VansAirForceForums  
Home > VansAirForceForums

- POSTING RULES
- Donate yearly (please).
- Advertise in here!

- Today's Posts | Insert Pics

  #1  
Old 07-14-2017, 02:29 AM
rv8gibbo rv8gibbo is offline
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Maitland, Australia
Posts: 69
Default B&C Ground Block Grounding

Hi Guy's

I've decided to mount my B&C Ground Block behind my panel but I'm unsure if it would be OK to run the Ground to a separate bolt on the firewall rather then back to the block itself? Can anyone see a issue doing this?


Many Thanks
Gibbo


Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07-14-2017, 05:58 AM
BillL BillL is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Central IL
Posts: 3,939
Default

The block should have a good electrical connection (strap/wire) directly back to the battery.

Your plane is a little different geometry than my 7, but I mounted the block to the aft FW and used a brass through bolt to a ground strap directly to the battery post on the forward (engine) side. This covered the chassis and battery ground.
__________________
Bill

99% at the hangar now
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-14-2017, 10:02 AM
longline longline is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: silverdale, WA
Posts: 179
Default Grounding

is best done like Bill suggests, but common sense needs apply when you evaluate your particular situation. Battery forward? Then ground to the Battery. If Battery aft there is nothing wrong with using the airframe for ground return to avoid running another heavy wire.

The FOT can be directly grounded to the firewall. No matter where you ground the FOT you avoid ground loops by using it exclusively, when possible, for grounding, which keeps the potential between things under control.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07-15-2017, 04:41 PM
rv8gibbo rv8gibbo is offline
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Maitland, Australia
Posts: 69
Default

Thanks Bill & longline, I made the decision knowing that the favorable location is on the firewall with the ground wire directly to the battery (up Front) but I wasn't overly happy with the FOT behind the pedals and the next best spot was over the left side forward of the fuel pump on the firewall but in that location I would require the same if not a longer wire run as to where I have it located behind that panel. It won't be an issue running the ground from this location but I guess the question was whether or not grounding to the a firewall bolt away from the FOT would be a issue.

Cheers Gibbo
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07-15-2017, 06:44 PM
rv7charlie rv7charlie is offline
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Pocahontas MS
Posts: 2,216
Default

If you look in the book (you do have the book, right?) Bob details the primary FOT on the back of the firewall, as others describe (for all the higher current, noisy ground returns), and an avionics ground bus near the instrument panel. In that case, the avionics ground would have its ground wire run back to the firewall.

If you're grounding everything at the instrument panel, then 'float' the FOT & run a heavy ground wire(s) back to your firewall ground feedthrough. The whole idea is to keep your avionics grounds away from a situation where they are 'between' other items' ground connections and the battery negative.

BTW, if you're using high quality PIDG terminals, the shrink wrap is redundant. Looks pretty, though. :-)

Charlie
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 07-16-2017, 05:24 PM
rv8gibbo rv8gibbo is offline
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Maitland, Australia
Posts: 69
Default

Thanks Charlie
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:12 AM.


The VAFForums come to you courtesy Delta Romeo, LLC. By viewing and participating in them you agree to build your plane using standardized methods and practices and to fly it safely and in accordance with the laws governing the country you are located in.