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  #21  
Old 10-04-2017, 08:00 PM
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Mel Mel is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlanTN View Post
Is that really true? So if someone has been away for 50 years they need 50 hours of dual? They would be better off starting over if that is the case.
No that is NOT true. That's an estimate someone came up with.
There is no flight review time requirement based on being "away from flying".
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  #22  
Old 10-04-2017, 09:21 PM
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I never said it was a requirement Mel, just that the FAA says that (not just "someone"). In fact if you care to read the FAA publication called "Conducting an Effective Flight Review", you will find my quoted statement below:
"For pilots who have not flown at all for several years, a useful "rule of thumb" is to plan one hour of ground training and one hour of flight training for every year the pilot has been out of the cockpit". Works just fine for an instructor who is wanting to get paid to build some time, after all he is just following the FAA guidelines.
I thought it odd as well, since I soloed in 8 hours, now it takes me 50 hours to gain that same status.

QUOTE=Mel;1208670]No that is NOT true. That's an estimate someone came up with.
There is no flight review time requirement based on being "away from flying".[/quote]
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  #23  
Old 10-04-2017, 09:35 PM
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I have double checked this with the FAA. Not only am I a Sport Pilot now,
the other requirement they brought up was their requirement "However a pilot may NOT take a flight review in an aircraft for which he or she does not hold a rating or operating privilege", and their statement "For example, a sport pilot who holds airplane privileges could not take the flight review in a Cessna 172 since that airplane is not a light sport airplane and he or she does not hold operating privileges for that airplane." Obviously I could never hold operating privilege for a non-LSA craft.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobTurner View Post
Don, if I understand correctly, you are not a sport pilot; you are a private pilot exercising sport privileges. As such you may do a flight review in a 172, etc. No medical needed since the cfi will have to be PIC (since your Flight Review has expired). May not be ideal, but is a possibility.
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  #24  
Old 10-04-2017, 09:50 PM
rv7charlie rv7charlie is offline
 
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Why are you a sport pilot *now*? If you're really a private pilot, did was your last physical expire? If <10 years ago, just do the new alternative 3rd class medical thing. Then take your flight review in, whatever. Private pilots can fly light sport a/c, right?

Oh, and surely you can find a flight instructor who isn't an extortionist.
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  #25  
Old 10-04-2017, 09:54 PM
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Wish I could have qualified. Last medical was 25 years ago as well.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rv7charlie View Post
Why are you a sport pilot *now*? If you're really a private pilot, did was your last physical expire? If <10 years ago, just do the new alternative 3rd class medical thing. Then take your flight review in, whatever. Private pilots can fly light sport a/c, right?

Oh, and surely you can find a flight instructor who isn't an extortionist.
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  #26  
Old 10-04-2017, 10:19 PM
BobTurner BobTurner is offline
 
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Don, LOOK AT YOUR LICENSE! Does it say 'Sport Pilot"? 25 years ago that didn't exist. I'll bet it says 'Private Pilot'. You do not need a medical to get a flight review, since you cannot be PIC (since you lack a Flight Review). If you want to get dual or a flight Review in a 172, all you need is your private pilot license. The cfi will need to act as PIC.
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  #27  
Old 10-05-2017, 03:50 AM
mturnerb mturnerb is offline
 
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When I started back flying (under sport pilot privileges - no current medical) I ordered a new airman certificate (removed SSN from it) which showed the same ratings (Private Pilot, Instrument Rating) with no restrictions on the certificate itself.

Regarding the time needed to get back - I was concerned about how much dual I would need but the first landing I made in that 172 was one of the best I'd ever made. I did do some serious ground self-training on new airspace rules, etc - I actually bought a review course from King School and went through that several times.

My point is that you should be able to exercise sport pilot privileges with a BFR in your logbook with no restrictions other than those placed by your insurance company.
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  #28  
Old 10-05-2017, 06:35 AM
BigJohn BigJohn is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DonFromTX View Post
I have double checked this with the FAA. Not only am I a Sport Pilot now,
the other requirement they brought up was their requirement "However a pilot may NOT take a flight review in an aircraft for which he or she does not hold a rating or operating privilege", and their statement "For example, a sport pilot who holds airplane privileges could not take the flight review in a Cessna 172 since that airplane is not a light sport airplane and he or she does not hold operating privileges for that airplane." Obviously I could never hold operating privilege for a non-LSA craft.
Don, look yourself up on the FAA registry website. You are a Private Pilot in the records of the FAA. Whoever you talked to at the FAA either is wrong, or you misunderstood them. Go to any flight school that uses older aircraft for instruction, preferably something you flew years ago, and get a flight review. No solo time, just a flight review. If you can pass that then find a CFI who will give you transition training in the stock RV-12 you bought. Since you will already have a current flight review you only have to satisfy yourself and the CFI that you are at a safe level of currency, and satisfy the insurance company.

Then get yourself a bunch of hours in the 12 you bought flying to get very comfortable in the type before putting yourself in the test pilot mode to fly the airplane you built with many departures from the original Vans design.

One step at a time!
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  #29  
Old 10-05-2017, 02:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlanTN View Post
Is that really true? So if someone has been away for 50 years they need 50 hours of dual? They would be better off starting over if that is the case.
This is NOT true.
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  #30  
Old 10-05-2017, 02:12 PM
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RVbySDI RVbySDI is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DonFromTX View Post
Wish I could have qualified. Last medical was 25 years ago as well.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobTurner View Post
Don, LOOK AT YOUR LICENSE! Does it say 'Sport Pilot"? 25 years ago that didn't exist. I'll bet it says 'Private Pilot'. You do not need a medical to get a flight review, since you cannot be PIC (since you lack a Flight Review). If you want to get dual or a flight Review in a 172, all you need is your private pilot license. The cfi will need to act as PIC.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mturnerb View Post
When I started back flying (under sport pilot privileges - no current medical) I ordered a new airman certificate (removed SSN from it) which showed the same ratings (Private Pilot, Instrument Rating) with no restrictions on the certificate itself.

Regarding the time needed to get back - I was concerned about how much dual I would need but the first landing I made in that 172 was one of the best I'd ever made. I did do some serious ground self-training on new airspace rules, etc - I actually bought a review course from King School and went through that several times.

My point is that you should be able to exercise sport pilot privileges with a BFR in your logbook with no restrictions other than those placed by your insurance company.
Don, Listen to these guys! They are telling you like it is. First point is your license. If you had a Private Pilot license 25 years ago, you have a Private Pilot license today. They do not expire. So, go get a BFR and renew your medical or go the BasicMed route for a medical. Then you can get training in any airplane a flight school may have for you to fly. Then work out how you can get specific training in the RV12.

Look at the replies from perfect strangers around the country who have replied to your threads you have posted. There are ways to do it and people around willing to help you do it. So take that old NIKE slogan to heart -- JUST DO IT!
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Last edited by RVbySDI : 10-05-2017 at 02:14 PM.
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