.

Engines that I've worked on that have had a steady diet of XC are always clean inside.

Engines with a steady diet of Aeroshell and/or Camguard will have carboned ring lands, burnt oil deposits on the back sides of pistons, and everything inside is varnished.

I've seen pitted tappets and cams on engines with Camguard.

Blackstone will tell you there is no difference between brands: "we’re pretty confident in saying that, in general, it doesn’t matter what oil you use, as long as you’re following the manufacturer’s recommendations." That said, I've gotten samples to them from engines with known problems making plenty of shavings in the filter and they came back fine.

Bottom line is that one can use the least expensive oil, X/C, and with a bit of good behavior by doing things like: flying often, keep the engine cool, aggressively leaning, running LOP, changing oil on condition rather than on time or calendar, don't preheat too long, avoid starting cold, leave the dipstick open after flying or preheating...yada yada yada you can expect very few problems.
__________________
Bob Japundza CFI A&PIA
N55BC RV-6 borrowed, flying
N678X F1 Rocket, under const.
N244BJ RV-6 "victim of SNF tornado" 1200+ hrs, rebuilding
N8155F C150 flying
N7925P PA-24-250 Comanche, restoring
Not a thing I own is stock.

Last edited by rocketbob : 02-11-2019 at 08:33 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 02-11-2019, 09:01 PM
Plummit's Avatar
Plummit Plummit is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: SoCal
Posts: 742
Default

The only thing this thread is missing is a review of an engine running MMO! ;-)

-Marc
__________________
RV-10
N814RV
2018 Donation made!
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 02-11-2019, 09:33 PM
rocketbob's Avatar
rocketbob rocketbob is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: 8I3
Posts: 3,154
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Plummit View Post
The only thing this thread is missing is a review of an engine running MMO! ;-)

-Marc
I use it to remove the s*** Aeroshell leaves behind. Works great for that.
__________________
Bob Japundza CFI A&PIA
N55BC RV-6 borrowed, flying
N678X F1 Rocket, under const.
N244BJ RV-6 "victim of SNF tornado" 1200+ hrs, rebuilding
N8155F C150 flying
N7925P PA-24-250 Comanche, restoring
Not a thing I own is stock.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 02-12-2019, 07:23 AM
BCP Boys's Avatar
BCP Boys BCP Boys is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Kennesaw, Ga
Posts: 631
Default

This is one of those topics that is similar to politics or religion. You are never going to get the "right" answer because people express their experiences and their beliefs based on those experiences.

I've been following Mike Bush's recommendations for over 20 years as I use to be a twin Cessna owner for many years and Mike Bush is and was the man to listen to because he took his engines that were designed for 1500 hr TBO to close to 3000 hrs.
Someone suggested listening to him which is a good recommendation so that you can come up with your own conclusion. All i can tell you is that it is great education and like all other educational material, you have to decide how you will use your new found knowledge.
__________________
Amir
----------
RV-7 QB - N174WM
Supporting VAF since the first visit
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 02-12-2019, 08:10 AM
rocketbob's Avatar
rocketbob rocketbob is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: 8I3
Posts: 3,154
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BCP Boys View Post
This is one of those topics that is similar to politics or religion. You are never going to get the "right" answer because people express their experiences and their beliefs based on those experiences.
Disagree. I see what I see. Have had many in-depth conversations with one of the Phillips engineers when a close friend was testing oil for them.

Bottom line: X/C is less expensive and works as well according to the data presented in the newsletter here: https://gallery.mailchimp.com/f64139...g_17_AC.01.pdf

And it doesn't paint the inside of your engine brown.

The comments about copper in Aeroshell samples is and has been interesting.
__________________
Bob Japundza CFI A&PIA
N55BC RV-6 borrowed, flying
N678X F1 Rocket, under const.
N244BJ RV-6 "victim of SNF tornado" 1200+ hrs, rebuilding
N8155F C150 flying
N7925P PA-24-250 Comanche, restoring
Not a thing I own is stock.

Last edited by rocketbob : 02-12-2019 at 08:13 AM.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:56 PM.


The VAFForums come to you courtesy Delta Romeo, LLC. By viewing and participating in them you agree to build your plane using standardized methods and practices and to fly it safely and in accordance with the laws governing the country you are located in.