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  #11  
Old 05-16-2018, 05:45 AM
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Auburntsts Auburntsts is offline
 
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Originally Posted by flyinhood View Post
I'm a big fan of using VS on initial autopilot engagement. It is easy to roll it down as your approaching your first assigned altitude, or you can just roll in a value that will give you your desired deck angle after ATC gives you your first climb and you have your engine power set for climb.


Great advice on checking everything before and during engagement. We all know that altitude and Nav deviation errors are the FAA's 2 biggest corrections.
I would prefer to use IAS for climbs and VS for descents, unfortunately my autopilot only does VS. The reason is for safety -- by using IAS I lesson the chance of the autopilot flying me into a stall trying to maintain a high VS.
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  #12  
Old 05-16-2018, 10:42 AM
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Noah Noah is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Auburntsts View Post
I would prefer to use IAS for climbs and VS for descents, unfortunately my autopilot only does VS. The reason is for safety -- by using IAS I lesson the chance of the autopilot flying me into a stall trying to maintain a high VS.
Very interesting idea! My Trutrak VGSV AP has a user programmable minimum speed (Don't most?) Maybe I should bump it up from 90 to 120 so that cooling in the climb is not compromised and I can set climb rate at something high like 1000 fpm - it will reach that down low and then transition from climb rate to being IAS limited at a few thousand feet altitude - I like this idea!
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  #13  
Old 05-16-2018, 10:54 AM
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Auburntsts Auburntsts is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Noah View Post
Very interesting idea! My Trutrak VGSV AP has a user programmable minimum speed (Don't most?) Maybe I should bump it up from 90 to 120 so that cooling in the climb is not compromised and I can set climb rate at something high like 1000 fpm - it will reach that down low and then transition from climb rate to being IAS limited at a few thousand feet altitude - I like this idea!
Actually mine does too -- I forgot all about that feature. Thanks for reminding me! I'd still like to be able to climb by setting an IAS, but it's at least not a safety issue I was thinking it was. The autopilot I got my IR on didn't have that safety feature so I defaulted to my learning primacy forgetting a fundamental feature of my system.
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  #14  
Old 05-16-2018, 11:03 AM
BobTurner BobTurner is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Noah View Post
Very interesting idea! My Trutrak VGSV AP has a user programmable minimum speed (Don't most?) Maybe I should bump it up from 90 to 120 so that cooling in the climb is not compromised and I can set climb rate at something high like 1000 fpm - it will reach that down low and then transition from climb rate to being IAS limited at a few thousand feet altitude - I like this idea!
If you set the minimum speed at 120 I think that will apply to descents, too. You’ll be unable to shoot an approach below 120 knots.
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  #15  
Old 05-16-2018, 11:06 AM
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larrynew larrynew is offline
 
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Originally Posted by flyinhood View Post
I'm a big fan of using VS on initial autopilot engagement.
Same here. Default AP engagement is VS at 500fpm. But, I transition (one simple button push on Dynon AP panel) to IAS for the climb to altitude. Aircraft is accelerating at a 500fpm climb (aren't RVs great) and I usually select IAS when at 120kts for the climb which works out perfectly when climbing to around 12K. I get to 120kts quickly but always above 1000 AGL.
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  #16  
Old 05-16-2018, 11:22 AM
BobTurner BobTurner is offline
 
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Originally Posted by larrynew View Post
Same here. Default AP engagement is VS at 500fpm. But, I transition (one simple button push on Dynon AP panel) to IAS for the climb to altitude. Aircraft is accelerating at a 500fpm climb (aren't RVs great) and I usually select IAS when at 120kts for the climb which works out perfectly when climbing to around 12K. I get to 120kts quickly but always above 1000 AGL.
Must be nice living in the flatlands. Here at LVK 500 ft/min and 120 knots will put you into the side of a hill on the standard IDP.
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  #17  
Old 05-16-2018, 12:39 PM
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Dugaru Dugaru is offline
 
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I have developed a habit of turning the autopilot on after takeoff using the CWS button, after pitching over to a more visibility- and cooling-friendly speed than Vy. The Garmin then turns on and starts off by matching the current roll and pitch of the aircraft. That has turned out to be a surprisingly handy way to do things. It minimizes the chance for surprises from having dialed in the wrong heading, not set up the correct nav source, etc.

I otherwise use VS to govern climbs and descents.

Quote:
Originally Posted by flyinhood View Post
I'm a big fan of using VS on initial autopilot engagement. It is easy to roll it down as your approaching your first assigned altitude, or you can just roll in a value that will give you your desired deck angle after ATC gives you your first climb and you have your engine power set for climb.


Great advice on checking everything before and during engagement. We all know that altitude and Nav deviation errors are the FAA's 2 biggest corrections.
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  #18  
Old 05-16-2018, 03:37 PM
flyinhood flyinhood is offline
 
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All good stuff. Mission and equipment dependent especially.

Min airspeed is a great saftey feature, but may lead to excessive deck angle and (for me) could be disorienting as you penitrate the first cloud layer right about the time your handed off to departure.

Pitch is nice for pax comfort.

VS is nice for controllability and rolling down a nice climb / cylinder temp management especially with in 1,000 feet of your assigned altitude.

My answer for how I fly is to use ALL of them depending on the circumstance (ie departure climb, pax comfort, cylinder temp, initail altitude assignment etc)
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  #19  
Old 05-17-2018, 01:26 PM
lr172 lr172 is offline
 
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Originally Posted by cajunwings View Post
To add: Practice and more practice is the only way to get or stay sharp. Any time you turn a autopilot on or off it may do something you don’t expect so be prepared and a little altitude might be a good thing. 1 example- on a night IFR departure at 1000’ I had a trim runaway triggered by autopilot engagement. For a reason manufacturers sometimes specify minimum altitudes for autopilot use. Be careful out there.

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+1

I have had a few unexpected things happen when turning on the autopilot. I could not imagine turning it on at 50' AGL. The risk reward equation seems negative to me. What happens if you accidentally set the altitude bug to a lower altitude?

Larry
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