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  #11  
Old 01-09-2018, 03:21 PM
pa38112 pa38112 is offline
 
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Location: Clarksboro, NJ
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Every specific job requires it's own tools, so the best approach is to buy them as you go. You might buy a rivet squeezer and never use it, or you might have a job that requires one and then you get it.
I would have a 0-200 in/lb torque wrench and a 0-75lb one.
A pair of 8", 10" and 12" hemostats often come in handy.
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  #12  
Old 01-09-2018, 03:41 PM
74-07 74-07 is offline
 
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Location: Greenville, SC
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Get one of these and never, ever loan it out. This will be your absolute favorite when it comes to condition inspection time and you have all those panels to open up.

https://youtu.be/-fiBoH2-Vn4
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  #13  
Old 01-09-2018, 05:04 PM
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Mark Albery Mark Albery is offline
 
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Location: Fremont CA
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Hi Rogier,

Congratulations on the RV-8! I look forward to seeing you and the -8 - maybe Oshkosh?

Most likely the first maintenance will be cowls off for the next oil change and general 50 hour check over. Best get some regular supplies in stock as well as tools.
Cowls off: Screwdrivers Philips #2 stubby etc and long nose pliers.
Spare crush gaskets for the oil gallery plug - AN900-16 on the O360
Lock wire .025 and .032, pliers - Milbar are best. Get the shorter ones, reversible not really necessary.
Torque wrench 1/4 drive 10 to 150/200 in.lb and 3/8 up to 400 in.lb. CDI are good, Harbor Freight $20 ones just about adequate. Sockets to match plus a long reach plug socket and 3/8 drive 1" socket for oil filter.
Spark plug gaskets - get a load and use a new one each time AN4027-1
General lubricant LPS2, Mouse milk
Spare oil & filter
For changing brake pads, spare pads and rivets 66-111, brake rivet tool - get the deluxe version with screw set.
Anti-seize grease .
Lots of spare #8 screws in various lengths and head types. Replace at the first sign of head damage.
Grease gun & aeroshell 6 for prop hub.
Grease and bearing greasing tool for wheel bearings.
Wheel jack.

That's a probably incomplete set to start and henceforth you'll be acquiring many more tools at the slightest excuse
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  #14  
Old 01-09-2018, 05:23 PM
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flyboy1963 flyboy1963 is offline
 
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Location: Lake Country, B.C. Canada
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Default the iron-clad absolutely infallible rule!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Westerhuis View Post
Hi

.....I just wondered what tools are 'must haves' when it comes to conducting some basic maintenance on an RV8. .....

R
This is pretty easy actually.

take every tool you own, put it in your truck. (borrow some if you have to, in order to achieve full max. GVW and/or the volumetric capacity of your vehicle.)

go to the airport 'just to wash the plane, and do a few circuits'

the tools you absolutely need, and can't even leave the ground without, are these:

a) the ones you left at home in your garden shed, other car, etc.
b) the ones you don't own yet, lost, haven't replaced/returned.
c) the ones unavailable to borrow, rent, buy on the field, at any price or day of the week

combine a) + b) + c) to produce your list.

...don't ask how I know this!
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  #15  
Old 01-09-2018, 05:26 PM
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RV7A Flyer RV7A Flyer is offline
 
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Location: US
Posts: 1,675
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So you, the OP, are getting lots of things conflated here, not that they're not all good bits of advice, but...again, organize your thinking.

There are
a) Consumables
b) Expendables
c) Tools
d) Spares

Consumables: Oil, filters, plugs, gaskets, greases, lubricants, safety wire, etc.
Expendables: Cleaning supplies, solvents, sprays
Tools: You know this category
Spares: Probes, fuses, connectors, batteries, etc.

You asked about tools, specifically, so again...think of your task (e.g., oil change) and figure out what tools you need for that task.

You can go nuts buying all sorts of tools which you never use if you just start randomly listing things and buying them. And that's coming from a total tool wh*re, who loves getting new tools and gizmos!
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  #16  
Old 01-10-2018, 08:56 PM
Westerhuis Westerhuis is offline
 
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Location: Boston (MA)
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Thanks for your advice guys - Some useful tips!
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  #17  
Old 01-11-2018, 06:41 PM
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Saville Saville is offline
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: KBVY Massachusetts
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So for the last couple flights I was losing 200 rpm on the runup. So I did the lean and run at 2k trick and that solved it.

But I'm bothered by the fact that it happened twice so I have to pull the plugs.

Never having done that before on an airplane (just a Briggs & Stratton lawn mower engine), I perused the VAF for information.

This is pertinent to the topic here because it means tool acquisition for the simplest of tasks. From what I gather one must have:

1) Proper sized extended socket for the plugs

2) Bag of new crush gaskets

3) solvent

4) anti-seize fluid

5) Some sort of torque wrench to torque the plugs back in at 30-35lbs.

...and the trickiest of all........

6) Some sort of sand blasting device

7) air hose to clean the sand out

8) dental pick to pick out the lead beads.

For pulling, cleaning and changing plugs that's quite a list.

According to posts in VAF the sand blaster can be a $40 item form Harbor Freight all the way up to a $900 gizmo that cleans, tests and lemon-freshens the plugs.


The one really useful bit of advice is to have spare plugs on hand so that the cleaning roadblock doesn't keep you from flying. Good idea that.

All this requires research (for a newbie):

is the torque really 30-35lbs for your engine?

some posts said it's tough to get a torque wrench on the plugs or see the dial.

Which crush gaskets?

Even which plugs?

This is one of the simpler maintenance chores but even so it seems like a lot of prep.
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  #18  
Old 01-11-2018, 07:41 PM
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snopercod snopercod is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saville View Post
...Some sort of sand blasting device
I solved that problem by taking my plugs to the maintenance shop at the FBO. They blasted, cleaned, and gapped my 8 plugs at a minimal cost. It took them about 10 minutes. IIRC, I paid them $20 because I'm a nice guy.

Yes, for a Lycoming, the correct torque is 35 ft. lb. You'll have to look it up if you have some other engine. There's a torque spec on the spark plug wire nut, too. I think it's 110 in. lb. but don't hold me to that.

Those copper gaskets are supposed to be changed every time for good heat transfer, and they're cheap so I do. I just bought a box of 100 of them from ACS.

Good idea on keeping a couple spare plugs around.

I guess there's a controversy on the anti-sieze. I use to use the Champion graphite liquid, but switched to Permatex Nickel Anti-Sieze, which is good to 2,400F. You're on your own there...
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  #19  
Old 01-11-2018, 08:03 PM
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Sam Buchanan Sam Buchanan is offline
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Location: North Alabama
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saville View Post
So for the last couple flights I was losing 200 rpm on the runup. So I did the lean and run at 2k trick and that solved it.

But I'm bothered by the fact that it happened twice so I have to pull the plugs.

Never having done that before on an airplane (just a Briggs & Stratton lawn mower engine), I perused the VAF for information.
I would strongly suggest you hire an A&P or an experienced RV builder to do this maintenance tasks for you the first time so you can watch and take notes on tools needed.

The questions you are asking are sorta spooking me (sorry) because these maintenance procedures could be life threatening if not performed correctly. An aircraft is not a forgiving machine on which to learn basic techniques. There are several bad things that can happen in the course of inspecting plugs:

Drop a plug
Cross thread a plug or torque it incorrectly (either can wipe out the threads in the cylinder...$$$$$$)
Fail to notice defects in the plug or harness
Damage a plug in the course of adjusting the gap or cleaning
Measure the gap incorrectly
Damage the harness due to improper handling

I'm sure I've omitted items but you get the thrust of what I'm saying. After seeing these tasks performed by someone with experience you may very well be ready to do them yourself...or you may not. That Briggs you worked on won't kill you if incorrectly maintained, but an aircraft sure can.

Get some help the first time around, use that experience to gather the correct tools, then enjoy maintaining your aircraft correctly and safely.
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Last edited by Sam Buchanan : 01-11-2018 at 08:05 PM.
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  #20  
Old 01-11-2018, 08:28 PM
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Saville Saville is offline
 
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Location: KBVY Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Buchanan View Post
I would strongly suggest you hire an A&P or an experienced RV builder to do this maintenance tasks for you the first time so you can watch and take notes on tools needed.

The questions you are asking are sorta spooking me (sorry) because these maintenance procedures could be life threatening if not performed correctly. An aircraft is not a forgiving machine on which to learn basic techniques. There are several bad things that can happen in the course of inspecting plugs:

Drop a plug
Cross thread a plug or torque it incorrectly (either can wipe out the threads in the cylinder...$$$$$$)
Fail to notice defects in the plug or harness
Damage a plug in the course of adjusting the gap or cleaning
Measure the gap incorrectly
Damage the harness due to improper handling

I'm sure I've omitted items but you get the thrust of what I'm saying. After seeing these tasks performed by someone with experience you may very well be ready to do them yourself...or you may not. That Briggs you worked on won't kill you if incorrectly maintained, but an aircraft sure can.

Get some help the first time around, use that experience to gather the correct tools, then enjoy maintaining your aircraft correctly and safely.


Sam I've already made arrangements with the FBO chief mechanic to bring the plane to his hangar next week so he can pull, check, clean re-install the plugs.

I already knew I don't know enough to do it myself. People who know me know I'm extremely...and I mean EXTREMELY careful and take no chances. The comment about the Briggs was to illustrate I have practically zero knowledge about this. But more importantly, that I KNOW I have practically zero knowledge about this.

I'm hoping I can get basic info from the mechanic as well as tips, and part numbers. Hopefully he will let me install one while he watches.

You should have noticed the questions I had - such as which plug and which crush gasket. That should tell you that I already know that I don't know the basics.

So you can relax. No need to be spooked.

But just remember that you have to start somewhere. And what my post was intended to to do was lay out the sorts of questions a newbie has to contend with in order to learn.
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Last edited by Saville : 01-11-2018 at 08:30 PM.
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