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  #1  
Old 03-13-2018, 09:25 AM
rocketman1988 rocketman1988 is offline
 
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Location: Sunman, IN
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Default Aerosport Rudder Trim

For those out there flying with the Aerosport rudder trim, i have a question:

How much does the adjustment knob rotate during an average flight? Is it more or less than one full term of the knob?

Thanks!
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  #2  
Old 03-13-2018, 10:03 AM
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rleffler rleffler is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rocketman1988 View Post
For those out there flying with the Aerosport rudder trim, i have a question:

How much does the adjustment knob rotate during an average flight? Is it more or less than one full term of the knob?

Thanks!
None.

I've got mine set for my standard cruise configuration. I just override it for take off and landing. Every once in awhile, I'll have to make a slight tweak.
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  #3  
Old 03-13-2018, 10:37 AM
rocketman1988 rocketman1988 is offline
 
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Default Clarification

Bob

When you "override" it for takeoff and landing, how much rotation of the knob do you generally use? Is it like a 1/4 turn or more?
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Bob
Aerospace Engineer '88

RV-10
Structure - 90% Done
Cabin Top - Aaarrghhh...
Doors - Done
On Gear
290 HP Barrett Hung
ShowPlanes Cowl with Skybolts Fitted - Beautiful

Dues Paid 2017,...Thanks DR+
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  #4  
Old 03-13-2018, 01:17 PM
BobTurner BobTurner is offline
 
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Default

I think he meant that he uses his foot.
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  #5  
Old 03-13-2018, 01:25 PM
woxofswa woxofswa is offline
 
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Location: Mesa Arizona
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Default

I had the Blue Skunk one but it is the same science as the Aerosport one
In my opinion, having one is better than not, but having one of either the Dynon or Garmin yaw damper systems which makes the rudder trim obsolete is much better still.

It is amazing how balancing the load from side to side affects the in flight trim. On a few occasions Iíve flown with just one rear pax and which side they sit on makes a difference. Fuel balance obviously makes a difference as well.
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  #6  
Old 03-13-2018, 01:29 PM
BobTurner BobTurner is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woxofswa View Post
I had the Blue Skunk one but it is the same science as the Aerosport one
In my opinion, having one is better than not, but having one of either the Dynon or Garmin yaw damper systems which makes the rudder trim obsolete is much better still.

It is amazing how balancing the load from side to side affects the in flight trim. On a few occasions Iíve flown with just one rear pax and which side they sit on makes a difference. Fuel balance obviously makes a difference as well.
Iím confused. Side to side loads should be balanced by aileron trim, not rudder trim. I have a fixed trim wedge on the rudder and no desire for anything more than that in yaw. I do wish that I had installed aileron trim, though.
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  #7  
Old 03-13-2018, 02:37 PM
rocketman1988 rocketman1988 is offline
 
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Default But

Per the garmin manual, the yaw damper is NOT a replacement for actual rudder trim...
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Aerospace Engineer '88

RV-10
Structure - 90% Done
Cabin Top - Aaarrghhh...
Doors - Done
On Gear
290 HP Barrett Hung
ShowPlanes Cowl with Skybolts Fitted - Beautiful

Dues Paid 2017,...Thanks DR+
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  #8  
Old 03-13-2018, 04:34 PM
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rleffler rleffler is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BobTurner View Post
I think he meant that he uses his foot.
That would be correct.........
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  #9  
Old 03-13-2018, 05:05 PM
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GaryK GaryK is offline
 
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Bob,
In cruise my 10 had the right portion of the ball slightly over the right line. I rested my foot on the right rudder peddle with a little force in cruise. I didnít want to add the trim tab and the Aerosport rudder trim didnít fit with my setup. Added the Dynon Yaw Damper. I can tell you it keeps the ball centered. If the ball was way out the results may have been different. Iíve played with the settings and the torque is set lower than my pitch trim. Maybe not recommended but it works fine in my situation.

Gary
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  #10  
Old 03-13-2018, 09:44 PM
woxofswa woxofswa is offline
 
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The two axis, roll and yaw, are interrelated. Bank a normal airplane and it will also change heading. Depress a rudder pedal and it will also induce roll/bank.
The roll axis of the autopilot focuses on its assignment, either to keep the wings level, an assigned bank, or most common, maintain a selected track, heading, or course (Nav). Every time the roll servo makes a correction to accomplish its assigned task, there is inherently a change in yaw as well.
The yaw damper is different. It’s primary goal is keeping the rudder ball centered (that is how it is calibrated). It’s secondary mission is to dampen externally induced oscillations.
The two work in concert for a primary goal of “driving” the aircraft where you want it to go, and secondarily, keeping the aircraft as aerodynamically straight as possible for efficiency. An “action” by one axis will result in a corresponding “reaction” by the other. An external application of force, like an imbalanced load, affects the actions of both.
To really get into the weeds, an aircraft with centerline thrust should do fine with a yaw damper without the need for rudder trim. Assuming of course, that the airframe naturally flies relatively straight. An aircraft with the possibility of high asymmetric thrust (engine loss in a twin) usually will have both merely because of the mechanical advantage difference between the two.
Rudder trim is strong but “dumb” Yaw dampers are “smart”. Pitch trim can be dumb or smart. I have never flown an airplane that had smart roll trim. The Boeing doesn’t. Just like my RV10, the roll trim in the Boeing is strictly mechanical to offset external strain on the roll servo.
Back to the OP. I removed the dumb rudder trim from my airplane when I installed the smart yaw damper system and don’t miss it at all. The airplane rides better and flies straighter in all modes. There is obviously nothing wrong with having both rudder trim and YD. It’s just overkill IMO is a straight flying single. If I ever built a twin, I would definitely have both.
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First flight May 10, 2014

Last edited by woxofswa : 03-13-2018 at 09:59 PM.
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