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  #1  
Old 02-16-2017, 06:38 PM
TXFlyGuy TXFlyGuy is offline
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Jazz Town, USA, TX
Posts: 332
Default EFII Bus Manager

How many here are flying with the EFII Bus Manager? It looks pretty good, and actually is similar in some ways to the auto-bus tie switching we have on Boeings.
I contacted the company, and their claim was they have never experienced a failure of the bus manager.

What is your experience?

http://www.flyefii.com/products/bus-managaer/
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  #2  
Old 02-16-2017, 07:00 PM
rv7charlie rv7charlie is online now
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Pocahontas MS
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If you have an electrically dependent a/c (engine, and/or, if IFR capable, panel), get an actual schematic of the box's guts & analyze failure modes.

There was an extensive discussion on the Aeroelectric list recently.
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  #3  
Old 02-17-2017, 06:57 AM
TXFlyGuy TXFlyGuy is offline
 
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The company claims no failures. It does have an emergency selector to manually select a battery to power the essential bus in the event of a failure.

No one here flying with this?
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  #4  
Old 02-17-2017, 07:01 AM
rv7charlie rv7charlie is online now
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TXFlyGuy View Post
The company claims no failures. It does have an emergency selector to manually select a battery to power the essential bus in the event of a failure.

No one here flying with this?
See my previous post.
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  #5  
Old 02-17-2017, 07:20 AM
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jcaplins jcaplins is offline
 
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Location: Davis, CA, USA
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I have one; and my -7 requires electrons to keep the engine running.
I had a problem with the Fuel pump switch-over circuitry during the initial testing after install. The problem was was taken care of perfectly by EFII.

I'm happy with it and if I could make any changes, it would be to add an "off" positions to the fuel pumps. (as it stands you can only switch between "1/auto" and "2".) I may add something to the switch/relay circuit sometime in the future to take care of that.
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  #6  
Old 02-17-2017, 08:42 AM
TXFlyGuy TXFlyGuy is offline
 
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Location: Jazz Town, USA, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcaplins View Post
I have one; and my -7 requires electrons to keep the engine running.
I had a problem with the Fuel pump switch-over circuitry during the initial testing after install. The problem was was taken care of perfectly by EFII.

I'm happy with it and if I could make any changes, it would be to add an "off" positions to the fuel pumps. (as it stands you can only switch between "1/auto" and "2".) I may add something to the switch/relay circuit sometime in the future to take care of that.
Thanks. Our flight testing is a few months down the road. Good to hear that EFII gave you good support.
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  #7  
Old 02-17-2017, 04:57 PM
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johnbright johnbright is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Newport News, Va
Posts: 189
Default Aeroelectric LIst EFII discussion

Quote:
Originally Posted by rv7charlie View Post
If you have an electrically dependent a/c (engine, and/or, if IFR capable, panel), get an actual schematic of the box's guts & analyze failure modes.

There was an extensive discussion on the Aeroelectric list recently.
rv7charlie... do refer to this thread?
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O-360, 8.5:1, vert sump, SDSEFI EM-5
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  #8  
Old 02-17-2017, 05:40 PM
rv7charlie rv7charlie is online now
 
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That's one of them. IIRC, there's one where at least a 'flow chart' type internal diagram was posted. One of the 'selling points' was that it auto-managed power source switching in a multi-alternator and/or multi-battery system. That's the primary thing that bothered me (give failure analysis of *that* some thought...), though the fuel pump management issue is obviously significant, as well.

Everything's a compromise (except the exception we can't discuss), and everyone's got to pick their priorities on which tradeoffs to accept.

Charlie
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  #9  
Old 02-20-2017, 03:42 AM
TXFlyGuy TXFlyGuy is offline
 
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Location: Jazz Town, USA, TX
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Just heard back from the manufacturer. To date, the EFII Bus Manager has had zero failures in the field. None.

And, if there was a failure, the installed emergency power switch will restore battery power to the essential bus, keeping that engine making noise.

Zero failures...well, since I have been flying turbojet powered aircraft (1987-present), I have experienced zero engine failures.

The fact that the bus manager auto-manages power selection does not bother me. Just like the auto bus-tie relays we have on the big Boeing.

Last edited by TXFlyGuy : 02-20-2017 at 03:44 AM.
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  #10  
Old 02-20-2017, 12:09 PM
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rcpaisley rcpaisley is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Upland, CA
Posts: 245
Default EFII Bus Manager

The Bus Manager is a fun little box that does a number of things.
Most importantly, it provides two separate current paths to the engine electronics that do not require pilot intervention to manage.
The emergency power switch is a third level of redundancy on top of that.

We have many smart customers who have their own idea of how they would like to implement their electrical power distribution. I have reviewed many of these designs over the years. It's usually a bit amusing, because once someone gets a good design figured out, it usually looks a lot like the Bus Manager. Then they purchase a Bus Manager and move on.

For most experimentals, the Bus Manager can serve as the power distribution for the entire aircraft. The Main Bus output powering non flight critical systems and the Essential Bus output powering the critical engine systems. It can provide a drastic simplification to the task of implementing the aircraft power distribution.

We have close to 200 Bus Managers in the field. The only one that ever had a bus failure had one of its bus outputs shorted directly to ground during installation. (turn the power off when doing the wiring!).

They are over designed, very robust boxes. They have an internal cooling fan to limit the thermal range of the power components. But the box doesn't need the cooling fan and is thermally stable without it.

The fuel pump management is a great feature and works very nicely.

The main thing we are concerned about with electronically dependent engines is the protection of the 12v supply to the engine electronics. A wire coming loose at your battery is a simple fault that could happen to anyone. The Bus Manager keep the engine running in this case and in many similar cases.

The majority of our experienced installers who are familiar with our system put in a Bus Manager with every EFII installation. It's a low cost simple solution that provides lots of protection against electrical faults.

Robert Paisley
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