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  #1  
Old 06-16-2019, 07:27 AM
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RV6_flyer RV6_flyer is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: NC25
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Default AirVenture Arrival Flight Practice

The AirVenture arrival NOTAM has been published and they still want us RV types flying the approach at 90 Kts because we can safely do it. IF you are unable to fly your RV at 90 Kts, you should not fly your RV into AirVenture Oshkosh.

RVs have very good slow flight handling. IF you are uncomfortable with slow flight, you need practice with slow flight. IF you lack the confidence for slow flight in your RV, get a CFI or another RV pilot that is comfortable to ride along as a safety pilot.

I typically do not fly my RV much below 122 KIAS other than in the traffic pattern. In preparation for OSH arrival, I like to get some flight in the aircraft on a simulated RIPON 90 Kt approach. I try to find an area where there is some feature like a road on the ground to fly over and a safe altitude that is around 1,000 AGL. I have several roads near me that are similar to the RIPON VFR Oshkosh arrival that I can fly 1,800 (1,100 AGL) over the road. My goal is to find a power setting that give me 90 KIAS so I can have my head on a swivel watching for traffic and navigating by looking outside the airplane. My RV-6 has a constant speed prop so finding an RPM and MAP that works is sorta easy. My O-320 and Hartzell prop can safely operate at 2,100 RPM all day long. I have checked the TCDS for both the engine and the prop. On my airplane, starting at 16" MAP and 2,100 RPM gets me started for 90 KIAS. That is a little low but once speed has dropped, I can push the throttle in increasing MAP toward 17" and my airplane will stay at 90 Kts and 1,800 altitude.

For safety, I want to be looking outside and very comfortable with only a glance inside to check power, airspeed, and altitude. I need to be able to maintain my ground path OVER Railroad tracks or over my practice road. Yes I will cut the corners off sharp turns that require large heading changes because the VFR RIPON approach to OSH does not have any large heading changes.

I have a ham radio 2-meter APRS tracker in my airplane. Below is the image of the tracker of today's practice flight.


Being 2020 ADS-B out compliant with a Mode S transponder, I also have data about my flight available on FlightRadar24.


FlightRadar24 also has ADS-B out ground speed and altitude data that one can see. Altitude data is referenced to pressure altitude (29.92) so may not be exactly what was flown but it will show ups and downs from the planned altitude.


Now the world can see that I am not the best pilot when it comes to airspeed and altitude control but this is my starting point for my 2019 AirVenutre Oshkosh arrival. My flight west was into a headwind and when I turned, it became a tailwind. I will make more practice flights to prepare for 90 Kt arrival at 1,000 AGL. I need to be able to navigate looking out the window, watch for other aircraft, adjust speed for other aircraft, reprogram radio for possible frequency changes (I know what frequencies are being used before I get in line for arrival.), and also to be able to reprogram the GPS so that I can go to my alternate airport.
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  #2  
Old 06-16-2019, 08:29 AM
vic syracuse vic syracuse is offline
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Absolutely wonderful approach to OSH preparation. My hat is off to you!!!

Vic
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  #3  
Old 06-16-2019, 02:26 PM
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DanH DanH is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vic syracuse View Post
Absolutely wonderful approach to OSH preparation. My hat is off to you!!! Vic
I'll second that. Gary won't be "that guy".
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  #4  
Old 06-16-2019, 02:31 PM
Kyle Boatright Kyle Boatright is offline
 
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Practice is great. Everyone should do it. It might also tell you something about your airplane - how do your oil temperatures do at 90 knots, for instance?

Another safety measure is to set minimums. How slow are you willing to fly the conga line? I will not accept under 70 knots. I have a reasonable amount of margin there if I need to maneuver. Below that, I'm exiting the line.
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  #5  
Old 06-16-2019, 03:48 PM
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RV6_flyer RV6_flyer is offline
 
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Forgot to mention, "Precision, Short, Soft-Field landings" are what I do almost all the time. If you do not do them, get proficient with them before OSH and be ready for a "go-around" just in case.

As Kyle said, have a minimum speed planned to break out of the conga line. My airplane has CAS higher than indicated. At 70 KCAS, I break out of the conga line and start over. On my airplane, 70 KCAS is the same as 65 KIAS. Know your airplane and what you can safely do with it.
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  #6  
Old 06-16-2019, 05:53 PM
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n82rb n82rb is offline
 
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2nd what Gary says. Way to many people cant get anywhere close to the dot.

Bob burns
Rv-4 n82rb
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  #7  
Old 06-16-2019, 06:10 PM
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MikeyDale MikeyDale is offline
 
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I have flown the pattern at Oshkosh more than once looking down and seeing 80 mph so be prepared! Also when practicing at your local airport, make a normal approach at the numbers then hit the throttle before flaring and fly to the middle of the runway and then flare and land. All this considering you have plenty of runway. The airport I practice at has 10k' runway so I have plenty safety factor. This is a difficult maneuver if you have never practiced it. After having learned and practiced to hit the numbers for years it was a very awkward for me to goose it and fly down to the middle of the field!
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  #8  
Old 06-16-2019, 07:22 PM
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Brantel Brantel is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by n82rb View Post
2nd what Gary says. Way to many people cant get anywhere close to the dot.

Bob burns
Rv-4 n82rb
And some people try too hard to hit the dot and leave parts on the runway.
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  #9  
Old 06-16-2019, 07:25 PM
Paul K Paul K is offline
 
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Excellent post and I second all of it! Just want to reinforce the need to practice flying at 70 knots at max gross weight. In all the years I've flown into Kosh, never have I been able to do it at 90, usual much slower. Frustrating to have slower planes cut in front of you after doing everything correct just to have to go back for another try and get behind a very slow one again! This is more the normal so need to practice "very slow flight", down to your minimum comfortable speed. I go out and get very used to going very slow. Thinks even sound different going slow!
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Old 06-16-2019, 10:38 PM
chopowski chopowski is offline
 
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A more general question about slow flight and flaps, how would you know at what speed of slow flight it would be safer to put some flaps in and increase power?
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