VansAirForceForums  
Home > VansAirForceForums

- POSTING RULES
- Donate yearly (please).
- Advertise in here!

- Today's Posts | Insert Pics

  #1  
Old 01-16-2018, 12:18 PM
unitink72 unitink72 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Cedar Rapids, IA
Posts: 141
Default Wire terminations

Quote:
Originally Posted by rv6ejguy View Post
One thing I'm not too keen on is people using vinyl clad crimp connectors in aircraft. They don't offer great strain relief. I prefer non-insulated ones, solder or crimp and then slide a long piece of double wall, glue infused heat shrink over the joint. Time consuming and a PITA to do in many locations and cases but WAY better strain relief, corrosion protection and retention qualities. See the photos below:



Brought this out from another thread. This makes a lot of sense to me. Where do you get these terminals, and the heat shrink tube? Do you need a different crimper than the one usually used for PIDG terminals?
__________________
Josh T
RV-10 #1750
N67SC reserved
http://n67sc.blogspot.com/
2018 Dues Paid
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-16-2018, 12:43 PM
WingsOnWheels WingsOnWheels is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Plano, TX
Posts: 1,299
Default

The PIDC terminals have proven to be very reliable, particularly over soldered terminals. There is not really a need to use the uninsulated terminals and heat-shrink. And don't solder them unless you know what you are doing, otherwise you will be far worse off.

Thant said, you can get the heat-shrink at Frys, Harbor freight, online, lots of places. For the terminals, order quality parts from an electronics vendor like digikey, mouser, stein, ACS.
__________________
Colin P.
RV-6A #20603: Emp done,Wings done, Fuselage done, Electrical done, FWF about done, Canopy done, Fiberglass/Finishing in work. Getting very close!
PP SEL / A&P
N616CG (Reserved)
I donate every year on my B-Day (in Dec)
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-16-2018, 01:47 PM
rv7charlie rv7charlie is offline
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Pocahontas MS
Posts: 2,755
Default

Minor correction; it's PIDG, not PIDC.

http://www.te.com/usa-en/products/te...?tab=pgp-story

The real PIDG has nylon insulation, which I believe is higher temp than vinyl. But firewall back, that really isn't an issue. (To head off the naysayers, *ALL* wire insulations omit noxious gasses if they get hot enough. Fuses/breakers prevent the wire overheating, and if the fire's already there and big enough to ignite wire insulation, you've got more pressing issues than wire insulation.)

Be aware that 'one and done' crimpers are not symmetrical; there's only one proper way to insert the terminal (though it will fit either way). Properly oriented, the insulation grip area gets slightly less crimp than the wire.

As others have said, solder and crimp are equally effective if done properly, and both need strain relief. PIDG has it built in; the bare terminals must have something added, whether crimped or soldered. Crimps were designed for production, where any meat sack is forced to make a proper crimp to get the tool off the work, and get it done fast. Solder takes a bit more skill & time, but costs a lot less money.

"You pays your money and you takes your choice."
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-16-2018, 02:01 PM
Raymo's Avatar
Raymo Raymo is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Richmond Hill, GA (KLHW)
Posts: 1,616
Default

I've been using and very happy with this heat shrink available online at reasonable cost. It is heavy duty and seals the connection. Getting it back off, on the other hand, is not so easy, which is means it seals very well.

You can get cheap stuff that is very thin (think HF) but you'll have to double it up, IMO.

Get it black or read and various sizes. Comes in 4' lengths.

I like AMP connectors/terminals for most jobs.
__________________
Ray
RV-7A - Slider - N495KL - First flt 27 Jan 17
O-360-A4M w/ Catto 3 blade NLE, AFP FM-150 FI, 1 PMag, Vetterman Trombone Exh, SkyTech starter,
PlanePower Alt, FlightLines Interior, James cowl & plenum
All lines by TSFlightLines
NSDQ

"The object of the game, gentlemen, is not to cheat death: the object is not to let him play."
Patrick Poteen, Sgt. U.S. Army
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-16-2018, 07:17 PM
johnbright's Avatar
johnbright johnbright is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Newport News, Va
Posts: 168
Default Anatomy of a Good Solderless Terminal Connection - AeroElectric Connectio

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sour...D2op80L8Ap1xJb
__________________
John Bright, RV-6A 25088, at FWF
O-360, 8.5:1, vert sump, SDSEFI EM-5
Z-14 adapted for EFI, wiring and IP CAD files here
Newport News, Va
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-16-2018, 07:18 PM
johnbright's Avatar
johnbright johnbright is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Newport News, Va
Posts: 168
Default Bob's Shop Notes: Chevy vs. Cadillac Crimp Tools

http://www.aeroelectric.com/articles...rimptools.html
__________________
John Bright, RV-6A 25088, at FWF
O-360, 8.5:1, vert sump, SDSEFI EM-5
Z-14 adapted for EFI, wiring and IP CAD files here
Newport News, Va
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-16-2018, 07:30 PM
pczar3's Avatar
pczar3 pczar3 is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Bolingbrook, Illiniois
Posts: 250
Default Was taught not to solder...

The reason was when soldering the solder will wick a small way up the wire and cause a rigid connection. The aviation grade wire has multiple strands for flexibility. Of course those were F4 Phantoms I was working on.


Paul
__________________
Paul
N694BP reserved
RV-6A Very Slow Build!
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-16-2018, 07:42 PM
rv7charlie rv7charlie is offline
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Pocahontas MS
Posts: 2,755
Default

Sigh...

We were taught to not go lean of peak on Lycs, too.

Look at that pic of the crimped connector before the shrink wrap is applied. Think there's no stress riser there?

Attachment method matters not. What does matter is supporting the wire beyond the stress riser point.

Sorry, but this solder/crimp thing just seems to be a bigger thing than primer wars, sometimes.

Charlie
No Holiday Inns recently, but a couple of past lives as an electronics tech.

Last edited by rv7charlie : 01-16-2018 at 08:34 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 01-17-2018, 06:17 AM
Walt's Avatar
Walt Walt is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Dallas/Ft Worth, TX
Posts: 4,618
Default

I agree that there is nothing wrong with a properly soldered, heat-shrinked and supported wire.

However, I can make a good solid crimped connection in about 2 seconds vs about 2 minutes or more to do a solder connection. If I was wiring your aircraft and getting paid by the hour which method would you want me to use

I'm pretty sure crimp connections were invented so the production world could save time.
__________________
Walt Aronow, Dallas, TX (52F) RV7A, IO360, C/S, 1500+hrs

EXP Aircraft Services LLC
Specializing in RV Condition Inspections, Maintenance, Avionics Upgrades
Dynamic Prop Balancing, Pitot-Static Altmeter/Transponder Certification
FAA Certified Repair Station, AP/IA/FCC GROL, EAA Technical Counselor
Authorized Garmin G3X Dealer/Installer
RV7A built 2004, 1700+ hrs
Website: ExpAircraft.com, Email: walt@expaircraft.com, Cell: 972-746-5154

Last edited by Walt : 01-17-2018 at 06:21 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 01-17-2018, 06:25 AM
rv7charlie rv7charlie is offline
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Pocahontas MS
Posts: 2,755
Default

Walt,
I agree. Please look back at what I wrote in post #3. I guess I should have completed the sentence with 'for parts and tools.'

Last edited by rv7charlie : 01-17-2018 at 06:28 AM.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:29 AM.


The VAFForums come to you courtesy Delta Romeo, LLC. By viewing and participating in them you agree to build your plane using standardized methods and practices and to fly it safely and in accordance with the laws governing the country you are located in.