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  #41  
Old 01-12-2018, 01:25 PM
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Raymo Raymo is offline
 
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An option for flexible wiring is to buy an old phone handset coiled wire, cut the ends off and wire it in from your throttle quadrant. Very durable and no worries about wire chafing.
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  #42  
Old 01-12-2018, 01:51 PM
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RV8Squaz RV8Squaz is offline
 
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Location: Senoia, Georgia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yobo View Post
I have 2 radios and fly lots of formation, but I think my setup works great. I have an Infinity style grip with Radio 1 PTT on the trigger and Radio 2 PTT on the thumb button. No need to switch Comm 1&2 to transmit, just hit the correct button. I always use the Trigger for ATC/CTAF and Comm 2 for formation or ATIS/AWOS.

I would keep radios on the stick and smoke or flaps on the throttle. If I had 2 radios, I might put Comm2 on the throttle and comm1 on the stick.

On my stick: top right ó flip flop comm1 Freq. Coolie hat - trim. Top left (button) fires pyrotechnic Smoke. Thumb transmits Comm2. Trigger transmits Comm1. Pinkie button is TOGA.
Yobo,

I also fly a lot of formation. Iíve been wanting to do the same thing for years. In fact, Iíve had my second radio in the closet for about two years! I planned on putting my Comm 2 PTT on the throttle, but have also thought about doing it the way you did.

How did you wire it? Do you have a schematic? Are you using an audio panel? Or did you use some sort of relay scheme?

Thank you!
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  #43  
Old 01-12-2018, 02:51 PM
Breezy Breezy is offline
 
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Location: Okeana, Ohio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TShort View Post
Reviving an old thread ...

How did those of you who put the switch in the side of the throttle (as in the pic on the previous page) route wiring?

Considering placing the TO/GA switch in the throttle, and looking into ways to safely route the wires (DPST switch).

Thanks
I machined a slot in the throttle lever. Then ProSealed tubing in the slot as a conduit for wires. If needed the switch and wiring can be removed without quadrant dis-assembly.
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  #44  
Old 01-16-2018, 06:23 PM
Robert Anglin Robert Anglin is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: houston, texas
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Default Same here.

We found the same thing and put a PTT on the panel just under the throttle as well as the one on the stick. Two reasons it was done. One its a back up to the one on the stick. If you have ever lost a PTT in flight you will like the idea. Two we have a Garmin auto pilot and don't need to use the one on the stick while Auto is flying. Going long CX I find the one on the panel is used the most anyway. When maneuvering or close in to the airport the one on the stick is in hand anyway. The PTT is just a ground and you can put as many as you feel good with. I have an old Soft Com headset that I have always liked, going from one aircraft to another not sure if the mic or PTT would work, the headset has one on the lower edge of one of the ear cups. A good backup and we have had to use it when the primary went fault. I still fly with that headset from time to time so then I have three in the front seat. Just our take on this one. Your call. Yours, R.E.A. III # 80888
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  #45  
Old 01-17-2018, 05:46 AM
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Saville Saville is offline
 
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Location: KBVY Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Anglin View Post
We found the same thing and put a PTT on the panel just under the throttle as well as the one on the stick. Two reasons it was done. One its a back up to the one on the stick. If you have ever lost a PTT in flight you will like the idea. Two we have a Garmin auto pilot and don't need to use the one on the stick while Auto is flying. Going long CX I find the one on the panel is used the most anyway. When maneuvering or close in to the airport the one on the stick is in hand anyway. The PTT is just a ground and you can put as many as you feel good with. I have an old Soft Com headset that I have always liked, going from one aircraft to another not sure if the mic or PTT would work, the headset has one on the lower edge of one of the ear cups. A good backup and we have had to use it when the primary went fault. I still fly with that headset from time to time so then I have three in the front seat. Just our take on this one. Your call. Yours, R.E.A. III # 80888
You make good points here. I was debating whether to have it on the stick or the throttle - there are pros and cons for each location. But if, as you say, the PTT is merely connecting the ground then I could have it on both and have all the pros, none of the cons, and have a backup to boot.
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