VansAirForceForums  
Home > VansAirForceForums

- POSTING RULES
- Donate yearly (please).
- Advertise in here!

- Today's Posts | Insert Pics

  #1  
Old 10-27-2017, 05:39 PM
mustangsqd mustangsqd is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Miami, FL
Posts: 3
Default Cowling differences ?

Hi! I'm new to the site, but have admired Van's designs,(and the people who build them) for many years. I'm finally at the point to begin looking to acquire an RV8.

I've noticed that some aircraft have an air scoop on the bottom of the cowling, while others do not. At first, I thought this was a function of whether the engine was carbureted or injected, that the carbed engine would have the scoop, and injected would not.

But I have seen injected RV8's with the bottom scoop too.

I prefer the sleeker look of the "scoopless" cowl, and had the following questions.

1. What factors determine the necessity of the lower scoop?
2. Can a scooped cowl setup be converted to the non-scooped arrangement?
(Depends on the answers to #1, I would presume)

Thanks !
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 10-27-2017, 06:03 PM
Carl Froehlich's Avatar
Carl Froehlich Carl Froehlich is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Dogwood Airpark (VA42)
Posts: 1,114
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mustangsqd View Post
. SNIP

1. What factors determine the necessity of the lower scoop?
2. Can a scooped cowl setup be converted to the non-scooped arrangement?
(Depends on the answers to #1, I would presume)

Thanks !
The “no scoop cowl” uses the horizontal injection Lycoming engine. The cowls with the engine air scoop use a vertical draft carb - or could use a vertical draft injection system. Back before Van’s offered the 180hp horizontal engine many people bought the O-360-A1A engine and backfited something like an AirFlow Performace FMS-200 injection system (that is what I did on my first RV-8A project).

A scooped cowl can be converted - but that depends on your fiberglass skills. But - other than a cobbled together mess this would require either a different engine or modifying the current engine for horizontal injection. Probably not what you want to do unless you are replacing the engine for some other reason.

Carl
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-27-2017, 07:02 PM
Dbro172's Avatar
Dbro172 Dbro172 is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Moorhead, MN
Posts: 952
Default

IO-360-M1B is the common engine for the smooth bottom cowl. 180hp Fuel-Injected, parallel valve, horizontal induction IO-360.
__________________
Derek Hoeschen
EAA Tech Counselor
RV-9A #92103 - N803DK
G3X, Superior XO-320, Dual Pmags, Whirlwind GA
www.mykitlog.com/dbro172/

RV-8 #83565 - N184DK - building
1968 Mooney M20C - Sold
1956 C-182 - Sold
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10-29-2017, 03:51 PM
Tiger 74's Avatar
Tiger 74 Tiger 74 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Chichester, UK
Posts: 31
Default

Here's one I got from from Vince at Rocket:
https://s5.postimg.org/4ccn2x9cn/IMG_0635.jpg
https://postimg.org/image/pyrnjy077/
https://postimg.org/image/sg3er7zj7/
https://postimg.org/image/d7dhdglab/

I have plumbed it with an in-line K&N filter directly to the horizontal cold air induction, so no pressure escape into the lower plenum.

To me, it looks better and less drag (I think).
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-31-2017, 08:10 PM
mustangsqd mustangsqd is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Miami, FL
Posts: 3
Thumbs up cowling differences

Thank you guys!

Now I know what to look for, - and if I find not quite what I'm looking for, I know what the tasks are to make the conversion....

I really appreciate the input!

Thanks again!
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:33 PM.


The VAFForums come to you courtesy Delta Romeo, LLC. By viewing and participating in them you agree to build your plane using standardized methods and practices and to fly it safely and in accordance with the laws governing the country you are located in.