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  #141  
Old 12-01-2018, 02:05 PM
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rv6ejguy rv6ejguy is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rocketbob View Post
I was having problems in my Audi with the turbo seals, excessive smoke, and oil consumption. Was using Mobil 1 full synthetic until an oil expert advised to not run a full-synthetic oil. Smoking and coking problems stopped immediately going to a semi-synthetic oil of the same weight. Oil consumption was reduced 90%. I was shocked because I was always under the impression synthetics were superior.
I've used Mobil 1 since the early eighties and fed it to all my many turbo engines I've owned over the years (dozens) and many, many thousands of hours collectively. Never a lubrication failure in the engines or turbos or coking issues. I used to overhaul turbos for a living as well. Never seen coking with Mobil 1 but seen lots with conventional oils. Look at the coking and flash points for it compared to other oils.

My high time Garrett turbo in our shop car had over 5000 hard hours on it using Mobil 1. Turbo never touched in 19 years, never smoked, bearings still tight.

Early Audis with KKK units were well known for turbine ring sealing issues and smoking. I fixed many of them back in the day. Bad design with too much oil being shot at the ring seal. I plugged one of the oil feed holes on these and problems never returned. One of these K27s (to fit Audi) on a Toyota custom installation I did went on for over 15 years and several owners and thousands of hours, no bearing, seal or smoking issues- all on Mobil one.

Hard to believe an oil with superior high temperature anti coking properties was the cause of your smoking issue.
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Ross Farnham, Calgary, Alberta
Turbo Subaru EJ22, SDS EFI, Marcotte M-300, IVO, RV6A C-GVZX flying from CYBW since 2003- 426.1 hrs. on the Hobbs,
RV10 95% built- Sold 2016
http://www.sdsefi.com/aircraft.html
http://sdsefi.com/cpi.htm


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  #142  
Old 12-02-2018, 09:53 PM
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charosenz charosenz is offline
 
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Location: Longview, Wash
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rv6ejguy View Post
You can see most of my rad development stuff near the end of these 2 pages:

http://www.sdsefi.com/rv16.htm

http://www.sdsefi.com/rv17.htm

There are so many separate pages on our site, it's hard to build a search feature at this point. You can try the Control F command on each page to find something specific.
Ross, thanks for posting the links.....

Anyone who has a interest to venture in to the power plant side of aircraft building will benefit greatly from the huge source of information that you provide on your website.

Thanks again.

Charlie
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  #143  
Old 12-03-2018, 07:12 AM
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rv6ejguy rv6ejguy is offline
 
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I'll try to dig up the actual size/area/volume specifics on my rad installation and post them here later today when I get some time.
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Ross Farnham, Calgary, Alberta
Turbo Subaru EJ22, SDS EFI, Marcotte M-300, IVO, RV6A C-GVZX flying from CYBW since 2003- 426.1 hrs. on the Hobbs,
RV10 95% built- Sold 2016
http://www.sdsefi.com/aircraft.html
http://sdsefi.com/cpi.htm


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  #144  
Old 12-03-2018, 09:46 AM
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rv6ejguy rv6ejguy is offline
 
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This is from another forum post:

Inlet area 29.5 in2
closed outlet area 16.8 in2
open outlet area 51.5 in2
radiator face area 118.8 in2
rad core volume 267.3 in3
rad core depth 2.25 in
tube dimensions .080 x 1.00, 2 rows
tube spacing .4375in
fin density 14/in

total duct length 49 inches
coolant flow is horizontal

The duct uses a central, vertical splitter and two horizontal guide vanes to turn the air without separation (shown after tuft testing). Main divergent duct angle is <7 degrees.

Rad tanks are not exposed to the airstream, only the core matrix.

Core is fed by .75 tubing for coolant, run a standard OEM thermostat with single .125 inch safety hole in base. Rad is perpendicular to the freestream.

Takeoff power is about 160hp at 35 inches and 4600 rpm.

I was able to idle at 1000 engine rpm for 45 minutes at an OAT of +27C with coolant stabilizing at 90C. There are no supplemental fans fitted, just the big one out front...

Coolant mix is 70% H2O, 30% Prestone Ethylene glycol and a tiny percentage of Redline Water Wetter.

Duct inlet lip radius is .125in.

I used some ideas from Russell Sherwood's SARL championship winning Subaru EG33 powered Glasair. He had very similar experiences and design features to what I ended up with. He uses only 32 in2 of inlet area for 230hp and he says he will reduce this further as it is still bigger than required. He can close his exit door down to I believe 22 in2 at high speed cruise. Ground cooling is no issue up to 35C as long as aircraft is not pointed downwind.

What we have learned so far actually flying these installations is:

1. That you don't need huge rad piping for the coolant. "Experts" told me my engine would not cool with 3/4 tubing.

2. You don't need huge rad face area or volumes.

3. You don't need huge inlet areas or large inlet lip radii even in climb. Again, "Experts" said we'd never cool.

We have 3 flying aircraft using similar designs and ratios to this per installed hp. All 3 cool very well under all conditions having accumulated over 1100 flight hours to date (2014).
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Ross Farnham, Calgary, Alberta
Turbo Subaru EJ22, SDS EFI, Marcotte M-300, IVO, RV6A C-GVZX flying from CYBW since 2003- 426.1 hrs. on the Hobbs,
RV10 95% built- Sold 2016
http://www.sdsefi.com/aircraft.html
http://sdsefi.com/cpi.htm



Last edited by rv6ejguy : 12-03-2018 at 09:55 AM.
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  #145  
Old 12-04-2018, 11:06 PM
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charosenz charosenz is offline
 
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Ross,

Your last post detailing the specs on your radiator/ducting set up is invaluable to those of us who venture down the water-cooled engine installation journey, thank you!

I know you live near Santa Claus, but that said, I am curious how often you actually vary the outlet opening with the push-pull cable?

It seems as though the ability to vary the outlet opening is tantamount to the function of the thermostat.

Charlie
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  #146  
Old 12-05-2018, 07:25 AM
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rv6ejguy rv6ejguy is offline
 
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The cooling is so good, I leave it closed most of the time. I'll open it on the ground during a long hold or on a long climb on a hot day.

In the winter, I block off 50% of the rad with a foam insert and block off 30% of the heater core face as well. The door remains closed all time in the winter even with these things done. On final, it will still drop to 140F.

The heater core is in the thermostat loop and provides a lot of cooling. The thermostat does not have control over that water flow
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Ross Farnham, Calgary, Alberta
Turbo Subaru EJ22, SDS EFI, Marcotte M-300, IVO, RV6A C-GVZX flying from CYBW since 2003- 426.1 hrs. on the Hobbs,
RV10 95% built- Sold 2016
http://www.sdsefi.com/aircraft.html
http://sdsefi.com/cpi.htm


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  #147  
Old 12-05-2018, 09:58 PM
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charosenz charosenz is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rv6ejguy View Post
The cooling is so good, I leave it closed most of the time. I'll open it on the ground during a long hold or on a long climb on a hot day.

In the winter, I block off 50% of the rad with a foam insert and block off 30% of the heater core face as well. The door remains closed all time in the winter even with these things done. On final, it will still drop to 140F.

The heater core is in the thermostat loop and provides a lot of cooling. The thermostat does not have control over that water flow
Ross,

This really proves the design is certainly more than sufficient.

To clarify.....you said the heater core is in the thermostat loop...but then said the thermostat does not have control over that loop. Did you mean to say it this way? Or did you mean to say the thermostat is not in the heater core loop....

Charlie
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  #148  
Old 12-06-2018, 07:09 AM
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rv6ejguy rv6ejguy is offline
 
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Most auto engines for the last 30 years have the heater core flowing coolant all the time with no valve in the flow like the old days-they just mix hot and cold air with the heater control. This means the heater core coolant flow bypasses the thermostat all the time.

I take hot air off about 30% of the core through twin 2 inch SCAT hoses and the rest bypasses so the core offers a bit more cooling capacity for the engine at all times.

I don't use any other bypass hose in my setup for the thermostat. The heater core in plumbed with 5/8 hose.

On days below -10C, the heater core alone is sufficient to cool the engine in cruise below 25 inches. The thermostat never opens. The core is fed by a single ram duct via 3" SCAT hose and a difuser with internal guide vanes to spread the flow over the whole core face. The core is 8 X 8 X 1.625
__________________

Ross Farnham, Calgary, Alberta
Turbo Subaru EJ22, SDS EFI, Marcotte M-300, IVO, RV6A C-GVZX flying from CYBW since 2003- 426.1 hrs. on the Hobbs,
RV10 95% built- Sold 2016
http://www.sdsefi.com/aircraft.html
http://sdsefi.com/cpi.htm



Last edited by rv6ejguy : 12-06-2018 at 07:14 AM.
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  #149  
Old 12-06-2018, 08:26 PM
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charosenz charosenz is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rv6ejguy View Post
Most auto engines for the last 30 years have the heater core flowing coolant all the time with no valve in the flow like the old days-they just mix hot and cold air with the heater control. This means the heater core coolant flow bypasses the thermostat all the time.

I take hot air off about 30% of the core through twin 2 inch SCAT hoses and the rest bypasses so the core offers a bit more cooling capacity for the engine at all times.

I don't use any other bypass hose in my setup for the thermostat. The heater core in plumbed with 5/8 hose.

On days below -10C, the heater core alone is sufficient to cool the engine in cruise below 25 inches. The thermostat never opens. The core is fed by a single ram duct via 3" SCAT hose and a difuser with internal guide vanes to spread the flow over the whole core face. The core is 8 X 8 X 1.625
Ross, yes, what you describe is exactly how the R18 Honda engine I am using is set up.

The only part that threw me was when you wrote that.. "the heater core is in the thermostat loop". But I think that was a mis-statement, and that you meant to write the "heater core is in the bypass loop" . I apologize if it sounds like I am being too picky, I just wanted it clarified in case others who read this may have taken it the way it was written. (or may be I understand it wrong!)

Thank you.

Charlie

Last edited by charosenz : 12-06-2018 at 08:31 PM.
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  #150  
Old 12-07-2018, 06:57 AM
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rv6ejguy rv6ejguy is offline
 
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The heater core provides the bypass flow to activate the thermostat when it's closed. The heater core fitting aims directly at the T stat bulb on my Subaru. No other bypass hose is used.

With the T stat on the suction side of water pump, you must have some sort of bypass or it will never open as some folks have found out the hard way when they plugged it off or left the heater core out of their installation.

My installation has a big enough heater core to fly at low cruise without over heating even if the T stat was stuck closed which gives some more piece of mind.
__________________

Ross Farnham, Calgary, Alberta
Turbo Subaru EJ22, SDS EFI, Marcotte M-300, IVO, RV6A C-GVZX flying from CYBW since 2003- 426.1 hrs. on the Hobbs,
RV10 95% built- Sold 2016
http://www.sdsefi.com/aircraft.html
http://sdsefi.com/cpi.htm


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