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  #21  
Old 02-26-2018, 03:56 AM
hendrik hendrik is offline
 
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Location: Heidelberg, Germany
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Mel will probably answer himself, but the problem I have with general statements like yours is that there are lots of things to be considered. People who are not experienced in structural mechanics are likely to miss some of them, and those who are experienced enough don't need your reminder.

I'm talking for example about loads in the spar/central fuse whilst on the ground, because there it's the fuse that carries the wing and not the other way round. Or load on the undercarriage ("upping gross weight"). Spinning characteristics (momentum of inertia). Dynamic loads. Plumbing details. Etc.

So while I agree with a statement like "there are advantages in putting the fuel into the wing", a statement that reads to the unexperienced like "the heavier the wing, the better" without detailed explanation might become dangerous.
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  #22  
Old 02-26-2018, 10:18 AM
rv7charlie rv7charlie is offline
 
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Location: Pocahontas MS
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mel View Post

Fuel is carried in the wings of airliners primarily because it is fluid and can take the shape of its container.
I don't claim to be an aero engineer, but that flies in the face of what a lot of aero engineers say....
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  #23  
Old 02-26-2018, 10:29 AM
SHIPCHIEF SHIPCHIEF is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Seattle
Posts: 1,369
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I got a 7 gallon seat tank:
https://www.leadingedgeairfoils.com/...mbination.html
It's for an ultralight, but it is well made. I've been trying it in various planes and even on my tractor (!).
It's too wide for a T-18. Fits fine in the back of my RV-8. Would fit a short person in the back of my wife's RV-4.
It has cast in nuts for mounting, but a builder would need to fabricate a mount at the desired seating angle, and install the sump fittings & vent according to your layout.
Right now it sits on my hangar floor looking hopeful...
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http://gallery.eaa326.org/v/members/semery/
EAA 668340, chapter 326 & IAC chapter 67
RV-8 N89SE first flight 12/26/2013
Yak55M, and the wife has an RV-4
There is nothing-absolute nothing-half so much worth doing as simply messing around with Aeroplanes
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  #24  
Old 02-26-2018, 02:46 PM
rv7charlie rv7charlie is offline
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Pocahontas MS
Posts: 3,203
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hendrik View Post
Mel will probably answer himself, but the problem I have with general statements like yours is that there are lots of things to be considered. People who are not experienced in structural mechanics are likely to miss some of them, and those who are experienced enough don't need your reminder.

I'm talking for example about loads in the spar/central fuse whilst on the ground, because there it's the fuse that carries the wing and not the other way round. Or load on the undercarriage ("upping gross weight"). Spinning characteristics (momentum of inertia). Dynamic loads. Plumbing details. Etc.

So while I agree with a statement like "there are advantages in putting the fuel into the wing", a statement that reads to the unexperienced like "the heavier the wing, the better" without detailed explanation might become dangerous.
On the other hand, a statement, by someone we're supposed to trust as an authority on these things, that plainly states (instead of being misinterpreted by the reader) that the primary reason that fuel is put in the wings is because it's liquid is both dangerous and total nonsense (and which also could bite the 'unexperienced').
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  #25  
Old 02-26-2018, 03:24 PM
hendrik hendrik is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Heidelberg, Germany
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rv7charlie View Post
On the other hand, a statement, by someone we're supposed to trust as an authority on these things, that plainly states (instead of being misinterpreted by the reader) that the primary reason that fuel is put in the wings is because it's liquid is both dangerous and total nonsense (and which also could bite the 'unexperienced').
Absolutely.
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