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  #1  
Old 07-15-2017, 05:26 AM
chris mitchell chris mitchell is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: near Harrogate, England
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Default Changing sumps = Lycoming to Superior

I have a Lycoming IO-320 with the original Lycoming sump installed. I want to change it to the Superior cold air sump. AS far as I can see from internet searches, it should be a simple matter of unbolting the told one and installing the new one (new gasket and fastenings), and I will probably have to change the induction pipes and may have to trim and calibrate the oil dipstick. Is that it?

I'd be grateful for any info from anyone who has done this job.

Many thanks

Chris
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  #2  
Old 07-15-2017, 06:33 AM
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Bubblehead Bubblehead is offline
 
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I made this change on an IO-360. The sump came with new induction pipes. We had to make a few different brackets to get the mixture and throttle cables aligned the way we wanted them but other than that is was pretty easy.

I did not think about the oil dipstick. Have you read something that says it needs to be recalibrated? It still fits fine i.e does not bottom out.
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  #3  
Old 07-15-2017, 08:06 AM
mahlon_r mahlon_r is offline
 
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As long as your 320 sump has the oil suction screen in the rear of the sump it should be an easy bolt up situation. remove existing sump and pipes ,install the new sump and pipes and calibrate the dipstick. But if you have an IO-320 that was "made" from a 320 that has the oil suction screen on the bottom of the sump, in front of the fuel in injector, then it will require modification of the accessory housing, in addition to the above conversion steps. Of course that is from an engine standpoint only, airframe parts such as brackets, exhaust pipes, air filter ducting, etc. may need modification as well.
Good Luck,
Mahlon
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  #4  
Old 07-17-2017, 09:23 AM
chris mitchell chris mitchell is offline
 
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Location: near Harrogate, England
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Default Simple job!

Thanks for the information.

The oil pipe was at the back of the sump, so it was indeed a simple unbolt and reboot task. The only minor point was that the original, Lycoming, sump has 4 studs on it, so I needed 4 additional nuts and bolts.

About to fit the induction pipes and then the job is done.

Chris
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  #5  
Old 07-17-2017, 01:12 PM
pa38112 pa38112 is offline
 
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What are you changing for - are you looking for more power, or more even air distribution? Please report back the results.
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  #6  
Old 07-17-2017, 02:21 PM
chris mitchell chris mitchell is offline
 
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I'm hoping for more power (cold air = denser charge) and less weight. Plus I think the front induction looks better than vertical induction and there is the option of some ram air effect = a little bit more power.

The weight saving over the Lycoming sump is about 5 pounds IIRC. The Sky Dynamics one is even lighter but costs about 3 times as much.

I'm trying to minimise the all up weight of the aircraft. A few ounces here, a few ounces there, it all adds up pretty quickly to something worthwhile.

Change sump.
MT prop rather than Hartzell
Little battery
Minimal instruments and electronics

And not ignoring:
Diet and more exercise for the pilot.
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  #7  
Old 07-17-2017, 02:54 PM
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Raymo Raymo is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pa38112 View Post
What are you changing for - are you looking for more power, or more even air distribution? Please report back the results.
Clint at Vetterman Exhausts dyno'd the two setups and said (paraphrased) the gain comes from the higher MAP relating to intake pressure and volume of the Superior sump. His opinion was that the temperature of the air was not significant enough to provide benefit. He said they proved >5 HP on the same engine with just the sump change.
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  #8  
Old 07-21-2017, 07:07 AM
chris mitchell chris mitchell is offline
 
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Default Sump change - The practical details!

This job was easy though I approached it with a bit of trepidation - not a bad frame of mind to be in I suppose! Anyway, here, for those of you who are contemplating the same "upgrade", are the practical details.

Tools:
Wire cutter and needle nosed pliers - for removing safety wire;
1" open-ended wrench for oil fitting;
1/16" Allen key for grub screw on oil fitting;
1/2, 7/16 and 3/8 ring/open-ended spanners and sockets;
ratchet etc;
torque wrench;
thread locking stuff;
torque seal.

Parts:
New sump and gasket;
Selection of 1/4" and 5/16 UNC nuts, bolts plain and lock washers;
AN900-16, MS35769-21 copper gasket for oil pipe.

Suggested order of proceedings:

Tape up all orifices so you can't drop nuts, washers etc down them! I once saw the end of a screw driver embedded in the crown of a piston - after the customer had flown into our strip so hot aircraft could have a major overhaul.....

Remove your carburettor or fuel injection servo. The latter will be held in place with 4 x 5/16" nuts. I know nothing about carburettors!

The oil feed is on the rear of the Lycoming sump. Cut the lock wire and remove the grub screw from the oil feed pipe. Remove the oil feed fitting and little copper screen from the rear of the sump.

Undo all the nuts and bolts holding the sump in place. My sump had 4 x nuts on studs, 8 bolts into blind holes, and 8 nuts/bolts making 20 fastenings in all. The sump should come off easily. If it does't you probably missed one - look carefully before starting to pry at it!

My sump did not need studs (the Lycoming sump had 4, adjacent to the induction outlets). I would have replaced the 8 bolts in blind holes with studs but that wasn't the way it was put together - so I took that as my guide. I guess YMMV!

Clean up and inspect as required.

Bolt the new sump in place, with the new gasket. I did not tighten any bolts/nuts until I had them all in -there was a little bit of movement between sump and crank case. Once everything is in place gradually tighten the nuts, working front to back and side to side - don't just fully tighten and work round the case. Torque for 1/4" UNC bolts I have as 40-50 inch-pounds.

Refit the oil feed with a new copper gasket. I found it much easier to do this after I had taken the induction plenum off as the right rear induction pipe is a bit in the way. The little grub screw holds the feed pipe at an appropriate angle.

Refit the induction plenum - these bolts are 5/16 UNC, torque I have at 80-90 inch-pounds.

Refit the fuel injection servo. Here there are 5/16 UNC studs. Both Superior sumps I have fitted have had overly long studs fitted, that I have had to remove and shorten. I had to take the plenum to an engineering shop to get them removed, as none of my usual tricks worked (two nuts tightened together, a Snap-On stud remover, application of blow-lamp...). Also the servo was quite a loose fit on the studs so I made some little sleeves to provide better location.

Fit the new induction pipes - bolt to inlet at the cylinder end and clips/pipes at the plenum end.

In the UK, ask inspector nicely to come and check all, complete paperwork etc.

All done.

I hope that is helpful.

Chris
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Chris Mitchell

Repeat offender;
RV-8, QB, built, flown 150 hours, sold;
RV-4 - attempted repair, rebuild and remediation - abandoned and junked ;
RV-4 fuselage and wing kits - both at QB stage;
2015-2018 dues paid!

Last edited by chris mitchell : 07-21-2017 at 07:10 AM.
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  #9  
Old 07-24-2017, 09:55 PM
SJordan SJordan is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
Posts: 163
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Just a quick note.
Just pulled the crazy long servo studs out of two new Superior sumps. They will not come out unless you heat them up nice and hot. I used MAP gas torch and with dual nuts they will pop lose with enough heat. No discoloration was caused.
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  #10  
Old 07-25-2017, 05:36 AM
mahlon_r mahlon_r is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raymo View Post
Clint at Vetterman Exhausts dyno'd the two setups and said (paraphrased) the gain comes from the higher MAP relating to intake pressure and volume of the Superior sump. His opinion was that the temperature of the air was not significant enough to provide benefit. He said they proved >5 HP on the same engine with just the sump change.
Back in the day, we got a pretty consistent 7 hp increase over a stock vertical sump when using the superior, aero or Lycoming forward facing sump. when we first tried those sumps, we tested the same engines, with either sump on the same day, in the exact same conditions in the test cell, ie with same ambient's and same oil temps and chts and got 7 to 7.5 hp on all of the tests. Purpose of the test was to confirm a HP increase that we were comfortable to pass along to perspective customers. We always advertised a 7hp increase with the cold air sumps.
Good Luck,
Mahlon
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