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  #11  
Old 05-31-2018, 09:22 PM
JBPILOT JBPILOT is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Jesup, Iowa
Posts: 1,603
Default Even more comments - -

Try to get a ride with a very experienced RV-12 pilot. It flies much better with two in it, but you will get the idea if it is gusty and more than 15kts.
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John Bender
Flying RV-12 - Serial #120036
Paid in May ( 5-4-18 )
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  #12  
Old 06-01-2018, 09:42 PM
backcountry backcountry is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 31
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From my experience I feel the RV-12 can handle a 15 knot X-wind if the Pilot is really proficient with X-winds. The problem comes as the aircraft decelerates after landing and rudder losses effectness causing the nose to weather vain. The brakes are not effective enough to keep the nose from turning into the x-wind.
I like to land on the runway center line but this isnít a good idea in X-wind. I land on the down wind side of the runway and try to get it stopped before running off the up wind side. A couple of times I had to get the tow bar out to get it off the runway.
In strong X-winds I find it impossible to taxi due to weather vaining.
Iíve flown another RV-12 and itís the same. It just doesnít have enough brake power to keep it from tuning into the wind.
The aircraft handles great in the air and landings but lacks brake power for directional control on the ground.
If anyone knows of larger brakes for the RV-12 Iíd appreciate the information.
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  #13  
Old 06-01-2018, 11:45 PM
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rongawer rongawer is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Brentwood, CA
Posts: 348
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Quote:
Originally Posted by backcountry View Post
From my experience I feel the RV-12 can handle a 15 knot X-wind if the Pilot is really proficient with X-winds. The problem comes as the aircraft decelerates after landing and rudder losses effectness causing the nose to weather vain. The brakes are not effective enough to keep the nose from turning into the x-wind.
I like to land on the runway center line but this isnít a good idea in X-wind. I land on the down wind side of the runway and try to get it stopped before running off the up wind side. A couple of times I had to get the tow bar out to get it off the runway.
In strong X-winds I find it impossible to taxi due to weather vaining.
Iíve flown another RV-12 and itís the same. It just doesnít have enough brake power to keep it from tuning into the wind.
The aircraft handles great in the air and landings but lacks brake power for directional control on the ground.
If anyone knows of larger brakes for the RV-12 Iíd appreciate the information.
This is good feedback and the type of information I was looking for - thanks.
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- RV10, N1530G (reserved). Empennage in progress.
- RV12, N975G, Flying
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  #14  
Old 06-02-2018, 10:32 PM
RFSchaller RFSchaller is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 2,358
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The only time Iíve experienced weak brakes was right after replacing brake pads before the conditioning runs. Have you checked for any possible contamination in the brake pads like brake fluid?
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  #15  
Old 06-03-2018, 11:24 PM
backcountry backcountry is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 31
Talking

Iíve checked my brakes many times and they are clean and they can stop the aircraft satisfactorily. The only problem is holding the aircraft straight in a 10knot X-wind component.
Iíve also flown another RV-12 several times and itís the same.
It maybe that be that I fly stronger winds than most RV-12 operators. The RV-12 is a popular fun aircraft here at our airport but the others seem only to fly in perfect weather and clam winds.
Regardless I can land this aircraft in a much greater X-wind than it can be taxied in.
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  #16  
Old 06-04-2018, 12:42 AM
rvbuilder2002 rvbuilder2002 is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Hubbard Oregon
Posts: 7,868
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Quote:
Originally Posted by backcountry View Post
Iíve checked my brakes many times and they are clean and they can stop the aircraft satisfactorily. The only problem is holding the aircraft straight in a 10knot X-wind component.
Iíve also flown another RV-12 several times and itís the same.
It maybe that be that I fly stronger winds than most RV-12 operators. The RV-12 is a popular fun aircraft here at our airport but the others seem only to fly in perfect weather and clam winds.
Regardless I can land this aircraft in a much greater X-wind than it can be taxied in.
I have spent entire afternoons doing RV-12 demo flights at OSH with a direct left 90 degree cross wind of about 15 Kts (wind sock standing straight out).

The only challenge was during the take off roll (combined yaw to the left from take-off power torque, and the yaw induced by the cross wind).
Lifting the nose as soon as possible greatly increased the rudder effectiveness and allowed for steering without dragging a brake. I didn't have any problem doing long slow taxi's on the parallel taxiway.

An nose wheel with the steering friction not adjusted correctly will have an influence in weather vaning tendency during taxi.
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Scott McDaniels
Hubbard, Oregon
RV-6A (aka "Junkyard Special ")
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  #17  
Old 06-04-2018, 01:30 AM
dpemmons dpemmons is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: San Francisco, CA (KDVO)
Posts: 18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rvbuilder2002 View Post
An nose wheel with the steering friction not adjusted correctly will have an influence in weather vaning tendency during taxi.
Can you expand on this a bit? I recently bought an RV-12 and immediately installed the upgraded nose fork and adjusted the friction per the installation instructions. It turns fairly easily during taxi (both on purpose and when weather vaning), which I prefer as it makes it easy to correct small mistakes and I don't end up chasing the turns and over-correcting. I'm also still fairly inexperienced though.

On the other hand, the RV-12 I transitioned in seemed to have fairly high friction. Once it started turning it was pretty hard to fix and you had to be really on top of things to prevent it happening in the first place. Especially during landing.

Which is correct?
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  #18  
Old 06-04-2018, 09:10 AM
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DaleB DaleB is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Omaha, NE (KMLE)
Posts: 1,922
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dpemmons View Post
Can you expand on this a bit? I recently bought an RV-12 and immediately installed the upgraded nose fork and adjusted the friction per the installation instructions. It turns fairly easily during taxi (both on purpose and when weather vaning), which I prefer as it makes it easy to correct small mistakes and I don't end up chasing the turns and over-correcting. I'm also still fairly inexperienced though.

On the other hand, the RV-12 I transitioned in seemed to have fairly high friction. Once it started turning it was pretty hard to fix and you had to be really on top of things to prevent it happening in the first place. Especially during landing.

Which is correct?
Trust me, the breakout force adjustment in the manual is correct. Having the friction too high makes it VERY difficult to steer in any wind conditions (including calm). I let mine get too stiff due to some old grease and contamination, and it was no fun at all on the ground. Once adjusted properly it got a lot easier to taxi and my takeoff runs were back to normal.
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Omaha, NE
RV-12 # 222 N980KM "Screamin' Canary" (bought flying)
Fisher Celebrity (under construction)
Previous RV-7 project (sold)
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  #19  
Old 06-04-2018, 09:33 AM
rvbuilder2002 rvbuilder2002 is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Hubbard Oregon
Posts: 7,868
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dpemmons View Post
Can you expand on this a bit? I recently bought an RV-12 and immediately installed the upgraded nose fork and adjusted the friction per the installation instructions. It turns fairly easily during taxi (both on purpose and when weather vaning), which I prefer as it makes it easy to correct small mistakes and I don't end up chasing the turns and over-correcting. I'm also still fairly inexperienced though.

On the other hand, the RV-12 I transitioned in seemed to have fairly high friction. Once it started turning it was pretty hard to fix and you had to be really on top of things to prevent it happening in the first place. Especially during landing.

Which is correct?
The correct value is what is specified in the manual (18 lbs I think).

Too high, or too low both cause there own (but different) issues.
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Scott McDaniels
Hubbard, Oregon
RV-6A (aka "Junkyard Special ")
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  #20  
Old 11-29-2018, 09:34 AM
AirHound AirHound is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: OFallon IL now, everywhere before
Posts: 243
Default .......max Wind

.....the Van's POH that states 12 KT max crosswind and 35 max total wind.

I understand Cross Wind, Demonstrated Cross Wind, etc.....

What is maximum total wind? Does that mean ' max surface wind conditions' ...therefore, it better be tied down and secured or in the hanger?....OR?
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