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  #1  
Old 11-19-2019, 07:31 AM
DickB DickB is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Williamsburg, VA
Posts: 10
Default Annual Inspections

I have always performed annual inspections on my RV12, and will continue to do so. However, out of curiosity, I was looking at the FAR's for any specific guidance, and as I read it, (91.409, paragraph (c)), it is not required for experimental light sport. Am I interpreting this correctly? Or, is it required by the manufacturer (Van's) for continued airworthiness (43.16) in the operating limitations? Or, should I go to the hanger and look at the operating limitations for guidance.
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  #2  
Old 11-19-2019, 08:12 AM
Keldog Keldog is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Grass Valley, CA
Posts: 22
Default Copied from the EAA website

What is a Condition Inspection?
A condition inspection is the equivalent of an "annual" for a type certificated aircraft. Although FAR Part 43 specifically states that it does not apply to experimental airworthiness certificates, the operating limitations on your homebuilt will include the following (or something similar):

No person shall operate this aircraft unless within the preceding 12 calendar months it has had a condition inspection performed in accordance with the scope and detail of appendix D to part 43, or other FAA-approved programs, and found to be in a condition for safe operation. This inspection will be recorded in the aircraft maintenance records. Condition inspections shall be recorded in the aircraft maintenance records showing the following or a similarly worded statement: "I certify that this aircraft has been inspected on (insert date) in accordance with the scope and detail of appendix D to part 43 and found to be in a condition for safe operation." The entry will include the aircraft total time in service, and the name, signature, certificate number, and type of certificate held by the
person performing the inspection.

Who can perform a Condition Inspection?
The inspection can be performed by any licensed A&P mechanic, an FAA Approved Repair Station, or by the builder of the airplane provided the builder obtains a "Repairman's Certificate" from the FAA. Note that unlike an annual for a type certificated aircraft, the A&P mechanic does NOT have to have his/her "Inspection Authorization".

Who can maintain a Homebuilt?
FAR Part 43 specifically states that the rules of that part do not apply to amateur-built airplanes. Therefore, any maintenance on an experimental airplane can be performed virtually by anyone regardless of credentials. (This does not apply to the condition inspection previously discussed). Let common sense be your guide as to what maintenance you conduct yourself.

When does the condition inspection expire on my homebuilt?
The answer depends on the wording of your aircraft's operating limitations. In the vast majority of the cases, the operating limitations require that a condition inspection have been completed and recorded in the aircraft records within the preceding 12 calendar months. The word "calendar" is key, as this means that the condition inspection runs through the end of the 12th month. For example, a condition inspection was completed and recorded in the aircraft records on 06/15/2014 would be in force through 06/30/2015 (i.e. through the end of June).

In rare cases, the operating limitations require the condition inspection to have been completed within the preceding 12 months. The absence of the word "calendar" means that the condition inspection would expire at the end of exactly 12 months (i.e., on the date of the previous inspection), rather than at the end of the 12th month. This situation is not common, but does exist. Homebuilt aircraft owners should check their operating limitations to verify the condition inspection requirements.
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  #3  
Old 11-19-2019, 08:24 AM
DickB DickB is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Williamsburg, VA
Posts: 10
Default

OK, thanks for the explanation Keldog. I always thought it was required, but was confused by what I read in Part 91. I have to say that I haven't read my operating limitations recently, but will look at them again.
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  #4  
Old 11-19-2019, 12:31 PM
BobTurner BobTurner is online now
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Livermore, CA
Posts: 5,986
Default

Note post 2 refers to aircraft certified as EAB. Light Sport has different rules, Iím not up to date on them but you can find them.
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  #5  
Old 11-19-2019, 03:39 PM
rvbuilder2002 rvbuilder2002 is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Hubbard Oregon
Posts: 8,429
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DickB View Post
However, out of curiosity, I was looking at the FAR's for any specific guidance, and as I read it, (91.409, paragraph (c)), it is not required for experimental light sport.
The actual text for 91.409 is

do not apply to -

(1) An aircraft that carries a special flight permit, a current experimental certificate, or a light-sport or provisional airworthiness certificate


I am pretty sure that in this case the light-sport is talking about SLSA (note it doesn't say experimental light-sport)

ELSA is experimental and falls under the current experimental certificate.
This FAR (and the fact that FAR 43 doesn't apply to experimental) is the reason that the inspection requirement is written back in via an aircraft's operating limitations.
So, yes, your operating limitations are the guidance for your aircraft.
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  #6  
Old 11-19-2019, 05:22 PM
sf3543 sf3543 is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: San Antonio, TX
Posts: 972
Default

In regards to :

"Who can perform a Condition Inspection?
The inspection can be performed by any licensed A&P mechanic, an FAA Approved Repair Station, or by the builder of the airplane provided the builder obtains a "Repairman's Certificate" from the FAA. Note that unlike an annual for a type certificated aircraft, the A&P mechanic does NOT have to have his/her "Inspection Authorization"."

I don't think is correct for ELSA aircraft. As far as I know, the FAA will not grant a repairman certificate for aircraft certified under ELSA rules. You either have to be a licensed A&P or have passed the 16 hour course to inspect your ELSA.

If it is an SLSA, you would need the same as above, plus the 120 hour course, if you want to do maintenance, since it isn't experimental.
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  #7  
Old 11-19-2019, 09:28 PM
rvbuilder2002 rvbuilder2002 is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Hubbard Oregon
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After taking the 16 hr course the certificate that is issued is called a Light Sport Repairman - Inspector certificate
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  #8  
Old 11-19-2019, 10:01 PM
D Weisgerber D Weisgerber is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Ionia Michigan
Posts: 37
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rvbuilder2002 View Post
After taking the 16 hr course the certificate that is issued is called a Light Sport Repairman - Inspector certificate
Is this for SLSA and ELSA? I would think that if you built a ELSA you could get a repairmans certificate.
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  #9  
Old 11-19-2019, 10:12 PM
RFSchaller RFSchaller is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 2,547
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The SLSA repairman course is 120 hours. The ELSA course is 16 hours. You still have to apply to the FAA for the certificate based on the course completion.
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  #10  
Old 11-19-2019, 10:42 PM
rvbuilder2002 rvbuilder2002 is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Hubbard Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by D Weisgerber View Post
Is this for SLSA and ELSA? I would think that if you built a ELSA you could get a repairmans certificate.
The 16 hr course gets you a Light Sport Repairman - Inspector certificate to use for inspecting an ELSA that you own.
A 120 hr course gets you a Light Sport Repairman-Maintenance certificate. That allows doing any work beyond the general items allowed for an owner and condition inspections on SLSA's.
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Hubbard, Oregon
RV-6A (aka "Junkyard Special ")
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