VansAirForceForums  
Home > VansAirForceForums

- POSTING RULES
- Donate yearly (please).
- Advertise in here!

- Today's Posts | Insert Pics


Go Back   VAF Forums > Model Specific > RV-12
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #11  
Old 04-17-2017, 12:58 PM
rvbuilder2002 rvbuilder2002 is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Hubbard Oregon
Posts: 6,970
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim T View Post
Sorry Scott..........didn't mean to push your button.
You didn't "push my button" at all Jim.
I am just talking facts rather than opinion (the reason the last line says "I am confident that no one is likely to find a different construction method that will be as light or for anywhere close to the same cost.......")

It is a viable and likely optimal way to do it if weight and cost are important engineering goals.

If those aren't goals (in an airplane like the RV-12 the first one is a very high priority), there are a lot of other ways a tank could be produced.
__________________
Any opinions expressed in this message are my own and not necessarily those of my employer.

Scott McDaniels
Hubbard, Oregon
RV-6A (aka "Junkyard Special ")
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 04-17-2017, 01:42 PM
Canadian_JOY Canadian_JOY is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,401
Default

Just a data point to add to this discussion...

Glasair supplies welded tanks for the Sportsman. There is a service bulletin from the early days when some of the welds were porous. Since that small batch of tanks which contained what amounts to a manufacturer's defect, there have been no significant issues with fuel tanks.

By the same token, Stoddard-Hamilton also shipped some plastic moulded tanks for the Glastar. They quickly became pretty famous for leaks which were resolved only by replacing the tanks with the welded aluminum ones.

Zenith also provides welded tanks for aircraft like the CH750.

While the Vans standard method is a good method of fabricating tanks, a search on this forum will reveal multiple threads talking about leaking tanks. As was mentioned earlier, every design/build decision is an exercise in balancing compromises. One needs to be happy with the compromises Van and team have chosen.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 04-17-2017, 03:50 PM
Jim T Jim T is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Independence, OR
Posts: 169
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rvbuilder2002 View Post
You didn't "push my button" at all Jim.
I am just talking facts rather than opinion (the reason the last line says "I am confident that no one is likely to find a different construction method that will be as light or for anywhere close to the same cost.......")

It is a viable and likely optimal way to do it if weight and cost are important engineering goals.

If those aren't goals (in an airplane like the RV-12 the first one is a very high priority), there are a lot of other ways a tank could be produced.
We're definitely on the same page Scott. I can't believe how light my tank is and as expensive as a welded tank would be, I'd rather build mine like I did. Plus, if I built it, I can also fix it if needed. My neighbor is building a Rans S-20 and both of his plastic tanks have had leaks.

"Crude" probably wasn't the best way to describe the tank construction ..........I just couldn't think of another word to use at the time.

Jim
__________________
RV-12 kit no.: 120647
Working on finish kit
http://www.mykitlog.com/JimT

2006 Rans S-6S Coyote (flying)
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 04-17-2017, 07:12 PM
Tomcat RV4 Tomcat RV4 is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Jacksonville,Fl. 32246
Posts: 173
Default

Any body coated tanks with clear epoxy ? It was suggested by tech counseled with -6 ? Seriously šonsidering , as it would be paintable, and not affected by fuel !
__________________
Tomcat RV4
dues paid and worth every penny
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 04-18-2017, 10:29 AM
Canadian_JOY Canadian_JOY is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,401
Default

Derakane vinyl-ester epoxy (used in Glasair fuselages) has excellent characteristics for fuel tanks. In fact it is used to fabricate fuel storage tanks in the petroleum industry. It obviously has decent structural characteristics as well, since it has successfully been used in the construction of quite a few aircraft. It responds best to vacuum bagging as air-cured Derakane never really cures and remains slightly "gummy" to the touch.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:37 AM.


The VAFForums come to you courtesy Delta Romeo, LLC. By viewing and participating in them you agree to build your plane using standardized methods and practices and to fly it safely and in accordance with the laws governing the country you are located in.