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  #1  
Old 05-30-2019, 09:54 AM
Cyclone Cyclone is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Grinnell,IA
Posts: 42
Default 912ULS Not Charging

Initial engine start, everything in green except battery amps.
Battery at 12.8 volts prior to start. Warmup at 2500 rpm then up to 4000rpm - battery amps remained at -5 with battery volts gradually dropping to 12.4. Any suggestions on resources and methods to trouble shoot? Not seeing specifics in Rotax manuals. Silent Hektik regulator.

Thanks for your help... Denny
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Rv-12. Empennage done
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  #2  
Old 05-30-2019, 10:41 AM
pilotyoung pilotyoung is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Birmingham, AL
Posts: 117
Default 912 ULSA Not Charging

If it is wired the original way, power to turn it on comes through a 1 amp fuse on the switch module that is soldered on the circuit board. Check to see if you have 12 volts on C Terminal (This is memory because my documents are at the hangar). I blew that fuse while doing some modifications last summer.

Van's now has an alternative wiring plan where two terminals on the VR are jumpered. Again from memory, I think they are the B & C terminals. But if you look at the Notice or SB on Van's site that changes the VR to the Silent Hektik, it provides the details there.
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Bought it as a flying airplane in Feb. 2018
Just passed 140 hours flight time in RV-12, and 10,000 hours mostly in corporate jets. I am a CFI; CFII; MEI; and a advancd Ground Instructor, CFIG; and hoping to be able to help new RV-12 owners by doing some transition training for new builders and owners in RV-12's.
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  #3  
Old 05-30-2019, 04:04 PM
Cyclone Cyclone is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Grinnell,IA
Posts: 42
Default Thanks

Somewhere in the process I left the C spade vacant. After looking at the wiring diagram it needs a 12 volt jumper from the B+ terminal. I think tomorrow I'll have a system that's charging.
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Rv-12. Empennage done
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Finish kit done
Avionics in
Painted
Firewall forward in progress

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As long as I don't buy anything"
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  #4  
Old 05-30-2019, 06:32 PM
Mich48041 Mich48041 is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Riley TWP MI
Posts: 2,838
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Keep in mind that the master switch turns the regulator on or off. If terminal "C" is jumped to terminal "B", then there is no way to shut off electrical power while flying. If there is smoke in the cockpit due to an electrical problem, shutting off the master switch will have no effect. The electrical power is coming from the alternator with no way to shut it off except to stop the engine.
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  #5  
Old 05-30-2019, 11:04 PM
RFSchaller RFSchaller is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 2,459
Default

Joe,

Couldn’t you still pull the 30 amp output fuse?

Rich
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  #6  
Old 05-31-2019, 06:51 AM
Mich48041 Mich48041 is offline
 
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Location: Riley TWP MI
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Rich, yes, you are right. I forgot about the fuse.
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  #7  
Old 05-31-2019, 11:38 AM
Mich48041 Mich48041 is offline
 
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Location: Riley TWP MI
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Default ERROR CHAIN

Aviation magazines have published articles about an "Error Chain" leading to an accident. The pilot ignores just one minor problem that sets up an accident when combined with other unexpected events. Bypassing a blown fuse with a jumper wire could turn out to be one link in an error chain. Below are some more links in a chain that could lead to an accident:
The designer locates the fuse where it is difficult and expensive to replace.
The builder blows the fuse and installs a jumper around both the fuse and master switch.
Another pilot buys the aircraft and is unaware of the jumper.
The new pilot does not become familiar with the aircraft electrical system.
The new pilot flies in instrument conditions or at night.
The voltage regulator, which is mounted inside of the cockpit, fails due to cheap parts and poor quality control.
The voltage regulator gives off lots of smoke which stings the pilot's eyes.
The pilot shuts off the master switch and opens the air vents.
The pilot becomes disorientated while being distracted.
Every one of the above have occurred more than once in different aircraft, but luckily not in one aircraft or at the same time.
If an accident happens, who is to blame?
Wouldn't it be better to locate the fuse where it can be easily replaced?
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  #8  
Old 05-31-2019, 12:45 PM
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Tony_T Tony_T is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Lacey, WA
Posts: 1,251
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mich48041 View Post
Aviation magazines have published articles about an "Error Chain" leading to an accident. The pilot ignores just one minor problem that sets up an accident when combined with other unexpected events. Bypassing a blown fuse with a jumper wire could turn out to be one link in an error chain. Below are some more links in a chain that could lead to an accident:
The designer locates the fuse where it is difficult and expensive to replace.
The builder blows the fuse and installs a jumper around both the fuse and master switch.
Another pilot buys the aircraft and is unaware of the jumper.
The new pilot does not become familiar with the aircraft electrical system.
The new pilot flies in instrument conditions or at night.
The voltage regulator, which is mounted inside of the cockpit, fails due to cheap parts and poor quality control.
The voltage regulator gives off lots of smoke which stings the pilot's eyes.
The pilot shuts off the master switch and opens the air vents.
The pilot becomes disorientated while being distracted.
Every one of the above have occurred more than once in different aircraft, but luckily not in one aircraft or at the same time.
If an accident happens, who is to blame?
Wouldn't it be better to locate the fuse where it can be easily replaced?
I agree that the proper fix would be to relocate the fuse for the regulator activation yellow wire, and NOT use the jumper fix.

That said, your post implies that there is a jumper used to activate the Ducati regulator mounted inside the cockpit and that is not so. I can find no plans or instances where the jumper was used with the Ducati either on the firewall or inside the cockpit. The jumper wire is installed only on the SH regulator mounted on the upper firewall as in the iS. And I can find no instructions by Vans to install the SH regulator inside the cockpit or to install the jumper on the Ducati. I have been following all these developments for a while and can't remember anyone with a Ducati blowing the fuse in the switch module and needing to install a jumper.

Summarizing, those of us with the Ducati mounted inside the cockpit (or outside) should not be alarmed regarding the yellow jumper wire used on the SH installation as our regulator should not be equipped with a jumper wire and Master switch should shut down our regulators.


The latest POH does state that the 30 amp main generator fuse is to be pulled in the event of an electrical fire. That fuse does disconnect the generator and shut down the SH regulator but it does not disconnect the battery. The Master still needs to be shut off if there is something else causing the smoke.

Of course if one were to be buying a used -12, anything is possible as far as mods to the electrical system are concerned.
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RV-12 #202 -- Flying

Last edited by Tony_T : 05-31-2019 at 12:56 PM. Reason: clarification
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  #9  
Old 05-31-2019, 02:08 PM
Mich48041 Mich48041 is offline
 
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Location: Riley TWP MI
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I never said that the plans called for putting a jumper wire between regulator terminals B & C. But some RV-12 owners have done it after blowing the fuse. My post was meant to discourage others from doing that.
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  #10  
Old 05-31-2019, 02:12 PM
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Tony_T Tony_T is offline
 
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Location: Lacey, WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mich48041 View Post
I never said that the plans called for putting a jumper wire between regulator terminals B & C. But some RV-12 owners have done it after blowing the fuse. My post was meant to discourage others from doing that.
Yes, I understood that. Just trying to be clear about when the jumper is used.
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