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  #21  
Old 10-29-2015, 02:38 PM
Champ837 Champ837 is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Andalusia, AL
Posts: 9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gasman View Post
Any movement is call for investigation. There can be no play in the socket or the bolt.

Here is how I test mine... With the nose wheel holding it's normal weight, place your finger on the top of the leg and the top of the socket. Gently create a side load by pushing on the motor to rock the nose left and right and feel for any movement. Place your finger on the bolt and repeat.

The bottom of the gear mount can be checked by thumping the gear leg just above the bend. With the faring off and the wheel clear of the ground, give the gear a good thump with your fist..... you will hear any play.

When you replace the bolt, make sure the shank extends beyond the mount wall. Measure the bolt and you will find that the bolt tapers just before the threads. That will cause play. I had to go to the next longer and added an extra washer under the head to come out just right.

My bolt is installed from the top. It was replaced without too much effort. I do not remove the leg during my annual inspection.
Thanks, Your detail is what I was looking for. Please explain "When you replace the bolt, make sure the shank extends beyond the mount wall." The shank being the smooth part of the bolt or the grip length. This should be exposed past the engine mount sleeve so that the smooth part of the bolt not the threaded part is in contact with the engine mount sleeve, RIGHT?

In another post someone mentioned this bolt/nut being torqued, is it and what is the torque?
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  #22  
Old 10-29-2015, 03:30 PM
Sam Buchanan's Avatar
Sam Buchanan Sam Buchanan is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: North Alabama
Posts: 3,715
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Champ837 View Post
Thanks, Your detail is what I was looking for. Please explain "When you replace the bolt, make sure the shank extends beyond the mount wall." The shank being the smooth part of the bolt or the grip length. This should be exposed past the engine mount sleeve so that the smooth part of the bolt not the threaded part is in contact with the engine mount sleeve, RIGHT?

In another post someone mentioned this bolt/nut being torqued, is it and what is the torque?
Right.

It is an AN bolt, torque per proper specs for that size AN bolt. The nut is just to keep the bolt from falling out of the hole.....
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1999 RV-6
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Last edited by Sam Buchanan : 10-29-2015 at 03:33 PM.
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  #23  
Old 10-30-2015, 10:04 PM
climberrn climberrn is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Carson City, NV
Posts: 279
Lightbulb Oversize bolt option

If replacing the bolt on the upper nose wheel does not remove all the slop, you could replace it with a 1 oversize NAS bolt. Any movement is too much. The reamer was pricey, but better than a prop strike if that bolt fails! Genuine Aircraft Hardware out of California was very helpful in finding the right part. Have the part numbers at the hangar if interested.
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  #24  
Old 10-31-2015, 12:36 PM
Champ837 Champ837 is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Andalusia, AL
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Originally Posted by rvbuilder2002 View Post
There is no published criteria, but any movement of a major structural member like a nose gear leg is not good.

If the movement is very slight, it is not necessarily a safety of flight issue at this point, but once movement is happening, it will only get worse and likely become more difficult to correct.

Sometimes it can be resolved with a new bolt (close tolerance may help if regular bolt is still loose). If that doesn't do it then a tapper pin is an option.

Doing a condition inspection on an RV should of course include researching compliance with Service Bulletins, but a loose nose gear leg warrants taking a specific look at THIS ONE.
Thanks for including the link to the SB. I had already finished the nose wheel servicing and checking the break away force and lubing the fork pivot. I'd looked at the pivot stop mechanism but thought nothing of the orientation of the stop arms. It WAS backward.
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  #25  
Old 10-31-2015, 05:08 PM
rvbuilder2002 rvbuilder2002 is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Hubbard Oregon
Posts: 7,567
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A backwards stop brackets causes much higher twist loads on the nose gear during sharp turns. This alone can cause a loose bolt.

A good condition inspection includes researching AD's and SB's that might be applicable/beneficial. I suggest you search the Van's web site for others that might apply to the airplane you are inspecting.
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  #26  
Old 05-17-2018, 12:15 PM
KRE KRE is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Madison, VA
Posts: 1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gasman View Post
Any movement is call for investigation. There can be no play in the socket or the bolt.

Here is how I test mine... With the nose wheel holding it's normal weight, place your finger on the top of the leg and the top of the socket. Gently create a side load by pushing on the motor to rock the nose left and right and feel for any movement. Place your finger on the bolt and repeat.

The bottom of the gear mount can be checked by thumping the gear leg just above the bend. With the faring off and the wheel clear of the ground, give the gear a good thump with your fist..... you will hear any play.

When you replace the bolt, make sure the shank extends beyond the mount wall. Measure the bolt and you will find that the bolt tapers just before the threads. That will cause play. I had to go to the next longer and added an extra washer under the head to come out just right.

My bolt is installed from the top. It was replaced without too much effort. I do not remove the leg during my annual inspection.
Is there any problem with installing the bolt from the top? I purchased my RV-9A used and no hole is drilled for the gear bolt to be installed as the plans show.
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  #27  
Old 05-17-2018, 12:56 PM
rvbuilder2002 rvbuilder2002 is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Hubbard Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KRE View Post
Is there any problem with installing the bolt from the top? I purchased my RV-9A used and no hole is drilled for the gear bolt to be installed as the plans show.
The purpose of it being specified inserted from the bottom is because it makes it much easier to remove if needed, and because a properly installed bolt (full diameter of the shank, through the entire diam. of the socket) often interferes with the firewall. Because of very tight clearance, installed form the top also usually requires turning the bolt to torque the nut (a less than ideal situation on a bolt that we want a very tight fit on).
If there is not bolt interference (or a slight dent is added to remedy the interference), and you are willing to possibly have to accept turning the bolt to get the nut torqued, then installing from the top is fine.
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Any opinions expressed in this message are my own and not necessarily those of my employer.

Scott McDaniels
Hubbard, Oregon
RV-6A (aka "Junkyard Special ")
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