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  #1  
Old 03-14-2018, 06:28 AM
RV8Squaz's Avatar
RV8Squaz RV8Squaz is offline
 
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Location: Senoia, Georgia
Posts: 566
Default Aresti Made Simple

For those that may have an interest in aerobatic competition, I realize that one of the things that may seem complicated is the Aresti System. The Aresti System is a system of depicting and scoring the many aerobatic figures and their multitude of variations. It’s called a system because there is method to the madness. It was designed by a Spanish Air Force Colonel, José Luis Aresti, many decades ago and it is used universally for aerobatic competitions. The files below are written for the r/c (radio-controlled aircraft) community and it is presented in a simplified method. Caution, there may be some differences from the actual Aresti catalog.

http://anti-gravite.com/fichiers/IMA...e%20Simple.pdf

http://www.nzrcaa.co.nz/wp-content/u...Dictionary.pdf


This is the Primary Known sequence for 2017 and 2018:

https://www.iac.org/system/files/Primary%202017.pdf

It’s a:

1. 45 degree up line
2. A one and a half turn spin
3. Half of a Cuban 8
4. A loop
5. A 180 degree turn
6. Am aileron roll or technically a slow roll.

If you’re already doing some aerobatics, this could be something to shoot for. If you haven’t already please get some aerobatic training before trying this at home.

I hope this inspires someone to give it a go and enjoy this sport as much as I have.
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  #2  
Old 03-14-2018, 01:30 PM
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Gash Gash is offline
 
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Location: Goodyear, Arizona
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Default

Thanks for posting this Jerry! Good luck to you as you get started with the contest season. I'm getting ready for Borrego Springs, CA in April, then it'll be one a month for the rest of the year!
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  #3  
Old 03-14-2018, 07:35 PM
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RV8Squaz RV8Squaz is offline
 
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You're welcome Gash. Wow! A contest every month! That's pretty aggressive, but that's how you get good too.

I'm getting ready for our first contest at the beginning of April, The Snowbird Classic in Dunnellon FL. I did four last year. I'm hoping for 5 or 6 this year. I say hoping because we have a lot of travel plans. Many of the contests are over the summer and I'm hardly home over the summer due to work and family vacations. It's a good problem to have!

Good luck to you too!
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  #4  
Old 03-15-2018, 10:32 AM
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ronschreck ronschreck is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Gold Hill Airpark (NC25), NC
Posts: 1,300
Default Flying the sequence - Figure #1

Primary Known 2018

Getting from an Aresti drawing of a figure to actually flying the figure perfectly is what IAC competition is all about. What may seem like a true representation of the figure from the cockpit may differ greatly from what the judges see from their vantage point on the ground. Coaching from the judges' vantage point is essential to success in competition. So let's take it one figure at a time.

But before you fly figure #1 you must enter the box. You will be holding outside the box, listening for the Chief Judge to call you: "Joe Blow, you are cleared into the box. Have a good flight." You are on a base leg at 3500' AGL and do a half roll to inverted to check the security of your seat belt(s) then roll upright, turning 90-degrees as you dive into the box. A 30-45 degree dive into the box allows you to see the box markers easily, orienting yourself in the box for your first figure and picking up speed. Three quick 45-degree wing dips to the judges signals that you are ready to commence your sequence. You level off briefly before starting figure #1. (Note: all figures start and end with a horizontal, level line.)

Figure #1 is a 45-degree up line. Each figure starts with a score of 10 and is reduced by each judge as he finds errors in your figure. Seems simple enough! The pull to the 45-degree line is a constant radius 1/8 loop which is downgraded by one point for every change in radius. The 45 degree line is not wind corrected and is graded on the path of the aircraft center of gravity.
Think of the airplane condensed into a single dot and watch the path this dot takes through the sky. This is the flight path, or track, of the aircraft’s center of gravity. Judging the flight path consists of comparing the observed path with fixed references such as the horizon or the X and Y axes of the Aerobatic Box. Aircraft attitude does not determine the 45-degree line. Actually, if the aircraft slows as it climbs the attitude will appear to increase in order to maintain the 45-degree flight path. Since the 45-degree up line is not wind corrected it will appear steep in a headwind and shallow in a tailwind. Judges recognize the wind effect and mentally disregard it when determining whether the line is a true 45 degrees. However, most experienced competition pilots will purposely fly a 45-degree up line slightly shallow into the wind and slightly steep downwind. Deviation from 45 degrees is penalized one point for every five degrees steep or shallow. The return to level flight is a pushed 1/8 loop which need not have the same radius as the pull to the 45-degree line but it must have a consistent radius to avoid penalty. The figure is complete when the aircraft returns to level flight. Deviation from level flight are penalized by one point for every five degrees off level and/or off heading.

Take a deep breath and ready yourself for figure #2.
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  #5  
Old 03-15-2018, 01:22 PM
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RV8Squaz RV8Squaz is offline
 
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A simple little line, but there is a lot that goes into it! Well said Ron.
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  #6  
Old 03-15-2018, 02:59 PM
sandifer sandifer is offline
 
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Ron, little clarification - 45 lines are graded on attitude rather than flight path. Only level lines are graded on flight path.

And the only airplanes that really appear on a 45 attitude when pitched 45 degrees from the vertical zero lift axis are those with zero incidence, symmetrical airfoils, and long thin fuselages. Technical "IAC" 45 uplines in RVs and Citabrias will appear well shallow, and pilots are definitely advised to steepen those up for the same reason Ron mentions adjusting for wind - to make it look good to those half blind judges a half mile away. There's more to the story than putting your sighting device edge on the horizon.

[IMG][/IMG]
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  #7  
Old 03-15-2018, 04:14 PM
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ronschreck ronschreck is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sandifer View Post
Ron, little clarification - 45 lines are graded on attitude rather than flight path. Only level lines are graded on flight path.
I stand corrected.
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  #8  
Old 03-15-2018, 04:17 PM
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Default Thanks for the info

Thanks for the info and please keep it coming.

I plan to use this info to give a grade to my neighbors when they are practicing. I have a nice view from my deck in the back of the house.
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  #9  
Old 03-15-2018, 08:40 PM
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ronschreck ronschreck is offline
 
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Default Flying the sequence - Figure #2

Primary Known 2018

Welcome back. It doesn't take long to get from figure #1 to figure #2, so here you are after a very short breather.

Figure #2 is a one and a half turn spin. The 45-degree up line of figure #1 is a perfect setup for the spin as you are at the top of the box (about 3500 AGL) and slowed to near stall speed. The spin must start from level flight so you reduce power to idle and keep increasing pitch to maintain level flight. A five degree descent will get you a one point penalty!

When the aircraft stalls, the aircraft must simultaneously move around all three flight axes:
(1) the nose will pitch toward the ground; (2) the nose will yaw; and (3), a wing tip will drop. Failure to achieve simultaneous motion about all three axes should be considered a “forced entry” and downgraded one point per five degrees of deviation on each axis. For example, if 10 degrees of pitch and 10 degrees of roll are observed before any motion about the yaw axis is seen, a four point deduction would be made. Note that you can spin either right or left, your choice. (It would be good to practice spins in both directions as you will need to go both ways when you get into other sequences. Imagine a 3/4 spin that you need to exit going to the left of the entry heading.) I goes without saying that over or under rotation of the spin by 10 degrees is a two point penalty. (I did say it, didn't I?)

If the aircraft never stalls, it is apparent that it cannot spin, and a hard zero (HZ) must be given. (Consider a hard zero to be just as bad as a plain old zero for now.) After completion of the one and a half turns, the aircraft must stop rotating precisely on the X axis and in the direction of flight appropriate to the sequence being flown. (To the left or downwind in the illustrated sequence.) Be alert for early stopping of the autorotation followed by “aileroning” to the required heading. In this case, a deduction of one point for every five degrees of "aileroning" must be applied. For example, in a one-turn spin the autorotation is observed to stop after 345 degrees of rotation and the ailerons are used to complete the remaining 15 degrees of rotation. The highest mark this spin could receive is a 7.0.

Following completion of the one and a half turn rotation, a vertical down line must be seen. It is acceptable for the pilot to achieve this in either of two ways: Immediately after rotation stops, the nose is pitched to the vertical down line and the wings are simultaneously brought to the level attitude; or, the vertical down line and wings-level attitude are achieved as the pilot halts the rotation, such that the prescribed number of turns, vertical down line, and wings-level attitude are all achieved simultaneously. The vertical down line may be as long as desired but must be a true vertical line or a penalty of one point for five degrees off vertical will be assessed. The pull to level flight is a ¼ loop of constant radius. The figure is complete upon reaching level flight. Again, penalties are given for deviation from level flight or proper heading.

Take another deep breath and get ready for figure #3, the half Cuban. Actually, take the weekend off and I'll get to figure #3 on Monday.
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Ron Schreck
IAC Director and National Judge
RV-8, "Miss Izzy", 2100+ RV Hours
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  #10  
Old 03-15-2018, 09:54 PM
eddieseve eddieseve is offline
 
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I'm going out to practice this weekend, you have me inspired, although I might not be able to wait till Monday to do the half cuban and the loop

Cheers
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Last edited by eddieseve : 03-15-2018 at 09:56 PM.
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