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  #11  
Old 12-20-2017, 03:26 PM
luddite42 luddite42 is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 361
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Yeah you're not really doing your engine any favors by running only 2,300 RPM. They are designed to run at redline for the life of the motor. And like you say, the acro guys turn up way more than redline on downlines and have been doing it for decades with no perceptible impact on Lycoming engine life.
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  #12  
Old 12-21-2017, 12:24 AM
CAVU Mark CAVU Mark is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 60
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The engine is a bit of an enigma, I was told over 2000 hours on it, compression is good, and a much smaller prop was on it, so I am taking it easy until I can review the engine oil and screens for metal. A oil analysis will occur as well. I need to confirm I an flying a safe plane then I can start spinning it up and if it is the right plane for me.

And if anyone would like a metal prop with a clock from Ray Cote (he knows how to spin an engine) let me know, proceeds to benefit EAA Chapter 14.
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RV-3 restored - learning to land
Stearman - building - near 1st flight
L3 converting/building ribs
Helio Courier constructing
C-170A my trainer - sold
Kitchen - remodeling/done
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