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  #1  
Old 03-09-2020, 05:55 PM
Piper J3's Avatar
Piper J3 Piper J3 is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Hinckley, Ohio
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Default Landing Gear Camber Angle...

I’m in the middle of my Annual Condition Inspection and replaced tires and brakes. With airplane raised up, it is a real eye-opener to see how much camber angle is built into the landing gear. I measure 11 degrees camber…

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Jim Stricker
EAA #499867
PPL/ASEL 1970 - Sport Pilot since 2007
80 hrs Flying Aeronca Chief 11AC N86203
1130 hrs Flying 46 Piper J-3 Cub N6841H
Bought Flying RV-12 #120058 Oct 2015 with 48TT - Hobbs now 542

LSRM-A Certificate 2016 for RV-12 N633CM
Special Thanks... EJ Trucks - USN Crew Chief A-4 Skyhawk
MJ Stricker (Father & CFI) - USAAF 1st Lt. Captain B-17H

Last edited by Piper J3 : 03-10-2020 at 06:32 AM.
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  #2  
Old 03-09-2020, 07:47 PM
pilotyoung pilotyoung is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Birmingham, AL
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Default Landing Gear Camber Angle

Just curious, are those Dessen retread tires?
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John D. Young, RV-12 Owner
Serial Number 120022, N6812Y
Bought it as a flying airplane in Feb. 2018
Just passed 240 hours flight time in RV-12, and 10,000 hours mostly in corporate jets. I am a CFI; CFII; MEI; and a advancd Ground Instructor, CFIG; and hoping to be able to help new RV-12 owners by doing some transition training for new builders and owners in RV-12's.
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  #3  
Old 03-09-2020, 10:54 PM
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Piper J3 Piper J3 is offline
 
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Yes, 500-5 6 PLY AWBS RETREAD ELITE PREMIUM 2 GROOVE (ELITE)
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Jim Stricker
EAA #499867
PPL/ASEL 1970 - Sport Pilot since 2007
80 hrs Flying Aeronca Chief 11AC N86203
1130 hrs Flying 46 Piper J-3 Cub N6841H
Bought Flying RV-12 #120058 Oct 2015 with 48TT - Hobbs now 542

LSRM-A Certificate 2016 for RV-12 N633CM
Special Thanks... EJ Trucks - USN Crew Chief A-4 Skyhawk
MJ Stricker (Father & CFI) - USAAF 1st Lt. Captain B-17H
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  #4  
Old 03-10-2020, 09:37 AM
funflying funflying is offline
 
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Location: arvada, co
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Hey Jim, or anyone, can you show me the formula to determine angle of the shim/s needed based on measurements from the centerline determining toe-in or toe-out.
Iíve done the measurements and need to figure sin or cosin or tangent and calculate degrees of angle needed to get as close to 0 toe-in.

Thanks
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Arvada, CO BJC
RV12, #401, Flying 2013, N612PC
RV6, 1996-2010 sold
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  #5  
Old 03-10-2020, 10:44 AM
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Depending on which measurements you took, it should be either ArcSine or ArcTangent. For these small angles, it shouldn't make much difference which one of those you use.

So, if x is the actual toe-in or toe-out you measured (in inches, mm or whatever), and y is the distance between your front and rear measurements (the measurements you took to determine x), then the angle is either arcSine(x/y) or ArcTangent(x/y).

If you wanted to be precise, use ArcTangent if the two measurements were measured along the centerline of the aircraft and use ArcSine if the two measurements were made along the axis of the tire.
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Port Orange, Fl
EAA #51411
RV-12 N121TK ELSA #120845; first flight 06/10/2015; 700 hrs as of 02/2020
RV-12 N918EN ELSA #120995 Eagles Nest Project; first flight 05/18/2019
SPA Panther N26TK; First Flight 03/13/2020
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  #6  
Old 03-10-2020, 11:17 AM
Ralph Inkster Ralph Inkster is offline
 
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Location: Calgary, Alberta
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I was taught a simple (too simple, so it couldn't possibly be accurate.. maybe) procedure from old guys I respect.

Plane on the ground in normal loaded state
- establish your center plumb line on the ground
- clamp a 3 ft or longer 3/4" angle to the brake rotor extending forward of the wheel
- measure distance from center line to angle near the wheel - and from a spot 36" forward from center line to the angle.
- 1" differential means 1 degree, obviously 0.5" would be a half degree. Simple method to determine what shim you need, or not.

For Camber adjustment - I'd simply look at the tire wear pattern & let that dictate if you need any shims.
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It's time to work on just my own planes, not everybody else's...

Last edited by Ralph Inkster : 03-10-2020 at 11:22 AM.
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  #7  
Old 03-10-2020, 12:06 PM
funflying funflying is offline
 
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Thanks both Ralph and Tom. These are both helpful.
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Arvada, CO BJC
RV12, #401, Flying 2013, N612PC
RV6, 1996-2010 sold
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  #8  
Old 03-10-2020, 06:40 PM
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RV8Squaz RV8Squaz is offline
 
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Location: Senoia, Georgia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph Inkster View Post
I was taught a simple (too simple, so it couldn't possibly be accurate.. maybe) procedure from old guys I respect.

Plane on the ground in normal loaded state
- establish your center plumb line on the ground
- clamp a 3 ft or longer 3/4" angle to the brake rotor extending forward of the wheel
- measure distance from center line to angle near the wheel - and from a spot 36" forward from center line to the angle.
- 1" differential means 1 degree, obviously 0.5" would be a half degree. Simple method to determine what shim you need, or not.

For Camber adjustment - I'd simply look at the tire wear pattern & let that dictate if you need any shims.
Hey Ralph,

FYI, 1" displacement, 36" from the axle gives me 1.59 deg. Someone please check my math.
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RV-8 N84JE
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  #9  
Old 03-10-2020, 06:55 PM
pilotyoung pilotyoung is offline
 
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Location: Birmingham, AL
Posts: 168
Default Landing Gear Camber Angle

Jim,

Some people say those tires are much heavier than the original tires. Has that created any problems for you?

Thanks.

John
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John D. Young, RV-12 Owner
Serial Number 120022, N6812Y
Bought it as a flying airplane in Feb. 2018
Just passed 240 hours flight time in RV-12, and 10,000 hours mostly in corporate jets. I am a CFI; CFII; MEI; and a advancd Ground Instructor, CFIG; and hoping to be able to help new RV-12 owners by doing some transition training for new builders and owners in RV-12's.
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  #10  
Old 03-10-2020, 07:13 PM
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tomkk tomkk is online now
 
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Location: Port Orange, Fl
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RV8Squaz View Post
Hey Ralph,

FYI, 1" displacement, 36" from the axle gives me 1.59 deg. Someone please check my math.
That's what I got too. You need about a 5' straight angle, not 3', to get 1" = 1 Deg.
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Tom
Port Orange, Fl
EAA #51411
RV-12 N121TK ELSA #120845; first flight 06/10/2015; 700 hrs as of 02/2020
RV-12 N918EN ELSA #120995 Eagles Nest Project; first flight 05/18/2019
SPA Panther N26TK; First Flight 03/13/2020

Last edited by tomkk : 03-10-2020 at 07:18 PM.
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