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  #1  
Old 03-08-2020, 06:45 PM
GHARBEN GHARBEN is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Location: Gainesville, Georgia
Posts: 17
Default New Pilot Questions

Just started flying N12HR. An RV 4 with 800 hours.
Do most people 3 point od wheel land in crosswinds. Also is it legal to file IFR in a properly equipped RV 4?
Thanks
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  #2  
Old 03-08-2020, 06:53 PM
swjohnsey swjohnsey is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Kingsville, TX
Posts: 113
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GHARBEN View Post
Just started flying N12HR. An RV 4 with 800 hours.
Do most people 3 point od wheel land in crosswinds. Also is it legal to file IFR in a properly equipped RV 4?
Thanks
I am flying an RV-4 first flew in 1990, I think it has short gear. It seems to do best wheel landing. Sometime when I get a little slow it will turn into a 3 point.
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  #3  
Old 03-08-2020, 06:54 PM
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Vern Vern is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Peachtree City, Ga
Posts: 1,032
Smile Congrats!

Regarding your IFR question, I refer you to your Operating Limitations document which is required to be in the plane for flight. Most have verbiage similar to “if equipped i.a.w FAR xxx, IFR operations are permitted. “
Same for night operations.

Welcome aboard!
Vern
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  #4  
Old 03-08-2020, 07:28 PM
GHARBEN GHARBEN is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Location: Gainesville, Georgia
Posts: 17
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Thanks for your quick reply!
I will check my paperwork
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  #5  
Old 03-09-2020, 11:46 AM
Christopher Murphy Christopher Murphy is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: colorado
Posts: 857
Default Wheel landings

You will get a lot of opinions on this.

I only 3 point occasionally for practice but I prefer to wheel it in cross winds or gusty conditions. The -4 can handle a pretty tough xwind in the hands of a proficient and skilled

https://youtu.be/IzumJUl6POc

https://youtu.be/y7Dy1dG4Hh8


Cm
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Last edited by Christopher Murphy : 03-09-2020 at 12:42 PM. Reason: Add link
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  #6  
Old 03-10-2020, 08:20 AM
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daddyman daddyman is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Fredericksburg, Virginia
Posts: 277
Default Its fine

Quote:
Originally Posted by GHARBEN View Post
Just started flying N12HR. An RV 4 with 800 hours.
Do most people 3 point od wheel land in crosswinds. Also is it legal to file IFR in a properly equipped RV 4?
Thanks
GHARBEN,
Yes it is legal provided of course that you are IFR and current.
I've found without an autopilot, they can be a handful in hard IFR conditions.
Also lack of de-ice and heat could be a bummer.

Ahhh, the age old question of wheelies vs 3 pt, with about 800 hrs in my -4, I personally like the smoothness of wheel landings. So do my back-seaters. So at runways of about 2900 ft+ they are sweet.
For short field I fly my AOA indicator and use all 3 wheels. Landings are not as pretty but consistently 500-650 ft on grass.

Happy Landings,
Daddyman
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  #7  
Old 03-10-2020, 11:15 AM
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smokyray smokyray is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: TX32
Posts: 1,877
Default It depends....

Quote:
Originally Posted by GHARBEN View Post
Just started flying N12HR. An RV 4 with 800 hours.
Do most people 3 point od wheel land in crosswinds. Also is it legal to file IFR in a properly equipped RV 4?
Thanks
Hey GH,
I started flying my early model short gear Four when we had to shoo dinosaurs off the runway before taking off!
My dos centavos has always been to wheels land on pavement, especially in a cross wind (better rudder authority, visibility) and three point on grass, soft turf or dirt. Better prop clearance, less chance of flip over, even distribution of weight etc..
As far a filing IFR, remember what’s written on the canopy bow “Experimental” RVs can never be certified IFR since they were never certified in the first place. You can comply with the FIH requirements for operating in IMC which are:
A. Way to determine attitude
B. Way to determine altitude (within IFR tolerances)
C. Way to determine the final approach course of a non precision approach
D. Pitot static system and mode C certification by a qualified shop with associated logbook entry.

You have chosen wisely...
V/R
Smokey

PS: If you bump into Jentezen Franklin, tell him hi for me!
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  #8  
Old 03-11-2020, 05:03 AM
Boyd Birchler Boyd Birchler is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: IN
Posts: 251
Default

I'm sorry but after many thousands of TW hours I think it is a bit of a myth that you need to wheel land in a cross wind. Yes of course I can do it, but why?

If you land with a direct cross wind, I will agree: you can stick it on the runway with a lot more cross wind component than landing with a three point. The problem is you still need to get the tail down on the runway and you cannot put the tailwheel down in most taildraggers until you are at or nearly at stall speed. This is because most taildraggers are built so that the deck angle setting on the ground is at (or exceeds) the wings stall angle of attack.

If, after pinning the mains on during an extreme crosswind, I am on the ground with the mains rolling with the tail still up, as I slow the rudder becomes less effective at keeping me straight by shoving the tail into the crosswind. The slower I get the less my ability to keep the slowing plane aligned with the runway. Should it occur that I run out of rudder authority prior to being below stall speed I will depart the runway into the wind.

If I were to attempt to land on the same runway three point I would most likely go some where else if I could not get enough rudder at stall speed to keep the plane in alignment with the runway. The difference is with the 3 point I will know this with no ground contact, but with the wheel landing I find it out with the mains ( perhaps only one up wind wheel) firmly on the ground.

Whether I wheel land or 3 point the tail has to come down at or near stall speed, with the 3 point this all occurs at the same time and you do not have those moments in between as the rudder looses effectiveness while the tail wheel is not yest in contact firmly on the runway.
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  #9  
Old 03-11-2020, 12:02 PM
BobTurner BobTurner is online now
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Livermore, CA
Posts: 6,445
Default

I see several conflicting posts wrt ifr operations. The FARs limit EAB aircraft to day, vfr operation. So to operate at night, or under IFR, you must see a waiver in your operating limitations. It will read something like “Operation is limited to day-VFR, unless equipped per far 91.xxx” (the fars detailing equipment required for night and/or IFR).
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  #10  
Old 03-11-2020, 01:30 PM
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Sam Buchanan Sam Buchanan is offline
been here awhile
 
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Location: North Alabama
Posts: 4,230
Default

FAR 91.205
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