VansAirForceForums  
Home > VansAirForceForums

- POSTING RULES
- Donate yearly (please).
- Advertise in here!

- Today's Posts | Insert Pics

  #1  
Old 06-26-2019, 02:27 PM
shimuneka shimuneka is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Enterprise, AL
Posts: 32
Default Getting ready for a -12

Looking to get started on a -12 in the next few months. I was wondering is the kit really as simple and straight forward as I have been reading? What kind of preparation tips do you guys have as far as the shop goes? Will the “standard” EAA table be sufficient.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 06-26-2019, 08:16 PM
Allan Stern Allan Stern is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Cape Coral, Florida
Posts: 216
Default Building a 12

I would build yourself at least two EAA tables as a minimum. You will need at least two for the wings. Having three would be best to put your tail section on or fuselage while working on wings. You can never have enough tables. I presently have five work benches in my hanger and they all have stuff on them.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-26-2019, 08:33 PM
David Paule David Paule is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 3,931
Default

This is a somewhat easier work bench to make than the EAA one.

Dave
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06-26-2019, 09:26 PM
RFSchaller RFSchaller is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 2,509
Default

My layout table is made from two 4’ X 8’ X 3/4” sheets of plywood butted up against each other on the short edge and screwed to a 2” X 4” frame with several 4’ crosspieces to prevent sagging in the middle. The legs are six 2 X 4’s with lag bolts screwed into the ends so I can level the table. I wired 4 outlets mounted on the side frames so I’m never more than 4 feet from an outlet. I found it is useful to cut a 3” diameter hole near the end to sweep away debris or for drilling a part without putting another. It’s the veteran of three builds and has served me well.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-27-2019, 12:00 AM
rgmwa rgmwa is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Posts: 1,630
Default

A door makes a flat and cheap tabletop.
__________________
rgmwa
RV-12LR 912ULS
120346
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-27-2019, 04:50 AM
Mitch757 Mitch757 is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Falmouth, MA
Posts: 293
Default

I just used the boxes the plane came in. 4 x 4 legs and a few 2 x 2’s under the surface to strengthen it. Worked well.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-27-2019, 07:52 AM
John-G John-G is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Northeast Ohio
Posts: 589
Default

Shimuneka,

My RV-12 build was the second airplane I was involved with building. During the first build, it quickly became apparent having wheels on all the work benches, tables and parts racks is very beneficial.

If you are like most of us, the build will likely begin in a garage or basement and you will find yourself needing to rearrange the shop multiple times during various phases of the build. Having everything on wheels (preferably locking) makes this chore a piece of cake.

Also, depending on your age and condition of your back, you may want to consider making one or two workbenches lower than typical. I did not want to be standing and leaning over the work for extended periods of time ... so I purposely made two work benches that are low enough I can sit on a rolling mechanics chair while doing the majority of the measuring, drilling, deburring, countersinking, and riveting. My third work bench is of a standard height for a vise and all the power tools ... small band saw, small drill press, grinder, and ScotchBrite wheel station (which is used a lot).

For visual assistance during the build, there are a ton of photos on my blog for reference.

Happy building,
__________________
John
www.dogaviation.com
RV-12 Wings, Empennage, Fuselage, Finishing, Avionics and Powerplant kits all completed
Now Flying!!

Dues paid until September 2020

Last edited by John-G : 06-27-2019 at 08:02 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 06-27-2019, 12:06 PM
Driftdown Driftdown is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Clearwater, Florida
Posts: 366
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by John-G View Post
My RV-12 build was the second airplane I was involved with building. During the first build, it quickly became apparent having wheels on all the work benches, tables and parts racks is very beneficial.

If you are like most of us, the build will likely begin in a garage or basement and you will find yourself needing to rearrange the shop multiple times during various phases of the build. Having everything on wheels (preferably locking) makes this chore a piece of cake.

Also, depending on your age and condition of your back, you may want to consider making one or two workbenches lower than typical. I did not want to be standing and leaning over the work for extended periods of time ... so I purposely made two work benches that are low enough I can sit on a rolling mechanics chair while doing the majority of the measuring, drilling, deburring, countersinking, and riveting. My third work bench is of a standard height for a vise and all the power tools ... small band saw, small drill press, grinder, and ScotchBrite wheel station (which is used a lot).

For visual assistance during the build, there are a ton of photos on my blog for reference.
Great advice, John.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07-01-2019, 12:16 PM
shimuneka shimuneka is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Enterprise, AL
Posts: 32
Default Thanks

I appreciate the advice. One of the most important reasons I have decided to go with a Vans is the number of people that have come before me that are willing to pass the experience along.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 07-06-2019, 11:20 PM
psalys psalys is offline
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Eugene
Posts: 26
Default It's hard but doable

I just finished my RV-12iS and flew it a week ago. It took me two years. There is so much to learn in building an airplane. Here are a few things off the top of my head.

1. Order your kits well in advance of when you need them. I had about 7 months of delays waiting for Van's to send kits, 4 months just for the avoinics kit.

2. You will never regret spending money on tools that make the job easier. I was getting tendonitis with the $150 blind rivet gun from Cleaveland (a great company, BTW) so I upgraded to the $450 Pop Rivet brand gun (a professional tool). I only wish I had started with it. I wish I had bought a drill press if only to drill the steel flapperon counterbalance tubes. Very difficult to do with a hand drill. Buy lots of drill bits, they are cheap. If you think your bit might be dull, replace it. You will buying more tools and supplies throughout the project. It's never ending.

3. A right angle drill attachment would be helpful but costs $188 including bits. I used a die grinder with a #30 bit.

4. Scotchbrite Wheel on a grinder: Super useful. I wouldn't do without it

5. Part prep takes quite a bit of time and it is an acquired skill. You'll get very good at at. Prep the entire kit before you start assembling. At the end of the build when you're only doing wiring, screws and bolts you'll miss drilling, deburring and riveting aluminum. It will seem like a simpler time.

6. Priming. Oh dear. I went back and forth on this. I live in a non-humid area so I felt priming thin alclad was optional. I still ended up priming most things with Sherwin Williams P60 G2. I felt like my reason to not prime was because it was a lot of work. My reason to prime is that most professional builders prime. It's a tough decision and people will debate it forever.

7. For tables I bought 2 adjustable height, 6 foot tables from Home Depot (on-line only). That's what Synergy Air used and I liked them a lot.

8. Building an airplane is an exercise in problem solving. I got frustrated on a regular basis. Build the plane for the enjoyment of building a plane rather than to have a plane. If you want to have a plane, go on barnstormers.com and buy one. You'll actually save time and money. But if you want to build a plane, embrace the project. So many times I thought my current problem was unsolvable and yet soon it would be completely solved. Problems will arise. Some your fault, some Van's, some faulty parts from a third party. Everything is solvable.

Good luck and ask for help.

Patrick
__________________
RV-12iS complete and flying
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:04 AM.


The VAFForums come to you courtesy Delta Romeo, LLC. By viewing and participating in them you agree to build your plane using standardized methods and practices and to fly it safely and in accordance with the laws governing the country you are located in.