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  #11  
Old 06-13-2018, 05:46 PM
William William is offline
 
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Location: Sarasota,Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Av8torTom View Post
Thanks for all the input.

I'm still looking for advice for the lest place to locate the main electric bus
You probably already know this but in your diagram the circuit breakers are your main power bus. The circuit breakers get tied together with copper bar and then a hot wire is bolted somewhere on the copper bar. Hot wire being activated through the master switch.

Bill
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  #12  
Old 06-13-2018, 05:51 PM
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Bugsy Bugsy is offline
 
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Default Screen sizes

Donít be afraid to put smaller screen size on pilots side. Gives you more options for backups etc. plus the map is what really takes up real estate on the s teen and that goes best on the second screen.

I have a single 7inch screen with PFD,map and engine instruments all sharing the same real estate. Ifr is no problem. The PFD doesnít need to be big.
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  #13  
Old 06-13-2018, 06:12 PM
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sahrens sahrens is offline
 
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By your post it looks like you are already using a software product to design your panel. I used UpNorth Aviation to draw my panel. Bill was easy to work with while designing my panel and he has a library of most of the items placed on panels. Why use him? (there are others that provide the same kind of service)

During the design process Bill would send me a full scale PDF of my panel. I would print it at an office supply store, then tape it to my panel. That way I could see how the placement of switches, EFIS, CBs etc actually looked from the pilot's seat. Could I reach them, were the switches in a logical sequence, can I really fit the EFIS where I want it. I would mark changes on the printed panel, send an email to Bill, wait for the update and repeat the process. It really helped me avoid some mistakes that would have been costly to fix. I really recommend that process.

Of course if your getting that through the software you are using, you are miles ahead of me. Good luck with the panel.
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  #14  
Old 06-13-2018, 06:15 PM
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Av8torTom Av8torTom is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by William View Post
You probably already know this but in your diagram the circuit breakers are your main power bus. The circuit breakers get tied together with copper bar and then a hot wire is bolted somewhere on the copper bar. Hot wire being activated through the master switch.

Bill
Iíve not seen that arrangement. All the wiring diagrams Iíve seen thus far show wires going from the bus to the breakers.

Iím thinking I should place the main bus and the avionics bus in the middle top of the sub panel.

Thoughts?
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  #15  
Old 06-13-2018, 06:21 PM
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Carl Froehlich Carl Froehlich is offline
 
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Location: Dogwood Airpark (VA42)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Av8torTom View Post
Iíve not seen that arrangement. All the wiring diagrams Iíve seen thus far show wires going from the bus to the breakers.

Iím thinking I should place the main bus and the avionics bus in the middle top of the sub panel.

Thoughts?
Not sure why you are tripping over this.

Once you have the panel layout for the avionics, any logical grouping of breakers is the path forward. Drill the holes and mount the breakers - done.

PM me if you want details on a two battery power distribution design.

Carl
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  #16  
Old 06-13-2018, 06:23 PM
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Mike S Mike S is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by William View Post
You probably already know this but in your diagram the circuit breakers are your main power bus. The circuit breakers get tied together with copper bar and then a hot wire is bolted somewhere on the copper bar. Hot wire being activated through the master switch.

Bill
Yep, what he said.

You can also use short pieces of copper bar to gang together like items, such as all avionics, all lights, etc.

I buy copper pipe couplings and cut off a ring a bit over 1/4" then cut it open and flatten out to make a buss bar for breaker hookup.
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  #17  
Old 06-13-2018, 06:48 PM
William William is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Sarasota,Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Av8torTom View Post
Iíve not seen that arrangement. All the wiring diagrams Iíve seen thus far show wires going from the bus to the breakers.

Iím thinking I should place the main bus and the avionics bus in the middle top of the sub panel.

Thoughts?

A quick search brought this up. Hope this helps, a picture with worth.... http://www.vansairforce.com/communit...Copper+bus+bar
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  #18  
Old 06-13-2018, 06:54 PM
rv7charlie rv7charlie is offline
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Pocahontas MS
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Tom,

Here's a useful description of an electrical buss (bus; busbar, etc):
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Busbar

If you're using breakers, the bus is the set of hot terminals on the breakers, strung together with wire or a metal bar (see previous posts), which is why I mentioned the complexity of wiring a 2D array (grid) in my earlier post.

I hate to sound like a tape loop, but have you read the Aeroelectric Connection book yet? If not, you might want to put design work in pause and go there, first.

Charlie
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  #19  
Old 06-13-2018, 07:50 PM
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TJCF16 TJCF16 is offline
 
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You might want to put the A/P head on top and put the radios down low. This is because the A/P head is shallow and will fit high in the middle with out cutting the support.
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  #20  
Old 06-13-2018, 11:23 PM
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wjb wjb is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Av8torTom View Post
Hello - I'm starting to think about the layout of my panel.....

Just FYI ... the Van's .dxf drawings of the panel show the blank WITHOUT the bend ... the actual panel is about 1 inch shorter with the bend at the bottom (guess how I know).
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