VansAirForceForums  
Home > VansAirForceForums

- POSTING RULES
- Donate yearly (please).
- Advertise in here!

- Today's Posts | Insert Pics


Go Back   VAF Forums > Model Specific > RV-10
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-27-2018, 03:13 PM
Lynnb's Avatar
Lynnb Lynnb is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Cedar Hill, TX
Posts: 217
Default Cabin Top/Windows/Motor Does the Order Matter

I was just curious if the engine could be hung and worked on before the Cabin top was installed?

If the cabin top is installed, does the front windshield need to be installed before the engine is hung?

I'm still working on my cabin top, doing some fiberglass, planning some painting etc and was thinking I could start some of the baffling and cowling work in my down time while stuff is curing/drying.

Thanks,
Lynn
__________________
RV-10 in Process
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-27-2018, 04:15 PM
Kyle Boatright Kyle Boatright is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 3,285
Default

From an engineering perspective, there's nothing to stop you from doing what you propose. I would install the vertical hinges along the sides of the firewall before you hang the engine. That will firm up the front structure for the 400 lb+ engine.

Also, remember that once you put the airplane on its gear, you absolutely will need a ladder to work on the cabin top - at least the upper portion. That would be a show stopper for me. I don't need/want that inconvenience.

Sez the guy who just "finished" the cabin top, doors, and windows, and put the airplane on its gear a week ago today...
__________________
Kyle Boatright
Atlanta, GA
2001 RV-6 N46KB
2019(?) RV-10
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-27-2018, 04:19 PM
Carl Froehlich's Avatar
Carl Froehlich Carl Froehlich is online now
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Dogwood Airpark (VA42)
Posts: 1,609
Default

Donít underestimate the time needed for cabin top, doors and glass. Consider the downside of taking the nice pickled engine out of the crate for such an extended period.

The other consideration is all the glass dust you will generate from sanding. No need to trash the engine with that.

Carl
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-27-2018, 04:33 PM
rocketman1988 rocketman1988 is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Sunman, IN
Posts: 1,023
Default Yeah, what he said^^^^^

What he said!
__________________
Bob
Aerospace Engineer '88

RV-10
Structure - 90% Done
Cabin Top - Aaarrghhh...
Doors - Done
On Gear
290 HP Barrett Hung
ShowPlanes Cowl with Skybolts Fitted - Beautiful

Dues Paid 2017,...Thanks DR+
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-27-2018, 06:07 PM
Bill Boyd's Avatar
Bill Boyd Bill Boyd is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Landing field "12VA"
Posts: 1,108
Default Perfect segue opportunity here:

I'm tired of working on wingtip mounting hinges (got all 4 hinge pins in place and I'm declaring victory for now).

Have firewall insulation and SS foil ready to mount and seal with FireBarrier 2000 or whatever it's called. Before covering the firewall with fibrefrax and foil, I need to first rivet the forward top ribs to the firewall with 1/8" flush rivets, and the plans say to attach the top skin to them (in a very specific riveting pattern) before attaching the subassembly to the firewall.

I was going to rivet the ribs to the upper part of the firewall and put the top skin on later, after all necessary holes cut for avionics/wiring. May not have that luxury if the sequence detailed in the plans is critical for some as yet unappreciated reason.

I'm probably going Quik-Panel AFS or Dynon. Hopefully there wont be a lot of cabling to do upside down underneath the panel in "the position." Yeah, right. Any advise on what sequence to do this work in? I'm trying to keep the skins forward and aft of the cabin top off as long as possible, but there comes a time you run out of other things to do. I don't own an engine or avionics yet, so the airframe is all I have to expend my energies on.

I'm intermittently sanding and filling the cabin top and leveling/blending same with doors and side skins. Can't finish that work until the skins are all on. Transparencies from Cee Bailey soon, I hope.
__________________
Bill Boyd

Hop-Along Aerodrome (12VA)
RV-6A - N30YD - flying since '98
RV-10 - N130YD reserved - under construction

donating monthly to the VAF - thanks, Doug
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-27-2018, 06:54 PM
RV10Pilot RV10Pilot is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Medford, NJ USA
Posts: 103
Default

Lynn,
It will be much easier working on the cabin top, doors and windows when the fuselage is down low. Get all that done prior to putting the plane on its gear. It will save a ,it of work on a step stool or ladder.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-28-2018, 06:56 AM
Lynnb's Avatar
Lynnb Lynnb is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Cedar Hill, TX
Posts: 217
Default

Thanks for the info. I've actually already fitted the doors and done all the trimming to fit the top, door seals, rivet backing strips etc. I'm just still deciding on interior paint, working on a fiberglass overhead and some of that sort of stuff. I have a bit vertically challenged, that's why I've kept it off the gear for so long.

As always I appreciate the feedback.

Lynn
__________________
RV-10 in Process
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-28-2018, 08:35 AM
bluskydreamin bluskydreamin is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: midwest
Posts: 56
Default Same thoughts....

Bill. I was thinking the same with riveting the forward fuse structure on and adding the skin later after wiring and sub panel avionics boxes are mounted.

The other models have us do this. I guess it's a trade-off of lying on your back bucking rivets or trying to do the other tasks inverted... Either way we have to pay the Piper

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Boyd View Post
I'm tired of working on wingtip mounting hinges (got all 4 hinge pins in place and I'm declaring victory for now).

Have firewall insulation and SS foil ready to mount and seal with FireBarrier 2000 or whatever it's called. Before covering the firewall with fibrefrax and foil, I need to first rivet the forward top ribs to the firewall with 1/8" flush rivets, and the plans say to attach the top skin to them (in a very specific riveting pattern) before attaching the subassembly to the firewall.

I was going to rivet the ribs to the upper part of the firewall and put the top skin on later, after all necessary holes cut for avionics/wiring. May not have that luxury if the sequence detailed in the plans is critical for some as yet unappreciated reason.

I'm probably going Quik-Panel AFS or Dynon. Hopefully there wont be a lot of cabling to do upside down underneath the panel in "the position." Yeah, right. Any advise on what sequence to do this work in? I'm trying to keep the skins forward and aft of the cabin top off as long as possible, but there comes a time you run out of other things to do. I don't own an engine or avionics yet, so the airframe is all I have to expend my energies on.

I'm intermittently sanding and filling the cabin top and leveling/blending same with doors and side skins. Can't finish that work until the skins are all on. Transparencies from Cee Bailey soon, I hope.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 01-28-2018, 09:11 AM
Kyle Boatright Kyle Boatright is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 3,285
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bluskydreamin View Post
Bill. I was thinking the same with riveting the forward fuse structure on and adding the skin later after wiring and sub panel avionics boxes are mounted.
You can build the entire upper forward fuselage (UFF?) structure and NOT rivet it to the fuselage until after your cabin top is attached. If you do it that way, you can set the entire UFF on the bench and do a bunch of your subpanel and panel work on the bench - subpanel cuts, mounting locations for fuseblocks, AHRS units, panel cutting, etc. Then, pull that stuff off, and you can rivet the UFF in place and reinstall all of the bits and pieces. Much easier doing all of that on the bench than trying to do it in the footwell of misery.

The one thing you can't do until the UFF is riveted in place is install the windshield.
__________________
Kyle Boatright
Atlanta, GA
2001 RV-6 N46KB
2019(?) RV-10

Last edited by Kyle Boatright : 01-28-2018 at 09:20 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 01-28-2018, 10:04 AM
rocketman1988 rocketman1988 is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Sunman, IN
Posts: 1,023
Default Curious...

I am curious, I have pretty much planned out my avionics and I am not seeing many instances of laying in the footwell to do the wiring. Almost everything that is required will be accessible from the cabin. I do have the Aerosport symmetrical panel, so there are three rather large holes to work through.

I am not planning on putting anything between the sub panel and the firewall. Obviously, that area is rather inaccessible at all times. I do see the value of doing a bunch of avionics work prior to riveting the forward section, however, as I do not have my avionics yet, I went ahead and riveted. So far, I have not had to get in the footwell except to rivet the forward section.

I will say that driving some of the rivets from the firewall to the forward section substructure was very challenging as the engine mount is in the way...it's doable but would have been MUCH easier without the mount installed.

So, what task is going to require time in the footwell?
__________________
Bob
Aerospace Engineer '88

RV-10
Structure - 90% Done
Cabin Top - Aaarrghhh...
Doors - Done
On Gear
290 HP Barrett Hung
ShowPlanes Cowl with Skybolts Fitted - Beautiful

Dues Paid 2017,...Thanks DR+
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:39 PM.


The VAFForums come to you courtesy Delta Romeo, LLC. By viewing and participating in them you agree to build your plane using standardized methods and practices and to fly it safely and in accordance with the laws governing the country you are located in.