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  #11  
Old 01-09-2018, 04:16 PM
iamtheari iamtheari is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HAL Pilot View Post
I have seen some builder logs where only the mating surfaces are coated. But that's a subject probably for the primer Wars ;-) I don't have an opinion on it yet just the input.
I have no interest in the primer wars, thankfully. It probably makes no appreciable difference whether I prime the mating surfaces of the spars and spar doublers or just the exposed surfaces after mating the parts, but as long as it's not a thickness concern where two layers of primer cause the vertical stabilizer not to fit onto the airframe, I'll be okay.
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  #12  
Old 01-09-2018, 06:08 PM
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HAL Pilot HAL Pilot is offline
 
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Actually if you are going to prime I believe that you want the mating surfaces primed first vs just the exposed surfaces. I did see some pictures of mating surfaces that were not primed that had hidden corrosion but do not remember where I saw that. The gist of that subject was with two surfaces held together there is more opportunity for moisture to not be able to dry out. hence the possibility of corrosion. On the flip side its all Alclad aluminum is coated.

This is the answer I got from vans aircraft about QBs

The QBs are primed, then assembled. It would not make any sense to do it the other way as there would be no primer between mated parts.

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  #13  
Old 01-09-2018, 10:34 PM
iamtheari iamtheari is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: ND
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HAL Pilot View Post
Actually if you are going to prime I believe that you want the mating surfaces primed first vs just the exposed surfaces. I did see some pictures of mating surfaces that were not primed that had hidden corrosion but do not remember where I saw that. The gist of that subject was with two surfaces held together there is more opportunity for moisture to not be able to dry out. hence the possibility of corrosion. On the flip side its all Alclad aluminum is coated.

This is the answer I got from vans aircraft about QBs

The QBs are primed, then assembled. It would not make any sense to do it the other way as there would be no primer between mated parts.

That is the understanding I got from the above. Prime, then join.
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  #14  
Old 01-18-2018, 03:38 PM
iamtheari iamtheari is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: ND
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My kit arrived last Friday and my tool collection has started to grow exponentially. I have to make a trip out of town to get a band saw (or figure out how to make the cut referred to below without one) but pretty much everything else is ready to go.

One curiosity I have, which relates to the band saw and to the first few steps of the kit, is this: Why is the first thing you do on this kit drilling a bunch of fresh holes and cutting off a small portion of the front VS spar? Those could clearly have been done by Van's. Is it an intentional move on their part to get you comfortable drilling new holes and cutting metal right on the first day of the build, or is there another reason behind it?
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  #15  
Old 01-18-2018, 04:21 PM
rvbuilder2002 rvbuilder2002 is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Hubbard Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iamtheari View Post
One curiosity I have, which relates to the band saw and to the first few steps of the kit, is this: Why is the first thing you do on this kit drilling a bunch of fresh holes and cutting off a small portion of the front VS spar? Those could clearly have been done by Van's. Is it an intentional move on their part to get you comfortable drilling new holes and cutting metal right on the first day of the build, or is there another reason behind it?
Note that the part # is VS-702
That means the origins of the part are the RV-7 kit, so it get used for more than one model.
That requires a small amount of adjustment (and drilling some holes) depending on which model it is being installed on.
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  #16  
Old 01-18-2018, 04:50 PM
iamtheari iamtheari is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rvbuilder2002 View Post
Note that the part # is VS-702
That means the origins of the part are the RV-7 kit, so it get used for more than one model.
That requires a small amount of adjustment (and drilling some holes) depending on which model it is being installed on.
Ah, I hadn't thought of that, since the 14 is part of the new part numbering system. I thought it was just for the learnin' and here I got to learn anyhow.
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