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  #1  
Old 09-13-2017, 04:27 AM
tswanson tswanson is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Tremont
Posts: 6
Default DRDT-2 Style Squeezer (Would you use it if it was stiff enough?)

I'm getting ready to build a DRDT-2 style frame, and this question keeps popping in my mind.

I know the idea of squeezing with a DRDT-2 has been discussed before, and generally I believe the consensus is that the much higher force exerted by squeezing causes enough frame deflection that it is a bad idea.

Just for a minute, assume that you had a DRDT-2 style frame that was 10x or 100x (whatever it needs to be) stiffer, and that you could either attach your pneumatic or other heavy duty squeezer to it, and had everything aligned well etc. (We'll worry about if that is practical later. I'm going to do some FEA later to check this.) Based on the consistently excellent results that a squeezer can achieve with minimal talent from the user, along with the ability to do it with one person instead of needing a helper to buck, is there a reason you wouldn't use this to squeeze rivets where accessible? Seems like a no-brainer to me, but I'm just getting started with my first kit, so I'm admittedly a rookie.

Please omit "real men fly tail wheel aircraft", type comments. I know that using a gun and bucking bar is a skill that must be learned and used also. I just wonder why one wouldn't want to use a large c-frame if it were stiff enough, for less opportunities for "whoops I slipped and dented my skin" moments. There are around 17,000 rivets in an RV-7 from what I've read, so regrettable situations with a rivet gun seem inevitable, for a first timer at least.

Thanks,
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Last edited by tswanson : 09-13-2017 at 04:29 AM.
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  #2  
Old 09-13-2017, 04:49 AM
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blueflyer blueflyer is offline
 
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Default

I think we all have similar thoughts at the beginning. Once I got comfortable with the rivet gun, it became my preferred method. Im my opinion, the rivet gun is the easiest method, easiest to get into odd spaces, and fastest way to get it done. I would probably ask myself why I was wasting all that table space with a DRDT riveter sitting there.

Last edited by blueflyer : 09-13-2017 at 04:51 AM.
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  #3  
Old 09-13-2017, 04:57 AM
tswanson tswanson is offline
 
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Location: Tremont
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Sure, I have to have something for dimpling anyway though, so I figured I could make it to do both. I wouldn't have a separate frame.

I did a SportAir workshop, and their big 80gal air compressor fell over the day before (yikes), so the regulator was all over the place, and we were using standard steel bucking bars. Maybe using my own good quality tools, regulator, and tungsten bar will make me more receptive to using the gun.
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Last edited by tswanson : 09-13-2017 at 05:00 AM.
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  #4  
Old 09-13-2017, 05:40 AM
Tom Martin Tom Martin is offline
 
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Location: Ontario, Canada
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The reality is that there are not that many locations where you could use the tool for riviting. For example, almost none of the main fuselage and wing skins. Would it be handy at times? Yes, but not enough times to make it worth the effort. A standard C frame is hard to beat for cost, simplicity and consistency
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  #5  
Old 09-13-2017, 05:52 AM
Hwood Hwood is offline
 
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Default It's been done

http://www.vansairforce.com/communit...d.php?t=101784

By the way....the Numatx squeezer is a work of art!
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  #6  
Old 09-13-2017, 05:54 AM
wilddog wilddog is offline
 
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I don't see how it would be very useful because most of the rivets would still be inaccessible with it and the ones easy to get to could be done with a squeezer.
If your regulator wasn't working, you did not get a correct experience with a gun. Air pressure is critical with rivet guns.
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  #7  
Old 09-13-2017, 07:29 AM
Dan Langhout's Avatar
Dan Langhout Dan Langhout is offline
 
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Default What he said

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Martin View Post
The reality is that there are not that many locations where you could use the tool for riviting. For example, almost none of the main fuselage and wing skins. Would it be handy at times? Yes, but not enough times to make it worth the effort.
+1 for this thought.
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  #8  
Old 09-13-2017, 09:28 AM
cczarnik cczarnik is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hwood View Post
http://www.vansairforce.com/communit...d.php?t=101784

By the way....the Numatx squeezer is a work of art!

Here's his big brother..
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Last edited by cczarnik : 09-13-2017 at 09:31 AM.
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  #9  
Old 09-13-2017, 07:11 PM
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vernon smith vernon smith is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Naples FL
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A squeezer with the integrity to maintain a parallel relationship between the faces of the different set inserts is easy enough to fabricate. The problem will be dealing with it's weight. The deeper the throat the stronger the arms must be and the relationship will be geometric progression 2-4-8-16-32 etc.

I've given it some thought and purchasing a cheap bench hydraulic press would be the easiest solution. An air over hydraulic actuator can be purchased for a hundred bucks that will give you modulation and the feel will be watching the "tons" pressure gauge on top of the ram cylinder. Is it worth it for a one off, probably not. For a production shop I would think something like this would be a must.

http://www.baileigh.com/hydraulic-shop-press-hsp-10h
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  #10  
Old 09-13-2017, 07:31 PM
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wirejock wirejock is offline
 
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Default Rivet gun and tungsten bar

Quote:
Originally Posted by blueflyer View Post
... Im my opinion, the rivet gun is the easiest method, easiest to get into odd spaces, and fastest way to get it done...
I agree. While your at it, get really good at drilling.
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