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  #21  
Old 08-14-2014, 05:06 PM
jrs14855 jrs14855 is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Lake Havasu City AZ
Posts: 2,089
Default Fire

At least two recent events and one older Rocket event were fires caused by loose fitting on engine driven fuel pump. Very preventable.
Very few fire causes that are not preventable. IMPECCABLE MAINTENENCE is the answer.
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  #22  
Old 08-14-2014, 05:15 PM
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bill@fusion4.net bill@fusion4.net is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Suwanee, GA
Posts: 412
Default Parachute is the key

I've jumped out of 5 or 6 different planes that were not setup for skydiving. None were reall very difficult to get out of.

Usually if you could get the airspeed low you can then overpower any wind resistance.

I have not tried an rv. But I'll be glad to try
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RV-10 - Flying - Phase II. 99.8% done... it's never really done!
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  #23  
Old 08-14-2014, 05:19 PM
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comfortcat comfortcat is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Southern California
Posts: 616
Default Internet legend?

Kinda a side step on this, but it is my belief that Richard VanGrunsven himself tested all his aircraft, and he tested them wearing a parachute.

I would assume in all cases he believed he could exit the aircraft if required.

Has anyone ever tried and failed to exit one of these planes? After all, there are more than 8,000 flying.



CC
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David Boeshaar
RV-9A - N18TD (reserved) - Fuselage.
"My greatest fear: What if the hokey pokey really IS what its all about?"

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  #24  
Old 08-14-2014, 05:19 PM
paul mosher
 
Posts: n/a
Default fire

I think if you are on fire you will find the motivation to get out. The plexiglass is not very thick.
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  #25  
Old 08-14-2014, 05:47 PM
Berchmans Berchmans is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Anchorage, Alaska
Posts: 409
Default Fire, Really...

I must admit that these are fun to read. Somehow I think worring about bailing out of a flaming aircraft is a bit of a waste of time. Most people flying their RV's do very little aerobatics and that is very likely the only time one would be wearing a chute. I don't know anyone that wears a chute going cross country or out for the $$$ burger. I compare the odds of the engine fire while wearing a chute to something like getting mauled by a brown bear and a polar bear in the same day. If the fire occurs in the engine compartment shut off the fuel, fly the plane and get it down as fast as you possibly can. Practice emergency descents. See how fast you can get down from your normal cruise alt and get it in landing configuration, that's probably the best approach. If the fire is in the cabin and it's fuel related you might be SOL...
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  #26  
Old 08-14-2014, 06:39 PM
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donaziza donaziza is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 541
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Berchmans View Post
I must admit that these are fun to read. Somehow I think worring about bailing out of a flaming aircraft is a bit of a waste of time. Most people flying their RV's do very little aerobatics and that is very likely the only time one would be wearing a chute. I don't know anyone that wears a chute going cross country or out for the $$$ burger. I compare the odds of the engine fire while wearing a chute to something like getting mauled by a brown bear and a polar bear in the same day. If the fire occurs in the engine compartment shut off the fuel, fly the plane and get it down as fast as you possibly can. Practice emergency descents. See how fast you can get down from your normal cruise alt and get it in landing configuration, that's probably the best approach. If the fire is in the cabin and it's fuel related you might be SOL...
Years ago, I was tooling along at 11500 FT. ( No parachute) Suddenly started to get this acrid burning smell in the cockpit. Started looking for places to land like right-now-pronto. Then the smell suddenly went away. Maybe two years passed. One day, the mechanic was checking stuff. This required the two fuel gages to be pulled out. They turned out to be all misshaped and deformed. (As in high heat deformation) So I have to assume that was the source of the problem. ( This mechanic was what I would call an RV guru, ie, he knew how to fix everything RV---he helped guys build their RV's)

Later on, I became the owner of a parachute. Wore it virtually every time, including a trip out to the west coast and trips down to Florida just like the military does. Ya never know.
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  #27  
Old 08-14-2014, 06:51 PM
Bartman Bartman is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: NW San Antonio Boerne Stage Airfield 5C1
Posts: 160
Default parachute

(The correct term for a parachute in a container is "rig") I wear a rig all the time in my 8, cross country or just a short hop. I cant say if a person could get out of a 8 under all conditions you take a risk every time you leave the ground. We do know one person did get out of a 8. Lots of people got out of all kinds of planes in WW1 and WW2. Ive made over 5000 skydives and over 500 base jumps. When people ask why I wear one in my plane I tell them I have more trust in parachutes than airplanes. I think a lot of people justify not wearing a rig by convincing themselves that there is no reason to wear one because there is NO WAY they could get out , that is just not true. You may or may not be able to get out but if the time comes that you want out I am sure you would be better off with a rig. Better to have one and not need it than need one and not have it.....
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  #28  
Old 08-14-2014, 07:01 PM
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donaziza donaziza is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 541
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bartman View Post
(The correct term for a parachute in a container is "rig") I wear a rig all the time in my 8, cross country or just a short hop. I cant say if a person could get out of a 8 under all conditions you take a risk every time you leave the ground. We do know one person did get out of a 8. Lots of people got out of all kinds of planes in WW1 and WW2. Ive made over 5000 skydives and over 500 base jumps. When people ask why I wear one in my plane I tell them I have more trust in parachutes than airplanes. I think a lot of people justify not wearing a rig by convincing themselves that there is no reason to wear one because there is NO WAY they could get out , that is just not true. You may or may not be able to get out but if the time comes that you want out I am sure you would be better off with a rig. Better to have one and not need it than need one and not have it.....
AMEN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!
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  #29  
Old 08-14-2014, 07:08 PM
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plehrke plehrke is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Defiance, MO
Posts: 1,400
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bartman View Post
You may or may not be able to get out but if the time comes that you want out I am sure you would be better off with a rig. Better to have one and not need it than need one and not have it.....
That argument can be used to justify anything like a second engine, fire extinguisher, back up air data, stall warning, . . . . . The list goes on and on. It all comes down to the risk vs benefit and everyone has a different opinion on both.

Back to the original poster. Even if every one that owned an RV asked for Van to "sacrifice an 8 to see if one can indeed get out of the thing". Van has no reason to do it as even certified general aviation aircraft are not required to provide a way to egress in flight. Plus what do you test, straight and level, in a dive, in a roll, in a stall. . . . ? All are plausible times you remotely may need to bail. A wind tunnel test would tell you what happens in a wind tunnel but not likely to be correct of what happens on the real airplane.
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  #30  
Old 08-14-2014, 07:33 PM
Bartman Bartman is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: NW San Antonio Boerne Stage Airfield 5C1
Posts: 160
Default parachute

Yep that is true "that argument can be made to justify anything" Best thing to do to be safe is stay inside and don't do anything. OH,,,, wait a second,,,, if a person does nothing dangerous he/she is still going to die. dam if ya do dam if ya don't.
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