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  #21  
Old 09-20-2017, 11:31 AM
az_gila's Avatar
az_gila az_gila is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: 57AZ - NW Tucson area
Posts: 8,732
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Quote:
Originally Posted by acroflyrgirl View Post
We also flew from CXP (air races) Monday, home to Tucson. Made it all the way to HII (2 hrs) before stopping for "lunch".
I have those pittle packs in my plane but admit I'm skered to try them. My guess is that you menfolk have much better odds of hitting the target, so to speak.

Cathy
Maybe, but it is very tricky in the recumbent seat of a sailplane...
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Gil Alexander
EAA Technical Counselor, Airframe Mechanic
Half completed RV-10 QB purchased
RV-6A N61GX - finally flying
Grumman Tiger N12GA - flying
La Cholla Airpark (57AZ) Tucson AZ
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  #22  
Old 09-20-2017, 02:32 PM
pvalovich pvalovich is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Ridgecrest, CA
Posts: 372
Default Gatorade Bottles

The most important tool in the cockpit for 4+ hr. flights by us 70+ year olds.

The A-7 was the first plane I flew that had a pee tube - a cone with the opening about 4 inches wide. The LTV tech rep told us it was sized for the "average" guy. A lot of panicked looks in the ready room until he allowed as how he was joking.
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  #23  
Old 09-20-2017, 02:39 PM
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az_gila az_gila is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: 57AZ - NW Tucson area
Posts: 8,732
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvalovich View Post
The most important tool in the cockpit for 4+ hr. flights by us 70+ year olds.

The A-7 was the first plane I flew that had a pee tube - a cone with the opening about 4 inches wide. The LTV tech rep told us it was sized for the "average" guy. A lot of panicked looks in the ready room until he allowed as how he was joking.
And some European sailplanes came equipped with a fitting on the end of a rubber tube.

Colloquially referred to as "Polish Microphones"
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Gil Alexander
EAA Technical Counselor, Airframe Mechanic
Half completed RV-10 QB purchased
RV-6A N61GX - finally flying
Grumman Tiger N12GA - flying
La Cholla Airpark (57AZ) Tucson AZ
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  #24  
Old 09-20-2017, 03:00 PM
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airguy airguy is online now
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Garden City, Tx
Posts: 3,822
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvalovich View Post
The A-7 was the first plane I flew that had a pee tube - a cone with the opening about 4 inches wide. The LTV tech rep told us it was sized for the "average" guy. A lot of panicked looks in the ready room until he allowed as how he was joking.
Those can be problematic when flying in freezing weather. Coming back from Reno I never saw temps above 24F at altitude. In winter that can be down near the deck.

I've started planning my next two flight envelope expansion trips, from Midland to El Paso to Tucson to Pheonix to Show Low to Albuquerque and back down through Roswell and Hobbs into Midland again, making the big circle around the MOA's. 1100nm but no constant tailwind, I should be able to do that in 7.5 hours at normal cruise, and since I'm becoming quite comfortable with the fuel burn and consistency of the airplane, I can pull it back thirty knots to 120 KTAS and make the same trip in 9.5 hours next time around. I like flying out west because the weather is almost always good in the dry desert.
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Built an off-plan 9A with too much fuel and too much HP. Should drop dead any minute now.

Last edited by airguy : 09-20-2017 at 03:19 PM.
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  #25  
Old 09-20-2017, 05:09 PM
jrs14855 jrs14855 is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Lake Havasu City AZ
Posts: 1,990
Default Distance

998 nm nonstop in the Wittman Tailwind in 6.1 hours. 75% power, significant headwind first 2/3, tailwind last 1/3. Pecos TX to Watertown WI.
St. Johns, Newfoundland to Shannon Ireland flight plans 10 hours. I may someday work up the courage to do that. The big hurdle is the HF radio. In my opinion a completely worthless piece of equipment but the rules require it.
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  #26  
Old 09-20-2017, 05:19 PM
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snopercod snopercod is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Asheville, NC
Posts: 804
Default Depends

Quote:
Originally Posted by humptybump View Post
I always have a TravelJohn packed in the cockpit
I tried one of those once, at 12,500' over the Utah desert. Whether the problem was my highly-reclined seat, the proximity of the stick, or the shortness of my little soldier, I can't say, but the TravelJohn didn't work at all. In desperation I shoved a wad of paper towels down my pants and that didn't work, either. As Alan Shepherd once said (in the movie), "I'm a wetback now".

Two hours later, after landing and changing clothes, I immediately took a taxi to the nearest supermarket and bought some Depends. I'm not ashamed to report that I wear Depends now on any flight longer than one hour. It's an old age thing. FWIW, I've never had to use them since, but they take a load off my mind.
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  #27  
Old 09-20-2017, 06:01 PM
Mr Grinch Mr Grinch is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Land of the Free (Texas)
Posts: 32
Default

We used "Piddle Packs", a back with an absorbent sponge and long, securable neck.

Pretty challenging to "find yourself" under all of that gear, and keep it all in place. Sometimes it helped to fly upside down.

As far as I know, the company went out of business.
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  #28  
Old 09-20-2017, 07:22 PM
Timberwolf Timberwolf is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Navarre, FL
Posts: 121
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Grinch View Post
We used "Piddle Packs", a back with an absorbent sponge and long, securable neck.

Pretty challenging to "find yourself" under all of that gear, and keep it all in place. Sometimes it helped to fly upside down.

As far as I know, the company went out of business.
Not sure where you sourced yours but I use piddle packs everyday in my day job. Ours are made by abilityone www.alphapointe.org

It's a company that employs blind people. Not sure if you can buy them in the civilian sector but they are $8 a piece for Uncle Sam. Expensive but well worth it. I haven't seen the sponges around for about 5 years. They are all the powder variety and they work awesome.
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  #29  
Old 09-20-2017, 09:11 PM
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RV8iator RV8iator is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Dahlonega, GA
Posts: 1,344
Default Interesting flights

Two interesting legs
Ft Pierce, Fl. to Santo Domongo, DR. One stop, and
Brownsville, Tx. nonstop to Acapulco, Mexico.

And a few nonstop Austin, Tx to 9A0. Dahlonega, Ga. 735nm.
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Dahlonega, GA. 9A0
PIF 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011,2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017.

I just wish I could afford to live the way I do
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  #30  
Old 09-21-2017, 07:16 AM
Robert Anglin Robert Anglin is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: houston, texas
Posts: 701
Default Fuel, water, waist.

We put our little 8 together with economy in mind. I find that most people get in to big a hurry on long flights. That's OK, they want to get there fast, but the time it takes to stop and refuel along a long rout will most of the time add up to close to the same as if you just took it easy. We take off with full throttle, then at 6-7 hundred feet start to level-up and pull back power to 50-60%, then set up at 200-300'/min. climb and continue to pull power out slowly to get down to around 41-44%. This gives us a fuel burn of around 5.1-5.6 Gph. and a ground speed (no wind of around 115-120 Kts. I find that we can stay in the air at around 8,000-9,000' for 6.5 hours with 30-40 minutes of fuel left. We proofed this out again on a return from OSKH this year, a 686 Nm. leg.
I did not get to do it none stop as planed because of weather about 150 miles from home but the fuel totals show that we would have done it with about 10 gallons left in the tank. We run a light strait clean airplane, with some drag for all the outside antennas. ECI IO-360-their fuel injection and throttle body, Prince- P tip carbon prop- 68X81", air frame 1008 Lbs. with all Garmin panel.
We had thought about adding aux. tanks in the wings, and if we ever did do the rounder thing, we may. But for now at my stage of the game 6.5-7.0 hour legs are more than enough. We put a water bottle holder in big enough to take a bike style water bottle, one like you see on road bikes. And yes we keep a Jilly-John at the ready. Two hints we know now. Never pass up a bathroom just before you board and Pampers are not just for old folks. Ask anyone who has gone in to space. Just a thought or two. Yours, R.E.A. III #80888

Last edited by Robert Anglin : 09-21-2017 at 05:15 PM.
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