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  #41  
Old 11-06-2016, 07:49 PM
wirejock's Avatar
wirejock wirejock is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Estes Park, CO
Posts: 2,979
Default Right angle attachment

Do you have one of these?
I use it to drill in close quarters. First with #40. Center punch is your friend.
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Larry Larson
Estes Park, CO
http://wirejockrv7a.blogspot.com
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Donated 12/01/2017. Plus a little extra.
RV-7A #73391, N511RV reserved (1,800+ hours)
HS SB, empennage, tanks, wings, fuse, working finishing kit
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I cannot be, nor will I be, held responsible if you try to do the same things I do and it does not work and/or causes you loss, injury, or even death in the process.
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  #42  
Old 11-06-2016, 07:59 PM
amaris amaris is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Santa Ynez, CA
Posts: 130
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wirejock View Post
Do you have one of these?
I use it to drill in close quarters. First with #40. Center punch is your friend.
Hi Larry,
Yes, pretty similar.

http://www.cleavelandtool.com/90-DEG.../#.WB_sqNyELA8

The diameter of the angle hits against the rib so it forces the bit at an angle. I tried the long bit and the shorty bit but neither gets in there.
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Santa Ynez, CA
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  #43  
Old 11-06-2016, 08:28 PM
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fl-mike fl-mike is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amaris View Post
I'm starting SB-14 and just need to drill out the 8 rivets on the flange connecting to the spar. I can't get a drill in there and the angle drill still hits the rib which won't allow me to drill straight down into the rivet.

Thanks for the help!
I use a 12" 1/16" bit to pilot drill the head, then move up in sizes. You can flex the bit with your fingers (although I made a brass guide) enough to clear the drill motor and chuck.
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  #44  
Old 11-07-2016, 10:35 AM
amaris amaris is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Santa Ynez, CA
Posts: 130
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fl-mike View Post
I use a 12" 1/16" bit to pilot drill the head, then move up in sizes. You can flex the bit with your fingers (although I made a brass guide) enough to clear the drill motor and chuck.
Thanks, Mike!
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  #45  
Old 04-02-2017, 08:56 PM
TomRV8 TomRV8 is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 79
Default Rivet remover 'tool'

This works well with rivets needing to be removed close to an edge. I had the swivel head on one of my 1" clamps disappear. I rarely throw anything away, and finally came up with a good use for the dismembered clamp.

I sharpened the end of the screw in shaft. As the pics below show, I used a 1/4" drive 3/16" socket as the backing and receptacle for the shop end of the rivet to be drilled out.

Use the good advice in this thread to drill and remove the manufactured head of the rivet to be removed.

Then simply place the socket over the shop head of the rivet and screw the clamp shaft into the rivet. Works quite easily.

I used it for a while with the socket loose, and manually lined it up with the clamp. I finally broke down and used JB Weld to permanently attach the socket (which I cut shorter for a little more room between the jaws of the clamp)

I also recently discovered that when drilling the manufactured head off the rivet, and part of the head pry's up but not quite all of it, instead of drilling more, I place the tool over it and when screwing down it pops the manufactured head off at the same time as poking the shop head into the socket.







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  #46  
Old 04-09-2017, 12:43 PM
smithflys23 smithflys23 is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Jupiter
Posts: 62
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Does anyone have a source for the original posters drill bits? I cant find a Jobber bit in 3/32, or #40 with the 60 degree point. Any help is appreciated!
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  #47  
Old 04-09-2017, 04:32 PM
BillL BillL is online now
 
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Location: Central IL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smithflys23 View Post
Does anyone have a source for the original posters drill bits? I cant find a Jobber bit in 3/32, or #40 with the 60 degree point. Any help is appreciated!
Actually, the OP just used standard drill bits.


The second post, however: You might give Cleaveland a call, that looks like a plexiglass bit.
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  #48  
Old 04-09-2017, 05:08 PM
smithflys23 smithflys23 is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Jupiter
Posts: 62
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillL View Post
Actually, the OP just used standard drill bits.


The second post, however: You might give Cleaveland a call, that looks like a plexiglass bit.
Sorry. My mistake. Thank you for the tip. I will give Cleveland a call.
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  #49  
Old 09-04-2017, 08:08 PM
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vernon smith vernon smith is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Naples FL
Posts: 145
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I had the occasion today to try to drill out a 470 and soon found keeping a drill (135 degree) centered to be nearly impossible. I made up a simple drill jig that centers the drill on the rounded head and sends the drill dead down the middle of the rivet. It can also act as a drill stop so you don't drill clear through. If you use it for a stop you will have to clear the chips from the guide tool several times.

Of course, a different drill jig will be needed for each rivet diameter. I did mine in a lathe because I have one, it can be done in a drill press by a very good eye for the center of the fixture. I do not recommend trying to make one with a hand drill and a vise.

I cannot be the first person to make one of these

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  #50  
Old 09-05-2017, 07:50 AM
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JonJay JonJay is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Battleground
Posts: 3,914
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vernon smith View Post
I had the occasion today to try to drill out a 470 and soon found keeping a drill (135 degree) centered to be nearly impossible. I made up a simple drill jig that centers the drill on the rounded head and sends the drill dead down the middle of the rivet. It can also act as a drill stop so you don't drill clear through. If you use it for a stop you will have to clear the chips from the guide tool several times.

Of course, a different drill jig will be needed for each rivet diameter. I did mine in a lathe because I have one, it can be done in a drill press by a very good eye for the center of the fixture. I do not recommend trying to make one with a hand drill and a vise.

I cannot be the first person to make one of these

Here is a commercially available tool. You can set the drill depth and chips clear automatically. I have used this to remove hundreds of 470's. Works on all sizes.
http://www.cleavelandtool.com/Rivet-.../#.Wa6qQdRHarU
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