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  #1  
Old 10-03-2017, 05:56 AM
Fast Eddie B Fast Eddie B is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Mineral Bluff, GA
Posts: 41
Default RV12 Landing Tips/Tricks/Gotchas?

I’m a CFI, and I have a BFR scheduled with a fellow EAA member is an RV12 he built himself.

I have zero time in an RV12. But it doesn’t seem radically different from, let’s say, the Grummans I’ve owned and instructed in.

I have always taught that, conditions permitting, landings should be with full flaps and and the lowest possible airspeed. That coincides with the Private Pilot standards that call for an applicant to demonstrate landings a “approximately stall speed”. For most days in most planes, that still remains my goal - land with minimum energy.

Is there anything quirky or odd about the RV12 that could bite me? I don’t think I’ve ever flown a plane with flaperons, but I would presume if properly designed they should have about the same feel as independent flaps and ailerons.

As an aside, a factory built RV12 would be on my short list if I ever decided to replace my Sky Arrow, though no plans to do so anytime soon.

Finally, is there anyone in the N GA, E TN or W NC area with an RV12 that might be willing to fly with me and demonstrate proper technique? I’d be more than happy to share costs, or pay for instruction, as the case may be.

Thanks in advance!

Last edited by Fast Eddie B : 10-03-2017 at 06:03 AM.
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  #2  
Old 10-03-2017, 08:21 AM
Mich48041 Mich48041 is offline
 
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Location: Riley TWP MI
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The RV-12 has low drag, even with flaps deployed. It will float a long way down the runway unless airspeed is properly managed.
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  #3  
Old 10-03-2017, 08:40 AM
rvbuilder2002 rvbuilder2002 is offline
 
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Location: Hubbard Oregon
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At moderate weights, if the airspeed is faster than about 50 Kts, transitioning into the round out to flair, it will be a long landing.

The idle speed of the engine can have an influence / effecting on the landing.
Idle with engine at full operating temp should be no higher than 1650 RPM when throttle is pulled all the way back (but work to keep idle above 1800 RPM for all normal ground operations).

The only influence the flapperons have that makes the airplane different is that they are less self centering than airplanes with traditional ailerons when the flaps are fully deployed. Some RV-12's have a change in roll trim when flaps are deployed because of minor alignment/rigging errors in the control system.

As already mentioned (and as is the case with most airplanes) proper airspeed control is the key.
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  #4  
Old 10-03-2017, 09:00 AM
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Phantom30 Phantom30 is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Coeur d'Alene, ID/Casa Grande, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fast Eddie B View Post
Iím a CFI, and I have a BFR scheduled with a fellow EAA member is an RV12 he built himself.

I have zero time in an RV12. But it doesnít seem radically different from, letís say, the Grummans Iíve owned and instructed in.

I have always taught that, conditions permitting, landings should be with full flaps and and the lowest possible airspeed. That coincides with the Private Pilot standards that call for an applicant to demonstrate landings a ďapproximately stall speedĒ. For most days in most planes, that still remains my goal - land with minimum energy.

Is there anything quirky or odd about the RV12 that could bite me? I donít think Iíve ever flown a plane with flaperons, but I would presume if properly designed they should have about the same feel as independent flaps and ailerons.

As an aside, a factory built RV12 would be on my short list if I ever decided to replace my Sky Arrow, though no plans to do so anytime soon.

Finally, is there anyone in the N GA, E TN or W NC area with an RV12 that might be willing to fly with me and demonstrate proper technique? Iíd be more than happy to share costs, or pay for instruction, as the case may be.

Thanks in advance!
I understand the purpose of being able to demonstrate a near full stall landing; but this old aviator has found that landing with the first notch of flapperon and use the two step landing technic, stabilized @ 60 knots, roll out with a little power @ around 5 feet off the deck, check gust/cross wind or coyote on runway; then pull power. She will settle ever so gently on mains keeping nose gear off till stabilizer looses any authority is the way to go.

The RV-12 "is not a Cessna or a Piper"; the landing gear should be treated gently.. that said; it is a little more slippery, but handles like a dream with stalls being a non-event.

Landing with full flapperon @ near full stall (everything happens right at the landing flare pretty fast) which I found results in some harder pounding on the landing gear...or maybe it's just me😱
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  #5  
Old 10-03-2017, 09:20 AM
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Carl Froehlich Carl Froehlich is offline
 
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Location: Dogwood Airpark (VA42)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phantom30 View Post
SNIP

Landing with full flapperon @ near full stall (everything happens right at the landing flare pretty fast) which I found results in some harder pounding on the landing gear...or maybe it's just me😱
+1. If there is runway available don't train to have the plane fall out of the sky. Strive for that elusive "are we still flying or did we land" smooth evolution.

Carl
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  #6  
Old 10-03-2017, 09:22 AM
RV12JT RV12JT is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Keystone State
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Eddie, it flys just like the Tiger, only better. Lighter feel to the controls and of course, it's a lighter A/C. You should not have any issues.
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  #7  
Old 10-03-2017, 09:32 AM
DHeal DHeal is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Windsor, California
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I find it desirable to "fly the nose wheel down to the ground" following touch-down on the mains. If you hold the stabilator full aft throughout the roll-out, the nose wheel has a tendency to plop down somewhat unceremoniously as ground speed and stabilator effectiveness diminish. I like to touch down on the mains, let the ground speed diminish somewhat, and then gently lower the nose wheel to the ground while there is still some stabilator effectiveness. Of course in gusty crossswind conditions, it may be advantageous to lower the nose wheel more quickly so as to reduce the wing's angle-of-attack.
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  #8  
Old 10-03-2017, 09:33 AM
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DaleB DaleB is offline
 
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Location: Omaha, NE (KMLE)
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I will say, my landings improved tremendously when I slowed down to the proper landing speed with full flaps. I don't try for a "flare" so much as just managing the speed and sink rate - I try to not let the plane land, and fail gracefully. That puts me gently on the runway in the proper attitude (tail low, nosewheel off).

The only time I don't use full flaps is if there's a particularly problematic gusting crosswind. I'm still a very low time pilot (under 200 hours), so I'm sure that will get better with experience too.
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  #9  
Old 10-03-2017, 02:52 PM
scottmillhouse scottmillhouse is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Madison, AL
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The plane is slippery so you will float as Scott says if speed is up. With full flaps, I stabilize at 55 in final- dead stick with a fairly high sink rate, enter flare at about 50 and touch down mid 40s with angle of attack and stall singing if I hit it right. Hold nose up to about 35 and let down slowly otherwise it will drop when the tail quits flying. Heavy, gusty and cross winds 1/2 flaps use 60 and a little power until flare and try to plant it with the nose down ASAP to quit flying.
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  #10  
Old 10-03-2017, 09:48 PM
RFSchaller RFSchaller is offline
 
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Location: Phoenix, AZ
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I agree with the folks who talked about low drag. That was the biggest surprise coming from a Cherokee. There is also a distinct pitch change down when the flaps are applied (opposite from what my Cherokee does) and the flaps donít act as air brakes like on the Cherokee. If you are fast pull the power off. Small power reductions donít slow the plane down expeditiously.
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