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  #81  
Old 07-15-2018, 09:44 AM
rv6ejguy's Avatar
rv6ejguy rv6ejguy is offline
 
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We supply all the hardware to mount this bracket- bolts, nuts, washers, Adel clamps, standoff.

Like Ashley said, these coils are engine mounted in the OEM applications so are designed to see a lot of heat and vibration. The underhood temps on some cars with massive cast iron manifolds and turbochargers releasing a lot of that stored heat on shutdown is probably higher than our aircraft see in many cases.

We've been selling these coil packs on our 6 cylinder CPIs and EM-5 systems for 3 years now. Zero failures to my knowledge. We've been selling the 4 cylinder ones since 2008 (integrated drivers), hundreds to date and again zero failures.

This coil hardware is much more reliable IMO than that used by some of the other EI manufacturers where we've seen multiple failures reported here on VAF and elsewhere- heat related and vibration failures of their exposed terminal connections are common. The connectors on these coils shown are really bulletproof.
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Ross Farnham, Calgary, Alberta
Turbo Subaru EJ22, SDS EFI, Marcotte M-300, IVO, RV6A C-GVZX flying from CYBW since 2003- 426.1 hrs. on the Hobbs,
RV10 95% built- Sold 2016
http://www.sdsefi.com/aircraft.html
http://sdsefi.com/cpi.htm


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  #82  
Old 07-16-2018, 11:12 PM
svyolo svyolo is offline
 
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Location: bellingham, wa
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Connector quality is one of the unsung heroes of modern car reliability. Using these, especially forward of the firewall, is one of my reasons for trusting EFI. All of my power distribution will be using Delphi style connectors.
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  #83  
Old 08-25-2018, 05:37 PM
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rv6ejguy rv6ejguy is offline
 
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Default Show Planes RV-10 Intake System to fit SDS EFI TB

Here are a couple phones of the new Show Planes intake system to fit the SDS Aero 80mm throttle body and Barrett cold air intake.





Their usual nice work.
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Ross Farnham, Calgary, Alberta
Turbo Subaru EJ22, SDS EFI, Marcotte M-300, IVO, RV6A C-GVZX flying from CYBW since 2003- 426.1 hrs. on the Hobbs,
RV10 95% built- Sold 2016
http://www.sdsefi.com/aircraft.html
http://sdsefi.com/cpi.htm


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  #84  
Old 10-24-2018, 07:43 AM
svyolo svyolo is offline
 
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Ross;
I didn't want to Hi-jack your current threads, so I resurrected this one.
I have flown piston engines, but never owned one. Now that I own one, I care a lot about how long it lasts.

I was reading an old Lycoming pub about how to operate their engines. They recommended descending with the same lean power setting you were using for cruise. This was to help reduce shock cooling.

I haven't read anything about this with EFI, but if Lyc recommends running closer to peak EGT to keep the engine warmer during the descent, do any of your users, or you, recommend the same.

Sorry, maybe it is a dumb question but I haven't read anything on EFI that states to do this, or if it is a good, or bad idea. It sure seams easy to set up, just run closer to peak EGT, either ROP, or LOP.

Thanks
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  #85  
Old 10-24-2018, 08:57 AM
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Nobody has ever mentioned doing this with our EFI. There are lots of opinions on whether you can really shock cool a Lycoming. I know we spray a couple gallons a minutes of water on the Sport Class turbo engines when they are already pretty warm and they don't grenade or seem to show any ill effect. I suspect the initial cooling rate is much higher doing this than pulling the throttle back on an RV for the descent.

If you wanted to run peak EGT in the descent, you could just turn the mixture knob a bit. Very easy.
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Ross Farnham, Calgary, Alberta
Turbo Subaru EJ22, SDS EFI, Marcotte M-300, IVO, RV6A C-GVZX flying from CYBW since 2003- 426.1 hrs. on the Hobbs,
RV10 95% built- Sold 2016
http://www.sdsefi.com/aircraft.html
http://sdsefi.com/cpi.htm


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  #86  
Old 10-24-2018, 11:35 AM
svyolo svyolo is offline
 
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OK, thanks.

That came from an old Lycoming recommendation, to keep CHT's to less than 50F per minute cooling rate.
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  #87  
Old 10-24-2018, 12:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by svyolo View Post
OK, thanks.

That came from an old Lycoming recommendation, to keep CHT's to less than 50F per minute cooling rate.
The document you saw- is it referring to "mixture" or "power" (red knob or black knob)? Putting aside the "shock cooling" controversy, I typically maintain my cruise MP in the descent. In other words, if I'm at a typical 9000 alt, WOT and 22 inches, I'll drop the nose at TOD and then pull out throttle as required to ride 22 inches all the way into the pattern. I typically don't touch the mixture until I enter the pattern (or need to add power).
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  #88  
Old 10-25-2018, 02:37 AM
svyolo svyolo is offline
 
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It referred to leaving the mixture at the same lean setting (still ROP) as you used in cruise. Start the descent by reducing power a little, but leave the mixture at the same setting you used in cruise. I will try to find it and do a cut and paste.
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  #89  
Old 10-25-2018, 03:00 AM
svyolo svyolo is offline
 
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"And finally, power-off letdowns should be avoided. This is especially applicable to cold-weather operations when shock-cooling of the cylinder heads is likely. It is recommended that cylinder head temperature change not exceed 50 ̊ F. per minute. Plan ahead, reduce power gradually and maintain some power throughout the descent. Also keep the fuel/air mixture leaned out during the descent. If an exhaust gas temperature gage is installed with a normally aspirated engine, keep it peaked to ensure the greatest possible engine heat for the power setting selected; for a turbocharged installation, lean to peak during descent unless otherwise specified in the Pilotís Operating Handbook, or under conditions where the limiting turbine inlet temperature would be mixtures that contribute to sudden cooling. It is recommended that pilots maintain at least 15" MP or higher, and set the RPM at the lowest cruise position. This should prevent ring flutter and the problems associated with it.
Letdown speed should not exceed high cruise speed or approxi- mately 1,000 feet per minute of descent. Keeping descent and airspeed within these limits will help to prevent the sudden cooling that may result in cracked cylinder heads, warped exhaust valves and bent pushrods.
The mixture setting also has an effect on engine cooling. To reduce spark plug fouling and keep the cylinder cooling within the recommended 50 ̊ per-minute limit, the mixture should be left at the lean setting used for cruise and then richened gradu- ally during descent from altitude. The lean mixture, maintaining some power and using a sensible airspeed should achieve the most efficient engine temperatures possible."

It is from a document called the "Lycoming Flyer".
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  #90  
Old 10-25-2018, 08:05 AM
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DanH DanH is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by svyolo View Post
Mounting on top of the engine, any issues with heat after shutdown? Obviously while running they are being air cooled by fresh air. After shutdown, hot air flows up hill and the coil will get very hot. 300+ degrees F.
Naaa. 200F or less in that location. Mags and similar gear bolted directly to the hot engine only max around 220.

Quote:
I was reading an old Lycoming pub about how to operate their engines. They recommended descending with the same lean power setting you were using for cruise. This was to help reduce shock cooling. I haven't read anything about this with EFI, but if Lyc recommends running closer to peak EGT to keep the engine warmer during the descent, do any of your users, or you, recommend the same.
In the context of your question, it doesn't matter what kind of injection or carb you're flying behind. And anyway, mixture is only one of the variables to maintaining temperature.

FWIW, I typically let it go very lean in descent, to save fuel, reduce combustion chamber deposits, and keep the airplane below VNE. It's a regime where the LOP HP loss is welcome. I actually set an EIS alarm at 50F per minute back in 2010. It hasn't tripped in 800+ hours.

Gotta take some of the old Lycoming recommendations with a grain of salt. You just know there were some instructors out there teaching "full rich for descent" and other crazy stuff.
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Last edited by DanH : 10-25-2018 at 08:21 AM.
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