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  #1  
Old 06-12-2018, 08:26 PM
Vansconvert Vansconvert is offline
 
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Default Crimp or solder D sub pins?

Which is the way to go? I heard solder is better, and I heard crimping is better (easier for sure, but better?). Anyone know what places like SteinAir and Aerotronics are doing?
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  #2  
Old 06-12-2018, 08:35 PM
merlin3 merlin3 is offline
 
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Almost all shops will crimp i believe. I soldered when i installed my efis and havent had any issues but the last couple things i have installed/updated i have crimped.
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  #3  
Old 06-12-2018, 08:43 PM
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RV6_flyer RV6_flyer is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vansconvert View Post
Which is the way to go? I heard solder is better, and I heard crimping is better (easier for sure, but better?). Anyone know what places like SteinAir and Aerotronics are doing?
Crimp. All the Aerospace giants use crimps for the following reasons.

Solder is NOT better. Takes more skilled worker, longer time, more steps, and if not done correctly, there are more failure modes.
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  #4  
Old 06-12-2018, 09:30 PM
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az_gila az_gila is offline
 
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And get the machined barrel crimp pins -



Not the cheaper stamped version -



They will be much easier to work with. Steinair has them.
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  #5  
Old 06-12-2018, 10:03 PM
rv7charlie rv7charlie is offline
 
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If you don't have a background in electronics (meaning that you're very handy with a soldering iron), go with crimps for subD pins.

I've had several careers as an electronic tech. I've had a *lot* of practice using a soldering iron. I started out building harnesses using solder type subD connectors. I soon switched to crimps. I still solder a lot of stuff, but crimp subD's win for me for a number of reasons. They are much faster to assemble, they allow repositioning the pins (don't think you won't need this), and strain relief for individual pins is inherent in the connector body.

If you've never built the solder type subDs (and even if you have...), it's easy to destroy connectors due to overheating the plastic insulator material that separates & aligns the pins.

Hope that helps explain why crimps really are better, at least for subDs.

Charlie
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  #6  
Old 06-13-2018, 06:09 AM
Feetwet Feetwet is offline
 
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Location: Seattle/Tucson
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Default solder or crimp rule

Some time ago I heard the following general rule:

Solder when corrosion is the main problem, crimp when vibrations is the problem.

Makes sense to me, I solder most boat stuff, crimp most airplane stuff!

Do use the machined pins and special crimper though, much better and easier in the long run.
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  #7  
Old 06-13-2018, 07:22 AM
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rv6ejguy rv6ejguy is offline
 
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Default Another data point

We've soldered around 20,000 D sub connectors for our ECUs and other controllers (wire harness ends), some of these in service over 20 years and millions of hours in some severe environments. Zero failures.

If done right, extremely reliable.
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  #8  
Old 06-13-2018, 07:37 AM
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JonJay JonJay is offline
 
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It’s now obvious to me. The only way is to “scrimp” them.
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  #9  
Old 06-13-2018, 08:49 AM
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rv6ejguy rv6ejguy is offline
 
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Both methods are reliable if done correctly. Use whichever one suits your skills, experience and equipment available.
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  #10  
Old 06-13-2018, 09:19 AM
rv7charlie rv7charlie is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rv6ejguy View Post
Both methods are reliable if done correctly. Use whichever one suits your skills, experience and equipment available.
Exactly.

My earlier post worked on the premise that if you need to ask, you probably don't have the skills, experience and equipment to get consistent good results. And there remains the issue of easily corrected wiring errors and easily modified harnesses, which can be a factor as avionics are updated/changed.

And to the vibration issue: That's an old hangar tale that just won't die. A crimped connection has exactly the same vulnerabilities as a soldered connection to vibration. Both require proper support outside the joint to avoid flexing fatigue failure at the joint. Yes, solder may wick up the wire. But proper support outside the joint protects the wire from flexing. Crimped joints have an even bigger vulnerability; there's a stress riser at the crimp itself and if not properly supported, that's where the wire will break.

Charlie
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